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quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
This is assuming that the post-credit scene is contemporary to the events of Season 1.

Maybe they were stockpiling those pieces until they had constructed a sufficient quantity of them, and then eventually built and installed the laser 5 years after the events of Season 1, with this scene being a glimpse ahead at that.

The second option is the way I took it
 
Posts: 8948 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well, whaddya know... One of the favorite Star Wars nerd Youtubers - EckhartsLadder - just released a quick video addressing this very topic a few minutes ago.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfAzakV1ZUE



Note that this one's on his alternate short clips channel, EcksClips. But here's a link to his full video channel if you want to check out some of his normal Youtube videos: https://www.youtube.com/channe...F1mQGuaXiDj5otWBmIjg
 
Posts: 30371 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by IrishWind:
quote:
Originally posted by corsair:
...
Anybody know why Syril and the eager Scottish Sergeant swapped hats on the bus ride in?


I think it was to make Syril fit in better. Syril was a bit white collar, and becoming an Imperial bureaucrat didn't help.

As for the spoiler scene at the end, they could have shown the Death Star at 25-40% done, and people would have got what it was.

One theory I heard is, by swapping caps, they could ID each other in a crowd...not a bad idea but, something like that would require a bit of exposition or, assumption by the viewer.

That short-brim, kepi style hat was pretty common throughout the inhabitants on Ferix, along with being a recognizable uniform item for Imperial officers. Star Wars wardrobe has always tapped into esoteric and uncommon styles from around the world, putting a bit of twist to it.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by corsair:
quote:
Originally posted by IrishWind:
quote:
Originally posted by corsair:
...
Anybody know why Syril and the eager Scottish Sergeant swapped hats on the bus ride in?


I think it was to make Syril fit in better. Syril was a bit white collar, and becoming an Imperial bureaucrat didn't help.

As for the spoiler scene at the end, they could have shown the Death Star at 25-40% done, and people would have got what it was.

One theory I heard is, by swapping caps, they could ID each other in a crowd...not a bad idea but, something like that would require a bit of exposition or, assumption by the viewer.

That short-brim, kepi style hat was pretty common throughout the inhabitants on Ferix, along with being a recognizable uniform item for Imperial officers. Star Wars wardrobe has always tapped into esoteric and uncommon styles from around the world, putting a bit of twist to it.


I just saw a clip giving the same explanation about hat swapping too. Makes sense.


Lord, your ocean is so very large and my divos are so very f****d-up
Dirt Sailors Unite!
 
Posts: 24829 | Location: NoVa | Registered: May 06, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Now that season-1 is completed, people are pushing out, gushing about Andor



Andor Is The Best Star Wars Ever Made
quote:
Tony Gilroy’s Andor finally puts the war in Star Wars and brilliantly taps the franchise’s full potential.


....
I was glued to what I was seeing. Stunned by it, really. The opening was so raw and the production quality was so good, I knew this could be the 'chosen one' we have long been waiting for — Star Wars not for kids. A true war story in space that focused on plot development and character building, instead of selling the next batch of toys. And above all else, a show that could do the very dark overtones outlined but glossed over by decades of Star Wars content justice. It was a big ask, especially considering this is a Disney show — not exactly a situation that screams 'let's take a big risk on disrupting a core all-ages property!' — that would run on its family-focused streaming service.

Over the next two episodes, the show took its time. It carefully set all the pieces into motion. Gone were the absolutely minimal dialogue and Western/samurai film worship of Favreau and Filoni's creations, this show was dialogue driven. There were no real standout action sequences, which was absolutely refreshing in an age of clumsy over-the-top action overriding plot by default, especially when it comes to marquee sci-fi tentpoles. In its place was absolutely astonishing world-building and a sense of being grounded like no other Star Wars vehicle had delivered prior.

....

