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Picture of konata88
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Man, I haven't made ebi no chili sauce in a long time. It's a great izakaya or chinese restaurant dish in Japan.

If for myself, I get prawns with shells for a more flavorful broth; I keep the shells on but you can take off the shells and put them into some cloth to steep while cooking (before adding thickeners like doubanjiang). I eat the shells so I'm okay with keeping the shells on. Similar to ottosig's suggestion. I also use a konbu/iriko dashi vs chicken broth like ottosig.

If I'm lucky, I'll get fresh prawns w/ the head on - coated and deep fried goes great with the sauce. YMMV. Smile




"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." - B.Franklin
"Wrong does not cease to be wrong because the majority share in it." L.Tolstoy
"A government is just a body of people, usually, notably, ungoverned." Shepherd Book
 
Posts: 11756 | Location: In the gilded cage | Registered: December 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of konata88
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quote:
Originally posted by GT-40DOC:
I have everything ready to make large country style ribs with sweet mustard sauerkraut, and small new potatoes in my instant pot. It is a chilly overcast day and perfect for this. The kitchen will smell soooooo good!!.


Post up a recipe? I have a baby back rack in the fridge - would that work? Maybe not - not enough meat on the bones - St Louis or country style is probably better - meatier and less lean?




"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." - B.Franklin
"Wrong does not cease to be wrong because the majority share in it." L.Tolstoy
"A government is just a body of people, usually, notably, ungoverned." Shepherd Book
 
Posts: 11756 | Location: In the gilded cage | Registered: December 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of bobandmikako
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quote:
Originally posted by konata88:
If for myself, I get prawns with shells for a more flavorful broth; I keep the shells on but you can take off the shells and put them into some cloth to steep while cooking (before adding thickeners like doubanjiang). I eat the shells so I'm okay with keeping the shells on. Similar to ottosig's suggestion. I also use a konbu/iriko dashi vs chicken broth like ottosig.

If I'm lucky, I'll get fresh prawns w/ the head on - coated and deep fried goes great with the sauce. YMMV. Smile


I get all of my shrimp fresh from the docks, so they always are in the shells with heads. It's always Gulf brown or white shrimp. If I'm doing a shrimp boil, which is what I use them for most of the time, I'll leave the shells and heads on. I peel them for most everything else. I hadn't thought of using the shells/heads for flavor. That might work well. I'll definitely experiment with some type of shrimp or fish broth next time.



十人十色
 
Posts: 2044 | Location: Semmes, Alabama | Registered: June 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by bobandmikako:
quote:
Originally posted by konata88:
If for myself, I get prawns with shells for a more flavorful broth; I keep the shells on but you can take off the shells and put them into some cloth to steep while cooking (before adding thickeners like doubanjiang). I eat the shells so I'm okay with keeping the shells on. Similar to ottosig's suggestion. I also use a konbu/iriko dashi vs chicken broth like ottosig.

If I'm lucky, I'll get fresh prawns w/ the head on - coated and deep fried goes great with the sauce. YMMV. Smile


I get all of my shrimp fresh from the docks, so they always are in the shells with heads. It's always Gulf brown or white shrimp. If I'm doing a shrimp boil, which is what I use them for most of the time, I'll leave the shells and heads on. I peel them for most everything else. I hadn't thought of using the shells/heads for flavor. That might work well. I'll definitely experiment with some type of shrimp or fish broth next time.

Shrimp Bisque is fabulous stuff made with shrimp stock from heads and shells.
 
Posts: 233 | Location: Denton, TX | Registered: February 27, 2021Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
Tornados
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Jesse your posting on the previous page sowing a quarter next to a steak, it reminds me of a member here who would do the same, a quarter being dwarfed by a huge steak.

I can't recall exactly but his screen name was EZ or something like that. Wonder if he's still around.
.
 
Posts: 11321 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Ammoholic
Picture of Skins2881
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Crockpot chicken and gravy recipe over mashed potatoes from this thread.









Original recipe:



I modified by searing chicken on grill first, using fresh herbs, replacing water with stock, and heating soup/gravy in microwave first to decrease cook time and make more homogeneous.



Jesse

Sic Semper Tyrannis
 
Posts: 19884 | Location: Loudoun County, Virginia | Registered: December 27, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Drill Here, Drill Now
Picture of tatortodd
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Ended up browning some 85% lean ground chuck and putting my favorite store bought marinara (Silver Palate Low Sodium) over it. I put that over the top of fusilli pasta (I vastly prefer fusilli, rotini, and penne over sphaghetti). Simple but tasty.

Not as good as when I thaw out some homemade marinara from the garden or spend the time to make canned San Marzano into marinara, but it's a solid work day meal with leftovers.



Ego is the anesthesia that deadens the pain of stupidity

DISCLAIMER: These are the author's own personal views and do not represent the views of the author's employer.
 
