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Suggestions for eating fish for one who “doesn’t like seafood” Login/Join 
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Picture of konata88
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I love salmon especially with copper river available.

But to get acclimated, I’m going to go with firm yet mild white fish.

Halibut filet comes to mind. Fish and chips (cod or pollock). Petrale sole is readily available around here. I generally stick with wild; I don’t buy farmed fish. US or Canada. I’m averse to seafood from south east Asia. Japan or Korea is okay. Japan is excellent actually.

I’m gonna add Chilean sea bass. Cooked delicate. Like poached/baked in butter slowly. Supermarket or Costco has - in the fresh seafood section as well as frozen freezer section. Both are good but fresh fridge one are better (usually vacuum sealed in pairs).

Teriyaki sauce: soy sauce, sake, sugar, butter. Reduce to desired viscosity. Easy on the soy sauce.




"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." - B.Franklin
"Wrong does not cease to be wrong because the majority share in it." L.Tolstoy
 
Posts: 10953 | Location: In the gilded cage | Registered: December 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Team Apathy
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Ok, results:

It was delicious. Perhaps a smidge overdone as it was a tad dry in some places but far better than chicken breast.

Both kids that tried it liked it and came back for another bite.

I’d like to try a teriyaki flavored one as that is one of my wife’s favorite flavor profiles. Recipes welcome!

 
Posts: 5937 | Location: Modesto, CA | Registered: January 27, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I’m very fortunate to live on the Great Lakes, was raised on Walleye, perch, blue gills and crappie, when we went to Michigan it was White Fish and Salmon. Store bought I would recommend Halibut or Sea Bass as someone else mentioned. Fresh of course. I hope you find something that you like!! We’re doing Mahi Mahi and a couple fresh tuna steaks tonight, once you find your comfort zone with eating fish and how to prepare it, you’ll be amazed at how well it can all taste if prepared right! Best of luck
 
Posts: 202 | Location: Marblehead ohio | Registered: January 05, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of konata88
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Looks good. Atlantic salmon is usually farmed salmon. Out here, I’ve only seen wild salmon from pacific. The light color is typical of Atlantic farmed salmon.

Skin: a few options. Scale it well unless you going to remove and toss it.
Leave it on. Eat or don’t eat.
Or leave it on, peel off after cooking. Make it crispy by simmering both sides in butter. Salmon skin senbei.
Or peel off and simmer in butter - crispy salmon skin senbei.




"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." - B.Franklin
"Wrong does not cease to be wrong because the majority share in it." L.Tolstoy
 
Posts: 10953 | Location: In the gilded cage | Registered: December 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Smarter than the
average bear
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Good fish is generally not slimy. As it ages, becomes more slimy. It generally shouldn't smell "fishy". So if you're buying fresh fish, make sure it looks clean and fresh, and it should smell pretty neutral.

Frozen fish may be best for you, because you know it's fresh, if you understand my logic. Fish generally freezes well, and defrosts quickly. It should be frozen when fresh. So there's no guessing how old it is.

As others have said, farm raised fish is somewhat suspect, but not absolutely so.

When eating fish filets (no bones), be careful for bones. Also, fish dependent. Atlantic salmon fillets you'll likely have no bones. Buy sockeye salmon and the fillets will still have some bones-best to be pulled before cooking.

Skin on is fine for cooking, and simply eat the flesh out of the skin. Depending on the fish, some will have been scaled (scales removed), and you can eat the crispy skin as well.

One last thing that comes to mind-watch for a "blood line". Most easily noticed in white fish flesh, a darker line of reddish flesh, while edible, may taste a little fishier, so you might want to avoid it.
 
Posts: 3026 | Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana | Registered: June 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posting without pants
Picture of KevinCW
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Try some baked or grilled salmon. (I usually do it in a glass baking dish. Sprinkle it with Lemon-pepper seasoning and bake it, skin side down, for 15 to 20 mins at 350 or 375.

Goes good with green beans or asparagus.