Maybe the biggest difference in this Star Wars offering, at least at its most basic level, is that there are no Jedi to be found. No force. No light sabers. This reality provides the same perspective as 99.99% of the fictional characters living in George Lucas's galaxy from long ago and far away. Once again, it's very grounded and removed from the more fantasy elements of Star Wars, which is an amazing feat for a Star Wars show. It turns out that you don't have to rely on those old staples that the franchise established itself on to make an awesome Star Wars story. In fact, not being shackled to those elements opens up a whole new set of possibilities.

The truth is, when the original trilogy wrapped, the force was still a very mysterious thing. Fast forward four decades, two other trilogies and a ton of television, as well as other media, and the force is now a commodity. So breaking away from it is actually exciting as it can't be used as a writing crutch when needed. These are regular people, not supernatural ones, with real problems. And there is still plenty of force in the franchise if you want your fix.

....

Maybe the biggest opportunity lies in Andor being a great show for Star Wars super-fans as well as for those who outright dislike Star Wars. The show's high quality and unique tone could bring a lot of new folks into the franchise that had long rejected it.

Bottom-line, for me, Andor isn't just the best Star Wars in years, it is the best Star Wars ever made. And it would have been nowhere near as rich or enjoyable if it had not made the leap it did by jumping off the shoulders of all that came before it.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: corsair,
 
Posts: 13240 | Location: Wine Country | Registered: September 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So I got to rewatch the second half of the season with my nephew over the holidays as he caught up and a couple things stood out. First he called out something I thought of on first watch. During Fiona Shaw’s (Marva) epic funeral speech that it looked like she said “Fuck the empire!” when clearly “Fight” is said audibly. Then today I see many articles such as this one, talking about how Shaw originally recorded it as “Fuck the empire!” But Disney censors of course put the kabosh on that and dubbed “Fight” over it. Just thought it was funny. As the actors said, I can imagine the insurrection set was pumped hearing that battle cry when filming the funeral riot scenes.

Secondly, I’ll post the video of the most epic speech in the show. If you plan on watching the show, wait and see it in the show. For those who don’t watch the show, but just enjoy reading us discuss it, enjoy an amazingly written and delivered monologue by the great Stellan Skarsgard. The context is this is the spy leader in charge of pulling the strings of the start of the entire rebellion in Star Wars that you see the rebels fighting in the original trilogy. He’s been at it for 15 years at this point, and another spy basically asks what has his sacrifice been.



I’ve watched this monologue a dozen times since we first saw it in episode 10 and I’m still convinced Luthen might be a former Jedi. I may be completely wrong which is fine, he’d still be great, but things that make me lean this way is in what he says such as:

* “Calm. Kindness, kinship. Love. I’ve given up all chance at inner peace”. It seems like all hallmarks of the Jedi order. He having turned away from that inner peace they strive to reach with the force as a necessity for the way this fight is fought.

* “I share my dreams with ghosts. I wake up every day to an equation I wrote 15 years ago from which there’s only one conclusion: I’m damned for what I do” His dreams of peace are shared with the ghosts of all his friends who were all Jedi, killed in Order 66, 15 years ago when he made up his mind to take this fight back to the empire. Knowing doing this in part as vengeance for them is damning him from what is taught is the way of the Jedi.

* “My anger, my ego, my unwillingness to yield, my eagerness to fight, they’ve set me on a path from which there is no escape.” More related to the last point. All things shunned by Jedi but embraced by the dark side, but ideals he’s had to embrace to fight, this fight, this way.

* “What is... what is my sacrifice? I’m condemned to use the tools of my enemy” Again the condemnation, the damming for turning to the ways and tools of the enemy. The lying, the subterfuge, the cruelness, the disregard for others. Again dark side ways.

Beyond his speech I think that the kyber crystal he wears around his neck is from his own lightsaber, which may or may not even be that cane/walking stick he always carries. They’ve focused briefly on it a few times now. I think that’s why he let Cassian know how important the crystal was to him when he let him hold on to it as collateral for participating in the Aldhani heist.

Maybe we’ll find out next season or maybe we never get a backstory and he’s just a battle hardened patriot who stepped up to lead. Since we first met them on Aldhani, I’ve thought Vel’s his daughter. But again hat goes against him being a Jedi, unless he left the order and stopped practicing the force long before order 66. Anyway this is long enough. I’m just glad its so good I cared enough to think about all those things.
 
