SIGforum.com    Main Page  Hop To Forum Categories  SIG Pistols    Flork's Lubrication Recommendation
Page 1 ... 25 26 27 28

Moderators: Chris Orndorff, LDD
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Flork's Lubrication Recommendation Login/Join 
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Brewer3401:
Been using TW25B because SIG recommended it. Now SIG recommends Lucas.
One of my guns (P226) has over 27,000 rounds through it and the frame has no visible wear, other than a couple of shiny spots on the top about an inch from the front - using TW25B
I'm open to anything better.
I use CLP to clean, then use 91% rubbing alcohol to degrease, then the TW25B.
Anyone see any potential problem with this procedure, please advise.

Just read your post today. What I do is reversed from your cleaning technique. I clean with alcohol first, then clp tthen the grease.
Why do you use clp first befor the alcohol?
 
Posts: 444 | Location: San Antonio, TX | Registered: October 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Junior Member
posted Hide Post
How about Mobile 1 synthetic grease. I have a new Spartan 1911 I want to treat right!
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: July 11, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
When oil is mentioned for the slide & rails, the answer is usually, "it's not thick enough/doesn't stay put", or "it's a cleaner".
Not much, if anything, has been said about the use of thick oils, such as Slip 2000 EWL 30.
Wilson used to make a thick oil, but not sure if they still do?
I tried some of the EWL 30 on my Dan Wesson A2 1911, and although I haven't got above 100 rounds in a session, the results are positive.
My plan is to continue using the EWL 30, and keep an eye on it as I increase the round count, to ensure that the oil is staying put.
It's a little easier to clean up oil, as opposed to grease, so as long as it stays wet, all should be fine.

How many of you like the heavy oils?
 
Posts: 187 | Location: SE Louisiana  | Registered: August 29, 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Ripley
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by titus66:

How many of you like the heavy oils?


I use grease but you remind me of something I've had for decades. It's a very heavy oil designed for bike sprockets and chains, not supposed to be thrown off by the rotation and movement. It's called Phil's Tenacious Oil.

I can't speak to its performance in very hot or cold conditions, it could be an interesting alternative. Maybe someone else familiar with it or similar products could chime in.

*edit* I see it's still available on ebay, not sure if it's still the same formulation. I do remember the stuff I had performed as advertised.


___________________________

Set the controls for the heart of the Sun.
 
Posts: 5073 | Location: Columbia, Illinois | Registered: December 25, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Junior Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by wizard1911:
How about Mobile 1 synthetic grease. I have a new Spartan 1911 I want to treat right!

Not bad. I use mobile 1 and no complaint at all. https://theeffectiveguide.com/...ynthetic-oil-review/ It is good brand for synthetic oil.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: cestkro,


.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: October 02, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Flork: Along with others here, I began using the reddish, Mobil 1 auto grease for my many semi-autos.

If you Do recommend Mobil 1 (or see nothing wrong) for handguns, would you use your favorite handgun grease for Imported AKs etc you want to keep in good condition?
 
Posts: 5 | Location: Lakeland TN. | Registered: December 20, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Fusternc
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Laufer:
Flork: Along with others here, I began using the reddish, Mobil 1 auto grease for my many semi-autos.

If you Do recommend Mobil 1 (or see nothing wrong) for handguns, would you use your favorite handgun grease for Imported AKs etc you want to keep in good condition?


I use Supertech Multiduty complex grease (red grease) from Walmart ($4.97 per 14 oz container) on my AK and it works fantastic.
 
Posts: 1150 | Location: New Hampshire | Registered: December 05, 1999Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Thanks Fusternc:

The WalMart grease might have similar properties.
 
Posts: 5 | Location: Lakeland TN. | Registered: December 20, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Fusternc
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Laufer:
Thanks Fusternc:

The WalMart grease might have similar properties.


I have also used it on my over and under shotgun and had equally great results. Much better than the lithium grease I had used briefly in the past.
 
