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Picture of sourdough44
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I recently bought a Kimber 3” revolver, 357 mag. There is a thread in the handgun section. That has lead to getting out some 38 & 357 reloading supplies. So far I have loaded up some 38 +p loads with 125 grain plated bullets.

My plan is to load more of those, then move to lower end 357 loads with 130 grain jacketed bullets. I was using Win-231 powder, plan to move to H Universal for the 357 loads.

Between this new Kimber, a S&W Model 60, & my 340PD, lower end 357 loads will be handy.

I shot some Remington factory 357 loads in the Kimber, kinda stout but controllable.

Since I didn’t have a good holster match, a DeSantis from Midway comes tomorrow.
 
Posts: 4900 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I started with Unique and moved to W231. I've never been super happy with any of my loads. Just always seems like there is always too much smoke.

I've got some Blue Dot that I want to try next for a mid .357 load. 125 grain jacketed. I've also got some old VV that I need to try one of these days before it goes bad.

I wish I had some advice to offer, but I'm no expert in this area. Like I stated, I've never been happy with my .38 or .357 loads.

I have a bit of a reloading phobia, so I'm afraid to really do anything other than mid-powered loads. I've seen too many people screw up and damage guns from overpressure, or just plain get bullets stuck in barrels from not enough powder.


.
 
Posts: 9250 | Location: The Beaver State | Registered: February 28, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Delta-3
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I don't shoot 357 but I do reload 38's. I've found that the HS-6 I've used for my 45 ACP for decades works extremely well in 38 Special in all weight classes from 110g-158g. It is very accurate out of any S&W revolver I own.


Rom 13:4 If you do evil, be afraid. For he does not bear the sword in vain. For he is God's minister, an avenger to execute wrath on him who practices evil.
 
Posts: 478 | Location: NW Ohio but Montana is always home. | Registered: September 30, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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These will be mostly with lighter, short barrel revolvers. That’s the reason for low end 357 loads, but above 38 +p.

The very 1st round I started with was 38/357 with the Lee kit where you use a mallet.

I shot some full power 357 loads with the 3” Kimber, factory. They were controllable, but more than needed, with a fair amount of flash.

Just read another article about current ammo scarcity, luckily I have most components to make my own.
 
Posts: 4900 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of maxwayne
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I loaded some 125gr jhp's with 231 in 357 cases. I used 2 grains less than what WW recommended. They still seemed pretty stout.
 
Posts: 5111 | Registered: March 04, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of sigcrazy7
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Whenever I want a lighter 357 load, I load 38spcl+P because I prefer higher density loads. I'm always nervous about low density loads in larger cases.

Also, many powders get very dirty when you load them light. I've never tried Universal, but I've found the "Dots" & Unique to be very dirty when loaded light. I'm curious about how W244 performs in the 38/357. It's marketed as a cleaner alternative to 231.



Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and you will go on well. -Epictetus
 
Posts: 7130 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, right now my dies & bullet seating are set up for the 38 loads. I’ll for sure make a bunch more at the +p level before setting up 357.

I’m much more likely to use, shoot, & carry those, plus I have some factory 357 loads around should the need arise.
 
Posts: 4900 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sourdough44:
luckily I have most components to make my own.


All components are scarce. I hope you don't lack primers.


Unhappy ammo seeker
 
Posts: 17913 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: February 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have plenty of primers. The largest use has been prairie dogging reloads & trips, consumes lots of SR primers.

I was out a month ago, saw primers at $53 per 1 k at a semi-local shop. That’s not the <$40 price I think is reasonable, but bought some anyway.

I don’t expect fully stock shelves soon, seems like a little better supply recently.
 
Posts: 4900 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of sigcrazy7
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Did your dies come with a .125" washer for switching between 38/357 without changing your dies?



Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and you will go on well. -Epictetus
 
Posts: 7130 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Flash-LB
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quote:
Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
Did your dies come with a .125" washer for switching between 38/357 without changing your dies?


If they didn't, go down to Home Depot or Ace or Lowe's and pick up 3 of them.
 
Posts: 7078 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
Did your dies come with a .125" washer for switching between 38/357 without changing your dies?


The problem there is, the difference between .38 and .357 is 0.135".
If you get the die spacer kit from a reloading die company, there will be a .135" .38-.357, a .125" .44 Special to Magnum, and a .0625" to not crimp in the seating die; although it will upset your seating by that much.
 
Posts: 3007 | Location: Florence, Alabama, USA | Registered: July 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Jim Watson:
quote:
Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
Did your dies come with a .125" washer for switching between 38/357 without changing your dies?


The problem there is, the difference between .38 and .357 is 0.135".
If you get the die spacer kit from a reloading die company, there will be a .135" .38-.357, a .125" .44 Special to Magnum, and a .0625" to not crimp in the seating die; although it will upset your seating by that much.