Posts: 561 | Location: Colorado via South Louisiana | Registered: September 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So far, I've seen three popular theories about Luthen Rael and a Jedi connection:

1) He's actually Rael Aveross, Count Dooku's former apprentice before Dooku went fully to the dark side. It's an established canon character, but one that was rather recently introduced in 2019. And beyond just the names, the personalities also match up, with Aveross known for playing fast and loose with Jedi rules and morality (though not to the point of falling to the dark side like his master).

2) Luthen isn't a Jedi, but his lover/brother/etc. was. He took up the fight after their murder, and carries their kyber crystal with him as a memoir.

3) He's not a Jedi, and has no direct connection to them. It's all a big red herring, to drive discussion and generate hype.

quote:
Originally posted by swampdog:
Since we first met them on Aldhani, I’ve thought Vel’s his daughter. But again hat goes against him being a Jedi, unless he left the order and stopped practicing the force long before order 66.


Nothing says Jedi can't have sex. They just aren't supposed to form romantic attachments, because they can easily lead to negative emotions like jealousy, and thus increase the risk of intrusion by the dark side.

Sex doesn't always have to equal romantic attachment.

But it's been demonstrated that there are widely varying degrees of adherence to the Jedi Council's rules among the various Jedi.

There have even been prominent Jedi Masters who have fallen in love, like Obi Wan with Satine.

The Jedi Council also sometimes grants explicit permission to marry and father children, like with Jedi Master Ki-Adi-Mundi.
 
Posts: 30371 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Hound Dog:
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Originally posted by PASig:

Are you forgetting that in Return of The Jedi, that was a SECOND Death Star? Luke blowed the first one up at the end of A New Hope.


I know. I was comparing the construction methods of the first Death Star to the second. This (first) one looked complete with the sole exception of the laser assembly. In Jedi, the second Death Star was incomplete, and it was obvious looking at it. It seems that if they really wanted to show the first Death Star to be incomplete, it would have at least somewhat resembled the one in Jedi (unless people would have gotten confused and thought we were seeing the second Death Star when the first one was being built). . .

Now, for the first one we saw here, they could have built the shell, installed the laser unit, and THEN finished the interior (like bricking and roofing a house and then putting in the floors, carpet, appliances, lights, etc). That could have taken 5 years. I am no expert on Imperial construction methods. However, for the sake of the show, it would have been much better to simply show that the first Death Star was nowhere near complete, instead of making it look like all they needed to do was put in the laser unit when we know there are 5 more years to go until the events of Rogue One. . .

(Look at my C.U.T. - I'm a Space Nerd)


In "jedi" the second Death Star WAS complete, only looked incomplete, per the trap the Emperor laid.

Remember when he told Luke "... THIS FULLY OPERATIONAL BATTLESTATION"





Strive to live your life so when you wake up in the morning and your feet hit the floor, the devil says "Oh crap, he's up."
 
Posts: 33282 | Location: St. Louis MO | Registered: February 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think they were wanting to show how many zillion of those Axles were being used to build the Death Star and Andor messed up the supply line on that unknowingly.
 
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Originally posted by KevinCW:

In "jedi" the second Death Star WAS complete, only looked incomplete, per the trap the Emperor laid.

Remember when he told Luke "... THIS FULLY OPERATIONAL BATTLESTATION"


Well, the second Death Star was still under construction, and therefore not 'complete.' Just look at the thing - it was clearly half finished. Now, "Complete" is different than a (to quote the Emperor) "...fully armed and operational battle station." In that, they pulled a sneaky on the Rebellion, by finishing the Death Star's main weapon before they completed construction. That's why I made a comment about not being an expert on the Empire's construction techniques. In the case of the first Death Star, it looked like the last thing to be completed was the planet killer gun. They showed the gun being inserted into what appeared to be a fully complete ship (and despite the fact it looked like a moon, the Death Star WAS a starship).