Posts: 1150 | Location: New Hampshire | Registered: December 05, 1999Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Fusternc
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by titus66:
When oil is mentioned for the slide & rails, the answer is usually, "it's not thick enough/doesn't stay put", or "it's a cleaner".
Not much, if anything, has been said about the use of thick oils, such as Slip 2000 EWL 30.
Wilson used to make a thick oil, but not sure if they still do?
I tried some of the EWL 30 on my Dan Wesson A2 1911, and although I haven't got above 100 rounds in a session, the results are positive.
My plan is to continue using the EWL 30, and keep an eye on it as I increase the round count, to ensure that the oil is staying put.
It's a little easier to clean up oil, as opposed to grease, so as long as it stays wet, all should be fine.

How many of you like the heavy oils?


I have recently discovered Lucas Extreme Weapon lube (thicker oil) and my handgun slides’ action has never felt so smooth. Its my goto oil now.
 
Posts: 1150 | Location: New Hampshire | Registered: December 05, 1999Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Gambit
posted Hide Post
I'm still using the containers of STOS that I bought at Graf's in St Charles, MO., around 1995, on all my pistols and revolvers, along with 3 in 1 Oil. I used Rem Oil for a while and liked it, too.
I use lithium grease (for the most part) on all my rifles whether milsurp or modern, bolt or auto. Oh yea, I use 3 in 1 on them , too.
I do pretty much follow Flork's instructions on where the STOS (or grease) should be applied. No damage yet.


________________________
"Red hair and black leather, my favorite color scheme"
 
Posts: 596 | Location: Acadiana | Registered: February 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I just bought a bottle of Wilson Combat weapon grease . Haven't tried it yet .
 
Posts: 1520 | Location: The deep South | Registered: February 27, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
A couple of notes come to mind after reading this l-o-n-g thread:
1. Just because a certain grade of plain white Lubriplate grease was the correct lubricant on the Garand in WWII, means little today unless you are caring for a Garand! Weapons and lubricants have come a long way in over 70+ years. After all, do you use the single-weight, non-detergent oil of that era in your car's crankcase today?
2. 91% isopropyl alcohol is a good, safe cleaner (but flammable) but mainly as the very final step in cleaning. It is not a particularly good solvent for a lot of greases and oils, partly because of the chemical nature of this particular alcohol, but mainly due to the nearly 10% water content. A better, and still safe cleaner/solvent, and one which I frequently use after cleaning but before applying any new lubricant, is naphtha. You can use the smaller cans meant to feed lighters, or buy a quart at a paint store for much better deal. It affects few plastics, and leave a very clean surface.
3. One can sometimes safely mix oils or greases. For instance, some shooters like Mobil One motor oil as a lubricant as a gun oil, but wish it was produced in a thucker grade. You can make just such a grade by mixing in a small amount of the original formula STP (blue bottle) until the desired viscosity is reached. This way, you can obtain many of the qualities of a grease using your favorite oil as a base. The same is true of Lubegard products (check Amazon) which are mainly marketed to the automotive repsir trade and fleets. Their products mostly contain a special, patented wax ester, and can be added to the crankcase or tranny. They have a lot of potential for modifying gun oils and greases, too, IMHO. The company now markets a gun oil but hasn't come out with a grease. The wax ester mimics many of the properties of sperm whale oil, which was for msny years considered the very best fine lubricant available (it is now difficult or impoosible to legally obtain).
4. There are a lot of decent lubricants on the market, and most are quite similar to one another. The single best source for sorting them out is Grant Cunningham's article (Google it). He brings the talented gunsmith's eye and a lot of good sense to the table. As a chemistry professor of some years experience, and a special interest in fats and other lipids, I think his essay will get you thinking straight about what you need to to properly lube a firearm. If you don't grasp the underlying ideas, you will just run after first this, than that will o' the wisp as they come on the market and are touted along with the other snake oils. You can actually boil your requirements down to three or four products, period. For many people, that can even be just two products.