Posts: 21691 | Location: N. Houston, TX | Registered: November 14, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Slayer of Agapanthus


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quote:
Originally posted by joatmonv:
quote:
Originally posted by mr kablammo:
Mulligitawny soup. And it is damned good.


Had to look that up as I've never heard of it. Interesting.
Do you have a recipe by chance?


Mulligitawny Soup nee Casa Kablammo

Large soup pan, 5" deep x 10" diameter; 2nd large skillet or large soup pan, rice dish/cooker

6 cups chicken broth
2 cups coconut milk
2 cups water, as needed

2 cups red lentils, sorted for debris
3 ~ 4 Tablespoons butter
1 medium onion, diced
1 ~ 2 stalks celery, washed and diced
celery greens, optional for garnish
1 medium carrot, peeled, washed, and diced
4-6 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped
2 ~ 3 cups butternut squash (preferred), diced to fit in a spoon; or apples (traditional)
1 piece ginger, app the size of the end of your thumb, peeled and julienned
2 bay leaves
1 Tablespoon Garam Marsala, or to taste
1 Tablespoon Curry Powder, or turmeric, or Sambhar Powder; or to taste
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon fenugreek powder (optional)
Salt and Pepper to taste
2 ounces coconut cream powder or coconut cream (either is optional but preferred)
1 cup white rice uncooked, to add as 1 ~ 2 cups cooked rice (long grain or basmati preferred)
1 ~ 2 cups cooked and shredded chicken breast (rotisserie is fine)
A little vegetable oil

Chop all vegetables before starting. Measure the spices. Clean the chicken breast of skin and yuck.

Carefully pick through the red lentils and rinse at least twice. Combine the red lentils and chicken broth in a soup pot that is at least 10 " diameter and 5" deep. Bring the lentils to a boil then turn down to a simmer and partially cover. Stir occasionally. The total cooking time for the lentils may be an hour or more. The red lentils should break down like split pea soup. Add water if needed.

Cook the rice according to directions.

When the lentils have been simmering and start to break down, about 45 minutes... add the spices and seasonings. Stir well.

In the second pan or skillet sautee and shred the chicken breast. Or pick apart a rotisserie chicken. Set aside the cooked shredded chicken. Keep an eye on the rice.

After removing the chicken, add the butter to the second pan or skillet. Melt the butter on medium high heat. Add the ginger and sautee for a few minutes. Add the butternut squash and sautee for a few minutes. Add the carrots and sautee for a few minutes. Add the onion and celery and sautee for a few minutes. Add the garlic and sautee for a few minutes. Stir constantly. The butternut squash should be soft.

When the lentils have broken down into a broth, add the coconut milk and powder, add the vegetables, add the chicken, add the rice; mix well. Add water if needed. Taste test and adjust the spice and seasonings. Remove from heat and allow to cool before serving.



Please pardon my tardy response. The recipe is not as much work as it seems but does take some time due to the red lentils needing to break down into a broth. And chopping the vegetables. Please provide your evaluation if you make the soup. I recommend preparation on a really cold day or evening.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: mr kablammo,


"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye". The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupery, pilot and author, lost on mission, July 1944, Med Theatre.
 
Posts: 5827 | Location: Central Texas | Registered: September 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
Tornados
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Spent the big bucks tonight, used 2 eggs. LOL.

I had the craving for an egg/bacon/cheese sandwich.

I used a silicone ring to make a round perfectly sized egg. Keeps things corralled, so much easier to this way.

Sorry, no pic, I was hungry, and I still have not figured out how to post pics.

.
 
Posts: 11321 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
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Black eyed peas and cornbread.
 
Posts: 10544 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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Pan fried extra thick bologna topped with a fried egg(seasoned with Cajun seasoning) and grated cheese. This all went on Russian Rye bread with some mayo and mustard. Potato salad as a side.

Mighty good eat'in if I do say so myself!!
 
Posts: 6272 | Location: Az | Registered: May 27, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
always with a hat or sunscreen
Picture of bald1
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Garlic - butter Bay Scallops with basmati rice and baby sweet peas.



Certifiable member of the gun toting, septuagenarian, bucket list workin', crazed retiree, bald is beautiful club!
USN (RET), COTEP #192
 
Posts: 15030 | Location: Black Hills of South Dakota | Registered: June 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by mr kablammo:
quote:
Originally posted by joatmonv:
quote:
Originally posted by mr kablammo:
Mulligitawny soup. And it is damned good.


Had to look that up as I've never heard of it. Interesting.
Do you have a recipe by chance?