Now, I assumed (perhaps incorrectly) that in Andor the interior of the Death Star was completed as shown in that stinger, and the only part remaining to be done was the gun. In practice, this could have happened several ways. Perhaps the most logical (not always applicable to Star Wars OR real life, of course) would be for the major large interior components to be inserted and THEN the outside finished. This happens in modern ship-building. They build the hull from the keel up, insert the engines, turbines, fuel tanks and batteries (in the case of subs), and major sub-assemblies, and THEN plate over everything. In the case of larger parts like engines, generators, and turbines, these would require major disassembly to replace them later in service. Taking the example of a WWII era battleship, the ship is built as described above and then launched even though it is far from finished. The newly floated ship is taken out of the dry dock where it was built (to make room for the next project), and finished while floating next to a construction pier with large cranes and other major infrastructure. The superstructure is then built and the guns installed. THEN, all the nit-noid details are finished, such as searchlights, radars, AA guns, beds, sinks, kitchen appliances, laundry room accouterments, medical equipment, and the thousands of myriad pieces parts that go into a finished ship. Only THEN is it ready to begin sea trials. And later still, it is fully fueled and armed (itself a major undertaking for such a large ship). I took the gun assembly to be like the battleship's main guns. These were immensely huge assemblies. In most cases, the main guns were took the longest to build (it took several years to build and assemble the guns and turrets). In fact, the Royal Navy's last battleship, HMS Vanguard, was built just because they had some spare 15" gun turrets laying around after converting two old battlecruisers into carriers and it would be faster to build a new ship with the old guns than to wait for the new guns. This is why it looks like a WWII battleship with WWI guns turrets (which, in fact, they were).

In Rogue One, the first Death Star's main gun was inserted, and then it immediately set off for a shakedown cruise. This implies it was complete, or nearly so. I did not notice any signs of on-going construction in either R1 or A New Hope. It could travel under its own power (at light speed, which is a much more impressive feat than destroying a planet, IMO), and was in all respects (that we could see) a complete spacecraft.

In Jedi, they took a different route. Perhaps it was part of the Emperor's plan to lure the Rebels there - it LOOKED to be inoperable, as the Rebels assumed. That is why they chose to attack it then - to destroy it before it could become operational. Palpatine was using the Death Star to lure the bulk of the Rebel fleet into a major fleet engagement to destroy them in a single decisive battle (kind of like how the Royal Navy in WWI and WWII wanted to destroy the smaller German fleet in a classic major fleet engagement, while the Germans resisted the temptation, since the RN had a major numerical superiority at the time). Vader himself mentioned in the beginning that he was there to put the progress of construction back on schedule, meaning they were clearly still working on it. It seems obvious that while the Death Star as a *weapon* was complete (good enough for the Emperor's plans, at least, since it could pew pew just fine), it was far from complete as a *spacecraft.* It likely could not move on it's own (either sublight or light speed), and it also seems a likely assumption that when fully completed, it would look just like the first one (though bigger in size than the original).

Now, the most unlikely concept for the entire movie to me was how they could build the thing out in the middle of nowhere without any major infrastructure nearby. Construction of even commercial freighters requires massive specialized equipment and skilled workers. Where would all those people sleep? Where were their stockpiles of parts. Heavy equipment (cranes, welders, metal-bending gear, etc), immense power supplies, and other industrial items? You don't build a nuclear aircraft carrier in a tropical lagoon in the middle of the Pacific. Heck, you could not even do it at Pearl Harbor. After the December 7 attack, damaged ships were sent to the mainland where they could be taken into a major shipyard for repair/renovation/modernization (which took years even then).

So, yeah, it's a space fantasy with talking frogs (Yoda) and rabbits (jar jar), space wizards fighting with laser swords, and a simplistic (but still enjoyable) good vs evil plot. People like me spend WAYYYY too much time digging into the minutia than is likely necessary, since none of this is real. Of course, that doesn't stop us from having some good intellectual discourse about it all. . .