Brian
 
Posts: 17 | Location: Charlotte, NC | Registered: July 27, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of cokehockey
posted Hide Post
Great read and knowledge right here. Thanks


Favorite SIGS:
P224 9mm SAS DA/SA
P226 Legion DA/SA
P226 West German (1988) 9mm
P227 Carry
 
Posts: 17 | Location: Las Vegas, NV | Registered: February 03, 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
FYI, stay away from the Lubri-Kit store, mentioned in Grant Cunningham’s article. It seems I’ve been shafted by them. Placed an order on 8-8-18,and have heard nothing from them, and can’t reach them.
If you want Lubriplate products, go to their site, and look under ‘Outdoorsman Products’, they have the grease & oil that he recommended.
 
Posts: 187 | Location: SE Louisiana  | Registered: August 29, 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of lingham
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Brianm14:
A couple of notes come to mind after reading this l-o-n-g thread:
1. Just because a certain grade of plain white Lubriplate grease was the correct lubricant on the Garand in WWII, means little today unless you are caring for a Garand! Weapons and lubricants have come a long way in over 70+ years. After all, do you use the single-weight, non-detergent oil of that era in your car's crankcase today?
2. 91% isopropyl alcohol is a good, safe cleaner (but flammable) but mainly as the very final step in cleaning. It is not a particularly good solvent for a lot of greases and oils, partly because of the chemical nature of this particular alcohol, but mainly due to the nearly 10% water content. A better, and still safe cleaner/solvent, and one which I frequently use after cleaning but before applying any new lubricant, is naphtha. You can use the smaller cans meant to feed lighters, or buy a quart at a paint store for much better deal. It affects few plastics, and leave a very clean surface.
3. One can sometimes safely mix oils or greases. For instance, some shooters like Mobil One motor oil as a lubricant as a gun oil, but wish it was produced in a thucker grade. You can make just such a grade by mixing in a small amount of the original formula STP (blue bottle) until the desired viscosity is reached. This way, you can obtain many of the qualities of a grease using your favorite oil as a base. The same is true of Lubegard products (check Amazon) which are mainly marketed to the automotive repsir trade and fleets. Their products mostly contain a special, patented wax ester, and can be added to the crankcase or tranny. They have a lot of potential for modifying gun oils and greases, too, IMHO. The company now markets a gun oil but hasn't come out with a grease. The wax ester mimics many of the properties of sperm whale oil, which was for msny years considered the very best fine lubricant available (it is now difficult or impoosible to legally obtain).
4. There are a lot of decent lubricants on the market, and most are quite similar to one another. The single best source for sorting them out is Grant Cunningham's article (Google it). He brings the talented gunsmith's eye and a lot of good sense to the table. As a chemistry professor of some years experience, and a special interest in fats and other lipids, I think his essay will get you thinking straight about what you need to to properly lube a firearm. If you don't grasp the underlying ideas, you will just run after first this, than that will o' the wisp as they come on the market and are touted along with the other snake oils. You can actually boil your requirements down to three or four products, period. For many people, that can even be just two products.


I have been using Lubriplate on all of my weapons since 1968 and never had a problem. I have seen friends and aquaintences who have used other lubricants and most of them have the so called "smile's" on their barrels and the frames show wear. I have put many thousands of rounds through my favorite sig (P229) and the barrel has no "smiley's" at all. The springs have been changed by Sig several times but the P229 shows no wear.
You can believe what you want and say that Lubriplate is an out dated lubricant and granted, many new ones may actualy have very good or even better lubricating properties but lubriplate has worked fine for me for 50 years. JMHO



GOD, Family, Country
 
Posts: 30 | Location: Florida | Registered: July 08, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 ... 25 26 27 28 
 

SIGforum.com    Main Page  Hop To Forum Categories  SIG Pistols    Flork's Lubrication Recommendation

© SIGforum 2018