I also like cod chunks, they are in the frozen section and breaded like the fish sticks you like, but I like the chunks better.

I have good luck going to Sams CLub or Costco and buying whole salmon filets and cutting the portions up myself, seasoning them, and putting them in freezer bags.

Makes for a quick meal through the week, just thaw them, pop them in a baking pan, and make dinner.





Strive to live your life so when you wake up in the morning and your feet hit the floor, the devil says "Oh crap, he's up."
 
Posts: 33076 | Location: St. Louis MO | Registered: February 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of mdblanton
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Another method which may help with texture is to make croquettes - salmon works well: Salmon Croquettes

Easy way to make patties to eat alone or on a bun. I've also made similar using both shrimp and fish (usually a white fish of some sort).
 
Posts: 898 | Location: Petal, MS | Registered: January 21, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
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quote:
Originally posted by thumperfbc:
quote:
Originally posted by trapper189:
Tuna steaks. Completely unlike any of the fish listed so far.


How so? I had a package of frozen ahi tuna steaks from Trader Joe’s in hand, but I passed for now because I hadn’t heard much about them in this thread.

I picked up a frozen 5 ounce Atlantic salmon packaged with lemon herb butter. Will try that chest. It is skin on, so I should cut that off?

Cooked properly, the texture of tuna steak is more like steak than fish.

Salmon has a strong flavor. Since you tried and enjoyed it, you are good to go for any other fish mentioned.
 
Posts: 8115 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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tuna
halibut
Grouper
Snapper
flounder
chilean sea bass

none of these should be "fishy," just firm white meat


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Live today as if it may be your last and learn today as if you will live forever
 
Posts: 5772 | Location: New Orleans...outside the levees, fishing in the Rigolets | Registered: October 11, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you like salmon, you will just LOVE halibut!! I don't like/eat salmon, black cod, and the like.....just too fishy for my taste. Fresh tuna and halibut is just fine for me.

My fishing trips to Alaska brought back halibut and king crab.
 
Posts: 6105 | Location: Az | Registered: May 27, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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As someone who grew up catching and eating seafood from the Gulf Coast, my advice is don't buy fish from places with little to no pollution controls. By American seafood or stuff from clean places like Norway.

I spent time for work at the ports in Shanghai and Tianjin and at Boha Bay. I would never eat anything that came out of that water. I have pics from the top of the TV tower in Shanghai were you couldn't see a mile. I would not eat Tilapia from China.

For some really good fish recipes try some South Louisiana recipes like:

Redfish on the half shell - fillets in the skin and scales (one fillet cut up the spine), grilled scale side down with a baste of butter, lemon, and garlic.
Speckled Trout Almandine - spec fillets dredged in flour, pan fried in butter, and topped with a butter/lemon/almond sauce - Classic New Orleans.
Trout Meuniere - pan fried trout (saltwater), topped with a sauce of butter, lemon, Worcestershire, and parsley.
BBQ Shrimp New Orleans Style - not that sauce you put on burgers.
Shrimp Etoufee - a roux based sauce with tomatoes, bell peppers, onion, celery and shrimp - served over rice.
Broiled Stuffed Flounder - crab meat stuffing in a broiled, deboned fresh flounder. Hard to beat.
Fried soft shelled crabs - perhaps one of the richest things you can eat. Take care where you eat this as freshness is key.


+
 
Posts: 2710 | Location: Unass the AO | Registered: December 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His Royal Hiney
Picture of Rey HRH
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quote:
Originally posted by PASig:
People who "who don't like fish" because "it's fishy" often have been ruined early in their lives by BAD FISH, fish that is either old or spoiled and they think all fish is like that.



Yep. I eat fish. I also like to make wisecracks. One time, a waitress asked how was my food. I forget what fish I ordered but I said it tastes fishy. She said, "I'm sorry." and turned around. I thought she didn't get the joke. Next thing I know, I see the chef come out with a concerned look on his face. I waved him off.