Mulligitawny Soup nee Casa Kablammo

Large soup pan, 5" deep x 10" diameter; 2nd large skillet or large soup pan, rice dish/cooker

6 cups chicken broth
2 cups coconut milk
2 cups water, as needed

2 cups red lentils, sorted for debris
3 ~ 4 Tablespoons butter
1 medium onion, diced
1 ~ 2 stalks celery, washed and diced
celery greens, optional for garnish
1 medium carrot, peeled, washed, and diced
4-6 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped
2 ~ 3 cups butternut squash (preferred), diced to fit in a spoon; or apples (traditional)
1 piece ginger, app the size of the end of your thumb, peeled and julienned
2 bay leaves
1 Tablespoon Garam Marsala, or to taste
1 Tablespoon Curry Powder, or turmeric, or Sambhar Powder; or to taste
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon fenugreek powder (optional)
Salt and Pepper to taste
2 ounces coconut cream powder or coconut cream (either is optional but preferred)
1 cup white rice uncooked, to add as 1 ~ 2 cups cooked rice (long grain or basmati preferred)
1 ~ 2 cups cooked and shredded chicken breast (rotisserie is fine)
A little vegetable oil

Chop all vegetables before starting. Measure the spices. Clean the chicken breast of skin and yuck.

Carefully pick through the red lentils and rinse at least twice. Combine the red lentils and chicken broth in a soup pot that is at least 10 " diameter and 5" deep. Bring the lentils to a boil then turn down to a simmer and partially cover. Stir occasionally. The total cooking time for the lentils may be an hour or more. The red lentils should break down like split pea soup. Add water if needed.

Cook the rice according to directions.

When the lentils have been simmering and start to break down, about 45 minutes... add the spices and seasonings. Stir well.

In the second pan or skillet sautee and shred the chicken breast. Or pick apart a rotisserie chicken. Set aside the cooked shredded chicken. Keep an eye on the rice.

After removing the chicken, add the butter to the second pan or skillet. Melt the butter on medium high heat. Add the ginger and sautee for a few minutes. Add the butternut squash and sautee for a few minutes. Add the carrots and sautee for a few minutes. Add the onion and celery and sautee for a few minutes. Add the garlic and sautee for a few minutes. Stir constantly. The butternut squash should be soft.

When the lentils have broken down into a broth, add the coconut milk and powder, add the vegetables, add the chicken, add the rice; mix well. Add water if needed. Taste test and adjust the spice and seasonings. Remove from heat and allow to cool before serving.



Please pardon my tardy response. The recipe is not as much work as it seems but does take some time due to the red lentils needing to break down into a broth. And chopping the vegetables. Please provide your evaluation if you make the soup. I recommend preparation on a really cold day or evening.


Thank you very much for the recipe.


I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I'm not.
 
Posts: 3574 | Location: The armpit of Ohio | Registered: August 18, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My normal steak, pita bread and an adult beverage.
Smoked this Ribeye for a little over an hour at 210° with cherry wood. Got it up to 120 degrees and then seared it in a steel pan. More medium but still juicy.
I bought a 2 pack of these steaks and the other is dry brining in the fridge for tomorrow night. I'm thinking direct heat over charcoal.


I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I'm not.
 
Posts: 3574 | Location: The armpit of Ohio | Registered: August 18, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Stuffed mushrooms, cream cheese stuffed, bacon wrapped jalapeños, and a Costco pork loin roast on the rotisserie. We are eating one meal per day, this hit the spot!


P226 9mm CT
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Springfield custom 1911 hardball
Glock 21
Les Baer Special Tactical AR-15
Now P226 x5 L-1!
 
Posts: 954 | Location: Vermont | Registered: March 24, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just put it on. See how this goes with the weather.


I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I'm not.
 
Posts: 3574 | Location: The armpit of Ohio | Registered: August 18, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Turned out awesome. Almost 2 hours on the Weber kettle and I had to open the vents more than normal. Pulled at 125° and rested for 15 minutes. Not gonna lie, those are instant potatoes.
Traeger Prime Rib Rub used and it's excellent.


I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I'm not.
 
Posts: 3574 | Location: The armpit of Ohio | Registered: August 18, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
אַרְיֵה
Picture of V-Tail
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joatmonv -- your last photo brings back some memories for me. One of my customers was a German guy who owned a small hardware store / bait shop. He was usually the last stop on my route, so I seldom refused when he opened the refrigerator in the office section of his store and pulled out a couple bottles of Warsteiner for us.

[/url]



Any cocktail can be a shrimp cocktail if you put your mind to it, and if you carry lots of loose shrimp in your pocket.

הרחפת שלי מלאה בצלופחים
 
Posts: 28078 | Location: Central Florida, Orlando area | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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V, probably my favorite beer even though I'm partial to Guinness.
Pairs well with just about all food I cook.


I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I'm not.
 
Posts: 3574 | Location: The armpit of Ohio | Registered: August 18, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Little ray
of sunshine
Picture of jhe888
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Beef stroganoff.




The fish is mute, expressionless. The fish doesn't think because the fish knows everything.
 
Posts: 52233 | Location: Texas | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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