We were re-watching Andor with my 30-yr old nephew last night, and he officially declared he was done with it (we got through episode 9, IIRC). It was just too slow and plodding for him. I had no desire to re-watch it, either, but I did like the discussion at the ISB staff meetings. I found it to be really good writing where they had Smug Black Dude challenging Smug White Girl over her obsessive investigation over the thefts of Imperial items across the galaxy and how she tied these thefts to a rebel effort. That old dude is a really good actor and played the part of the old dogmatic bureaucrat really well (though, unlike most bureaucrats, he was capable of change and admitting his system might need to change based on evolving conditions.



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Posts: 21685 | Location: Hobbiton, The Shire, Middle Earth | Registered: September 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Hound Dog:
Now, the most unlikely concept for the entire movie to me was how they could build the thing out in the middle of nowhere without any major infrastructure nearby. Construction of even commercial freighters requires massive specialized equipment and skilled workers. Where would all those people sleep? Where were their stockpiles of parts. Heavy equipment (cranes, welders, metal-bending gear, etc), immense power supplies, and other industrial items?


The majority of the Death Star was built in orbit around the planet of Geonosis, which was one of the most significant industrial worlds in the galaxy. The Geonosians had been responsible for the construction of the majority of the Separatist's droid soldiers, and had also designed the Death Star for the Separatists, before the Republic conquered the planet and took control of its vast industrial facilities. The Geonosians and their facilities were then devoted to building the Death Star for the Republic/Empire, initially using construction droids and later also using millions of slave laborers (primarily Geonosians and Wookies). About 2/3 of the way through construction, a riot by the slave laborers caused the Empire to slaughter the slaves and move the partly unfinished Death Star to a more secure location. This move also helped preserve the secrecy of the project.

At that point, the Death Star was moved to orbit around Scarif, also a primary construction location for the Empire, as well as one of its most secure. This is where it was finished, using mostly construction droids rather than sentient laborers. In orbit above Scarif is where the Andor post-credit scene is shown, and where Rogue One takes place.

In short, the Death Star was mostly built at one of the largest industrial planets in the galaxy, and then finished at a different major construction location. They had plenty of infrastructure available at either location.
 
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Originally posted by RogueJSK:

In short, the Death Star was mostly built at one of the largest industrial planets in the galaxy, and then finished at a different major construction location. They had plenty of infrastructure available at either location.


That was the first Death Star, not the one from Jedi. . .

Which, kind of makes my point. They constructed the first one at a major shipyard, with ready access to thousands (millions, likely) of skilled workers, heavy infrastructure, and handy access to raw materials and other finished products.

Eh. The construction of the 2nd Death Star in Jedi is about as realistic as in Return of Skywalker where they somehow built thousands of Star Destroyers in secret in the middle of some kind of briar patch without ANYBODY IN THE GALAXY having a clue what was going on. . .



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Originally posted by Hound Dog:
That was the first Death Star, not the one from Jedi. . .


I misread. You were jumping around between griping about the construction of two different Death Stars.

The DS2's construction isn't nearly as fleshed out in the lore as DS1's. But here's what the Star Wars wiki says about it:

quote:
The construction of the Death Star II was conducted in four main stages. The primary stage focused on assembling the components necessary for construction of the reactor core as well as the two massive cylindrical polar columns used to distribute power around the station... As was confirmed during development of the first Death Star, construction advanced most efficiently when the working surface allowed for sufficient space for the greatest possible number of self-replicating construction droids... Arrays of temporary repulsorlift generators were installed in engineering sectors to assist construction, and the countless welding droids in operation meant that large areas of the station were constantly illuminated, allowing human crews to supervise construction operations. Convoys of spacecraft were in constant transit to and from construction areas, supplying materials to active crews. During development, outer-shell-construction crews lived in the far south of the station, sharing the space with energy-replenishment stations for labor droids.


So with the DS2, it appears they learned from the problems with DS1's laborers, and DS2 was built almost exclusively by construction droids with a much smaller number of sentient workers who lived on-site. Power was provided on-site by the DS2's own functioning reactor, which was the first piece built. And all the raw materials were trucked in to the remote secure site using an armada of transport spacecraft. These factors greatly reduce the amount of infrastructure required.