My wife explained that fish that tastes fishy is bad fish. I thought I made a good joke.



"It did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us. We needed to stop asking about the meaning of life, and instead to think of ourselves as those who were being questioned by life – daily and hourly. Our answer must consist not in talk and meditation, but in right action and in right conduct. Life ultimately means taking the responsibility to find the right answer to its problems and to fulfill the tasks which it constantly sets for each individual." Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning, 1946.
 
Posts: 17731 | Location: The Free State of Arizona - Ditat Deus | Registered: March 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
always with a hat or sunscreen
Picture of bald1
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I enjoy good fresh fish and as many have already commented I avoid farm raised.


Halibut (especially cheeks)
Chilean Sea Bass
Wild Alaskan Salmon
Mahi Mahi
Shark steaks
Tuna steaks (yellow fin, etc.)
Swordfish steaks
Barramudi (Asian sea bass)
Haddock
Cod
Lemon Sole
Red Snapper
Walleye


Then of course there are shellfish but they're a whole different category.



Certifiable member of the gun toting, septuagenarian, bucket list workin', crazed retiree, bald is beautiful club!
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Posts: 14318 | Location: Black Hills of South Dakota | Registered: June 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
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quote:
Originally posted by GT-40DOC:
My fishing trips to Alaska brought back halibut and king crab.


I hear some people go to Alaska just for the halibut.
 
Posts: 8115 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by ZSMICHAEL:
Salmon on the grill.
Even easier is Salmon in an air fryer.

Smear a thin layer of mustard on the fish and then sprinkle your favorite seasoning and simply cook it. In my air fryer it takes 10 minutes. (fish setting is 8 on mine but Salmon is thick)

I don't even care if you don't like mustard you can't taste it but it makes the seasoning stick and doesn't burn like most sugar based sauces.
 
Posts: 3094 | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Happily Retired
Picture of Bassamatic
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Good thread. Sam's Club has wild caught Atlantic salmon that is cut into meal sized chunks, individually flash frozen and then each is sealed air tight . I think a bag is something like 30 bucks. We like it.



.....never marry a woman who is mean to your waitress.
 
Posts: 4546 | Location: Lake of the Ozarks, MO. | Registered: September 05, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of SigSentry
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If I get a craving for fish it might be cod for poor man's lobster or some salmon. I also thought you might like scallops prepared correctly.
 
Posts: 2819 | Registered: May 30, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Drill Here, Drill Now
Picture of tatortodd
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quote:
Originally posted by thumperfbc:
It is skin on, so I should cut that off?
When I lived in Alaska, a cookbook author had a teaching kitchen and I took a few classes from her. Here are a couple salmon cooking tips I picked up from her and use to this day:
  • Cook in 400 degree oven or grill
  • Place the salmon skin side down on heavy duty tinfoil. Do NOT put cooking spray, butter, or oil on tinfoil.
  • Place foil side down in preheated oven pan or on grill grate. Do NOT flip.
  • Cook to a medium-rare or medium
  • Here is the key for plating: there is a fat layer between the skin and the meat. Push a spatula into the fat layer lifting up the meat and leaving behind the skin. Plate the meat and throw away the foil and skin. This is why the earlier step didn't have anything nonstick as you want the skin to stick to the foil.



    Ego is the anesthesia that deadens the pain of stupidity

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    Posts: 20988 | Location: N. Houston, TX | Registered: November 14, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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    Picture of valkyrie1
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    I wouldn’t touch tilapia especially from Asia. https://www.healthline.com/nut...fish#TOC_TITLE_HDR_5…..Branzino is an excellent mild fish also
     
    Posts: 2157 | Location: Florida | Registered: March 01, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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    Three pages on seafood and no one mentions sushi?

    That said, if you trod that path, have a guide the first time. One who knows the better place to go, and can guide you on the menu.


    --
    I always prefer reality when I can figure out what it is.
    JALLEN 10/18/18
     
    Posts: 2227 | Location: Roswell, GA | Registered: March 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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