No, the difference between them is 0.125", not 0.135".

https://winchester.com/Blog/20...ecial-Vs-the-357-Mag

The resulting cartridge was named the 357 Magnum. However, the internal pressures that resulted could dangerously destroy older guns intended for the less powerful 38 Special, so the 357 Magnum’s case was re-designed 1/8th-inch longer to prevent it from being loaded into a 38 Special revolver.
 
Posts: 7078 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You generally don't need to use a spacer, as most dies can be adjusted for either size case. I think the spacer is only provided by some manufacturers for people who want to try to switch back and forth without re-setting the die lock ring. At least this has been my experience with various brand die sets to reload 38/357, 44SPL/44Mag, and 45 Colt/45 S&W.
 
Posts: 2056 | Location: WI | Registered: December 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bigwagon:
You generally don't need to use a spacer, as most dies can be adjusted for either size case. I think the spacer is only provided by some manufacturers for people who want to try to switch back and forth without re-setting the die lock ring. At least this has been my experience with various brand die sets to reload 38/357, 44SPL/44Mag, and 45 Colt/45 S&W.


That's exactly what it's for. You nailed it.
 
Posts: 7078 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by radioman:

I've got some Blue Dot that I want to try next for a mid .357 load. 125 grain jacketed.

From Alliant's website
During the latest review Alliant Powder discovered that Alliant Powder's Blue Dot® should not be used in the following applications:

Blue Dot® should NOT be used in the 357 Magnum load using the 125 grain projectile (Blue Dot® recipes with heavier bullet weights as specified in Alliant Powders Reloading Guide are acceptable for use).
Blue Dot® should NOT be used in the 41 Magnum cartridge (all bullet weights).
Use of Blue Dot® in the above cases may cause a high pressure situation that could cause property damage and serious personal injury.
 
Posts: 43 | Location: Long Island | Registered: September 30, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Flash-LB:
quote:
Originally posted by bigwagon:
You generally don't need to use a spacer, as most dies can be adjusted for either size case. I think the spacer is only provided by some manufacturers for people who want to try to switch back and forth without re-setting the die lock ring. At least this has been my experience with various brand die sets to reload 38/357, 44SPL/44Mag, and 45 Colt/45 S&W.


That's exactly what it's for. You nailed it.

I should have also mentioned that in my experience, this rarely works anyway, especially when trying to set the crimp, which usually requires a bit of fine tuning regardless of case length. For that reason alone, I have acquired many spare die sets and seating dies so I can have dedicated seaters and crimpers for each of the cartridges. For example, I have at least three full sets of 45LC dies, with set ups for 45 Colt and 45 Schofield, each with a separate seater and crimp die. I have a LOT of dies!!
 
Posts: 2056 | Location: WI | Registered: December 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Flash-LB
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quote:
Originally posted by bigwagon:
I should have also mentioned that in my experience, this rarely works anyway, especially when trying to set the crimp, which usually requires a bit of fine tuning regardless of case length. For that reason alone, I have acquired many spare die sets and seating dies so I can have dedicated seaters and crimpers for each of the cartridges. For example, I have at least three full sets of 45LC dies, with set ups for 45 Colt and 45 Schofield, each with a separate seater and crimp die. I have a LOT of dies!!


I'm sorry it doesn't work for you. It worked for me for around 25 years or so, then I switched to a progressive press with dedicated turrets and it became a moot point.
 
Posts: 7078 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Flash-LB:

No, the difference between them is 0.125", not 0.135".

https://winchester.com/Blog/20...ecial-Vs-the-357-Mag

The resulting cartridge was named the 357 Magnum. However, the internal pressures that resulted could dangerously destroy older guns intended for the less powerful 38 Special, so the 357 Magnum’s case was re-designed 1/8th-inch longer to prevent it from being loaded into a 38 Special revolver.


No, that advertisement written by some clerk is what is wrong.
Reference to SAAMI specifications show

.357 1.290" case length
.38. 1.155" case length

1.290 - 1.155 = 0.135"

Redding thinks so, too; in their Midway advertisement:

Redding Die Spacers allow for quick compensation for case length, partial resizing, or to make a no-crimp adjustment without the need to move the locking rings. Kit contains a no-crimp or partial resizing spacer (.062), a 44 Special/44 Magnum spacer (.125) and a 38 Special/357 Magnum spacer (.135). Fits all 7/8" - 14 Dies.
 
Posts: 3007 | Location: Florence, Alabama, USA | Registered: July 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of sigcrazy7
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Whatever the actual spacing goes is, the point is that a spacer allows you to avoid changing your dies. I have a set of shims. They go from a few thousandths on up. Can’t remember where I got them.



Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and you will go on well. -Epictetus
 
Posts: 7130 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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