Also, not to state the obvious, but you're trying to correlate our contemporary human shipbuilding methods with Star Wars' highly advanced sci-fi construction methods that had access to stuff like near-infinite self-replicating construction droids, galaxy-wide material access from thousands of planet, the combined knowledge of thousands of years of construction methods across thousands of alien civilizations, and faster-than-light cross-galaxy materials transport capabilities.

So massive fleets of hyperspace spacecraft and a near-infinite supply of alien-designed droids are totally understandable, but there aren't enough cranes and chow halls/showerhouses for your liking? Who needs cranes and showers when you're relying on flying construction droids that can position massive machinery in place themselves and don't need to eat or shower... Wink
 
Posts: 30371 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by RogueJSK:

So massive fleets of hyperspace spacecraft and a near-infinite supply of alien-designed droids are totally understandable, but there aren't enough cranes and chow halls/showerhouses for your liking? Who needs cranes and showers when you're relying on flying construction droids that can position massive machinery in place themselves and don't need to eat or shower... Wink


Good points, and I freely admit I hadn't thought of everything.

But, God help you if those construction droids unionize. . . Cool



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quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by Hound Dog:
Now, the most unlikely concept for the entire movie to me was how they could build the thing out in the middle of nowhere without any major infrastructure nearby. Construction of even commercial freighters requires massive specialized equipment and skilled workers. Where would all those people sleep? Where were their stockpiles of parts. Heavy equipment (cranes, welders, metal-bending gear, etc), immense power supplies, and other industrial items?


At that point, the Death Star was moved to orbit around Scarif, also a primary construction location for the Empire, as well as one of its most secure. This is where it was finished, using mostly construction droids rather than sentient laborers. In orbit above Scarif is where the Andor post-credit scene is shown, and where Rogue One takes place.

In short, the Death Star was mostly built at one of the largest industrial planets in the galaxy, and then finished at a different major construction location. They had plenty of infrastructure available at either location.

While post-credit scenes generally are pretty fun, I was a bit disappointed by the lack of infrastructure surrounding the Death Star. We know that Scariff is where it was finished and the planet itself is home to major Imperial industry...where was it?
Early EU artwork depicted big production facilities like Kuat Drive Yards and Santhe Shipyards as rings surrounding those planets. Cargo constantly coming & going, cranes, lifts and tugs all about, all manor of fabrication and assembly facilities scattered about the rings as big spaceships were put together. If there's one things people are in awe of that they've never seen, is a shipyard....go to Newport, Bath or, Pascagoula, its fascinating.

We all know Star Wars is deeply flawed when it comes to tactics...of any kind. Every battle is frontal engagements, there's very little military experience or general knowledge amongst the creative staff. Another issue I've always had is Star Wars writers aren't very aware of heavy industry, all we've ever seen (outside of the cartoons) is junkyards; scavengers salvaging parts, busy-bodies cutting and breaking things, smelters turning metal into slag. For the multitude of spaceships, cruisers, freighters and probes, that fly about, we've yet to see a scene showing a big assembly.
 
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Originally posted by corsair:
Another issue I've always had is Star Wars writers aren't very aware of heavy industry, all we've ever seen (outside of the cartoons) is junkyards; scavengers salvaging parts, busy-bodies cutting and breaking things, smelters turning metal into slag. For the multitude of spaceships, cruisers, freighters and probes, that fly about, we've yet to see a scene showing a big assembly.


Well, there's the massive Geonosis battle droid factories from the prequels, and some views in Solo of the huge industrial facilities on Corellia (one of the major shipbuilding planets), including a glimpse of Star Destroyer shield generators being built and then hauled into orbit for installation on ships in the orbiting shipyards.

But while the films have been light on industrial/construction scenes, a number of the shows/games/books/comics have prominently features shipyards, construction yards, and other large industrial sites.

Keep in mind that the films generally haven't taken place on primary Core worlds with heavy industry. They're primarily set in backwater areas devoid of huge populations and major industry. So it's been left up to the other mediums to flesh out the heavily populated and major industrial areas of core worlds like Kuat, Mon Cal, Fresia, Coruscant, etc.

But after all, in stuff like war movies, they generally don't include scenes showing the factories cranking out guns and bullets and tanks but you've gotta assume they were built offscreen somewhere, right? Wink
 
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Finished Andor last night, have avoided this thread to avoid spoilers.

Overall, enjoyed it. Started R1 last night & got to the boom at Jeddah. Going straight from Andor to R1, definitely room for another season to fill the gap.

Will have to go back & see the post credit finale scene.




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quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by corsair:
Another issue I've always had is Star Wars writers aren't very aware of heavy industry, all we've ever seen (outside of the cartoons) is junkyards; scavengers salvaging parts, busy-bodies cutting and breaking things, smelters turning metal into slag. For the multitude of spaceships, cruisers, freighters and probes, that fly about, we've yet to see a scene showing a big assembly.


Well, there's the massive Geonosis battle droid factories from the prequels, and some views in Solo of the huge industrial facilities on Corellia (one of the major shipbuilding planets), including a glimpse of Star Destroyer shield generators being built and then hauled into orbit for installation on ships in the orbiting shipyards.

But while the films have been light on industrial/construction scenes, a number of the shows/games/books/comics have prominently features shipyards, construction yards, and other large industrial sites.

Keep in mind that the films generally haven't taken place on primary Core worlds with heavy industry. They're primarily set in backwater areas devoid of huge populations and major industry. So it's been left up to the other mediums to flesh out the heavily populated and major industrial areas of core worlds like Kuat, Mon Cal, Fresia, Coruscant, etc.

But after all, in stuff like war movies, they generally don't include scenes showing the factories cranking out guns and bullets and tanks but you've gotta assume they were built offscreen somewhere, right? Wink


There is a two part episode in Rebels where the crew go to Geonosis to meet Saw Gurerra. The planet was hit by the Empire to wipe out the bugs. The party meets one bug who survived. Because they cannot understand his language, they misinterpret the warning of a small circle inside a larger one. When the party discovers circular canister with the Empire log that contained the agent that wiped out the bugs, they think they discovered what their new friend was trying to communicate, not that there was a planet killing station being built in secret, and the genocide was to hide that secret.


Lord, your ocean is so very large and my divos are so very f****d-up
Dirt Sailors Unite!
 
Posts: 24829 | Location: NoVa | Registered: May 06, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by P250UA5:
Overall, enjoyed it. Started R1 last night & got to the boom at Jeddah. Going straight from Andor to R1, definitely room for another season to fill the gap.

It was planned from the start as 24 episodes/2 seasons total. The layout is described in this interview with Gilroy. No spoilers just show layout related. Important part is this:

"We fit into all of those very well, but we completely expand on those, and it felt very important, particularly, for someone we're taking on a 5-year journey to be completely invested in their story from their origin to the end," Gilroy explained. The first season of Andor will consist of 12 episodes that span the course of a year in Cassian's life and the journey of the rebellion. The second season will be another 12 episodes, split up into four blocks of three episodes each, with each block representing another year in that 5-year journey Gilroy referenced. "We get to take the formative forging of Cassian Andor in the first 12 episodes...and then we get to run that up in a really exciting narrative fashion. The final scene in the 24th episode of the show will walk you directly into the first scene in Rogue One," he said
 
Posts: 561 | Location: Colorado via South Louisiana | Registered: September 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Infidel
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Originally posted by Hound Dog:
But, God help you if those construction droids unionize. . . Cool


Well, you certainly don't want them ionized. Then they spark and quit working.




I hate offended people. They come in two flavours - huffy and whiny - and it's hard to know which is worst. The huffy ones are self-important, narcissistic authoritarians in love with the sound of their own booming disapproval, while the whiny, sparrowlike ones are so annoying and sickly and ill-equipped for life on Earth you just want to smack them round the head until they stop crying and grow up.
- Charlie Brooker
 
Posts: 610 | Location: Sammamish, WA | Registered: May 14, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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