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Hey all-

I am curious to know the Forum's opinion on the idea of multiple single stage presses set up to perform individual functions vs a turret press like a Redding T-7.

I have a Rockchucker and a Partner presses. I'm trying to decide if I should keep them, decap on the Partner then size and seat on the Rockchucker or sell them both and move all operations over to a Redding T-7.

It would be nice to leave the dies set up and dialed in on the turret. I definitely don't want to buy a third single stage press and that's the only way I could see to not have to swap dies in and out of the Rockchucker. I only want to decap on the Partner, not resize, because I like to use a universal decapper to decap before tumbling.

What would you do?


Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4173 | Location: AK-49 | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Prepared for the Worst, Providing the Best
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If you have the room, I don't see the problem with the multiple single-stage approach. Another option is setting a single-stage up to use Hornady Lock-N-Load quick-change bushings. The insert will work in most presses (I have mine installed in a Lee Classic Cast), you set the dies up in the bushing, then simply twist them in and out of the press as needed. They retain their configured geometry relative to the press, so no need to change anything unless you're changing components.

I started reloading on a Lee Classic Turret, then added an LNL progressive, and finally a Lee Single-Stage with the LNL bushings. I still use the turret since I already have it, but had I known about the bushing option from the beginning, I'd have likely just done that instead. It takes up less space on the bench, and there's no perceptible play between the bushing and the press when they're locked in, unlike the turret which is kinda sloppy (Lee says it doesn't matter because the shellholder indexes against the bottom of the die...and that makes sense...but it just "feels" less precise).
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1012999418
 
Posts: 5054 | Location: In the Cornfields | Registered: May 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a Forster Co-Ax, RCBS Big Max, and a RCBS Rockchucker side by side. Size on one, move the case to another to swage primer pockets, or size a pistol case on one and expand on another. Seat bullets on one and crimp
on the other. So one case gets fully processed before putting it down. My preferred method. I've used a Lyman turret years ago and see no benefit over multiple presses except saving space. Only thing is I had a Partner press and hated it. Too light duty. My Rockchucker replaced it. The Forster Co-Ax is handy also because you can slide dies in and out preadjusted. One issue with using multiple presses is you may want multiple die sets?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: rg1,
 
Posts: 112 | Registered: May 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I recently started reloading 9mm , I was sizing and decapping on my single stage, taking forever than I realized how much better my LNL AP was and started sizing and decapping on it and it was so much easier, no time at all to size 1200 of them in the time it took me to do 500 on the single.
 
Posts: 252 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: January 11, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
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I'd much rather use a turret than multiple single stages, but that's just me.
 
Posts: 7402 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Turret minimizes the required bench space compared to multiple singles, and perhaps $ as well depending on what you’re buying. One advantage singles might have is if you’re reloading very large rifle calibers since singles tend to have very rigid frames and turrets somewhat less so due to the requirement the head rotate. Either will work so it really comes down to personal preference.
 
Posts: 820 | Location: NE Indiana  | Registered: January 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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On my Redding T-7, I have:
1- Whidden meplat fixer-upper
2- Sinclair Mandrel die
3- Redding Comparator with analog dial
4- Redding s/b S-type bushing die
5- Redding Competition bullet seating die
6- Universal decapper
7- Empty slot

This is all for 308 Winchester. I use the sizing die to decap and resize, but I sometimes use the decapper by itself. The comparator is one slot away from the sizing die because I frequently check. The mandrel is used to prep virgin brass, but being old and decrepit, I have been known to drop a resized case on the floor and a quick short jab with the mandrel rounds out the rim of the case.

The T7 is built to handle big cases.

Just as a note, I usually do one operation at a time; like all sizing, or all seating.
 
Posts: 3309 | Location: Texas | Registered: June 20, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The answer lies in what you are trying to achieve.

Pistol Ammo for range fodder?? Get a progressive. Best bet, buy a Dillon.

Carbine/AR15 Rifle Ammo?? Get a progressive. Best bet, buy a Dillon.

Hunting Rifle Ammo?? Sure a Turret press will get the job done.

Precision Rifle with a concern for extreme accuracy and quality repeatability/control?? Single stage all day long. At this level most precision dies have micrometers for seating and sizing. Thus, set the die with a lock ring and dial the micrometer for precision. Measure each and every time. The long range game is about limiting the accuracy to 0.001"s or 0.05gr.

Go put your hands on a turret press and you'll find that you can rock the turret. Yes, even the Redding ones have slop in them. That translates to inconsistencies in reloading.

Think about the end goal. Then buy accordingly.

Andrew



Duty is the sublimest word in the English Language - Gen Robert E Lee.
 
Posts: 815 | Registered: May 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am doing this for extreme precision. I do not plan on doing multiple operations to a single case, at one sitting. I plan to do one operation for many cases (sizing, seating) at a session, then move to the next operation on those many cases. I am trying to avoid die swapping in the process of doing all those different things. I like the idea of dialing in my sizing or seating die and leaving it be.
I do have the Inline Fabrication quick change press mount to easily swap single stage presses out. I will eventually run out of wall space to hang all the presses, though.

Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4173 | Location: AK-49 | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have loaded 10s of thousands of precision rounds in 300WM, 7mmRM, 308, 6.5CM, 6Dasher, and 223 Rem. All on a single Rock Chucker. I set my dies and use a Hornady Sure lock ring. It keeps the measurements in the general neighborhood. Then I verify each and every measurement by caliper - Headspace, length, seating depth. I achieve SD of 3 or less consistently. And have had a 10 shot SD of 1.4.

Personally, going from press to press is not optimal as each has its own inherent error rate and by jumping from press to press you compound those.

Loading more or faster usually gets you more inconsistency.

Andrew



Duty is the sublimest word in the English Language - Gen Robert E Lee.
 
Posts: 815 | Registered: May 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You could buy a Lee hand press and de-cap on that, freeing up the Partner.

Through unfortunate events I came into a near new turret press, though I don't recall now which brand. I didn't keep it as I didn't like the tiny bit of up and down play it had in the turret.


_____________________________________________________
Sliced bread, the greatest thing since the 1911.

 
Posts: 19070 | Location: 18th & Fairfax  | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Let me see. I use a Redding T-7 and have been loading on it for 11 years. On this press, I have loaded north of 40,000 rounds of F-Class ammo that has allowed me to win a Texas state 1000 yard championship, several other medals and aawards at national, regional, state and local venues and so forth.

At the last outing, in very nice conditions, I was blasting away at the 1000 yards target during a match and racked up 11 X-rings shots (0.5MOA) in the 20 round string. When you get 7 of them in a row, you can be pretty confident in your ammo (and forget to check the wind flags before the 8th round goes on its errant way.)

The Redding T-7 is wonderful press; I have my dies setup, with the sizing die locked down in a Hornady lock ring, and I just go on my merry way.

My SD at the 1000 yard target, is usually between 5 and 10, more when the wind starts blowing from the front. The waterline is tight, usually about 1 MOA, but I am not the greatest shot.

The rifle, barrel, riflescope, bipod and rear rest are the best they can be. The trigger is 1 and one half ounce, yaddah, yaddah, yaddah...

My latest load development showed me a group in the threes at 100 yards for 5 rounds; I can probably reduce that a little more with some seating depth testing.

I think I've got this.


<Whimsy alert>
If I wanted to be more precise, I would have to buy select 20 cartridges, give each of them a pet name, and fiddle with them until there were absolute perfection and all precisely the same. Then I would sleep with them and care for them and only load and fire those cases, not any other. I would have a sizing die in its own Sinclair Benchrest press.

I would weigh my primers and seat them with a hydro seating tool.

I would use a Prometheus scale (no more precise than my A&D FX-120 with AT/3, but it cocst about 6 times more so it must be better even though I currently load to the kernel of Varget.) Oh wait, I understand benchresters load by volume, not weight; need to get a high end powder measure.

I would polish, sort weigh my bullet, and fuss over the meplat even more than I do now. I would then seat the bullets with a hydro press. Then I would check the concentricity of each loaded round and tear apart anything that exceeds 0.000.

Oh wait. It looks like I only need one single stage press; to do the sizing and decapping. Of course, if I really wanted to do two operations instead of one, I could use another press to decap.
</End of whimsy>

For me, as I have discussed in my stickied thread, consistency of operation is key. I have to be able to load rund after round, after round the same way and the T-7 has been wonderful for that. I love that I can keep all my dies set. The turntable mechanism of the T-7 is excellent and I love that I can flip over to a specific die for a quick operation (like checking the case or round out the mouth after dropping a prepped case (hey, I'm old), flip back and continue my operation. Also, it saves a lot of space, which is important to me.
 
Posts: 3309 | Location: Texas | Registered: June 20, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Grumblegrumble.. Now I have to go buy a T-7... Grumblegrumble...

I think I will sell the Partner to help fund the T-7 and keep the Rockchucker because it is a tank and I like it.

Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4173 | Location: AK-49 | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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After being out of stock for a good while, the press is in stock at Brownells. I had been stalking it. I definitely wasn't willing to pay the $500-$750 that people were asking for (and getting!) on FleaBay.
Ordered plus the requisite Inline Fabrication accessories.

Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4173 | Location: AK-49 | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You can also get extra turret heads if you think you'll need more than 7 stations. Plus a turret stacker, lol...plus.....
 
Posts: 5263 | Location: 7400 feet in Conifer CO | Registered: November 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Midway carries the Redding line also. All the presses are on back order. Your Rock Chucker is a good basic starter press, not a tank. A tank would be the Redding Ultra Mag. I feel that is the finest made single station available. Ive had both the Redding and Lyman turrett presses. I dont remember a evening I couldnt size and deprime 2000 pistol casings through a carbide die on my Ultra Mag. Minor usage of a RCBS lube pad included.
 
Posts: 16762 | Registered: December 23, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I must have got lucky. Both Midway and Brownells had it in stock. I may have gotten the last one as Brownells is back to backorder status. It pays to be decisive, these days (after months of waffling).

Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4173 | Location: AK-49 | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A few years ago, I purchased an Ultra Mag for a project at work for some rifle case development. The force which that press generates is impressive, it is a beast.

On a personal basis, I have had an RCBS cast iron press for over 30 years. It has served me well. About seven years ago I wanted to step up to a system for higher volume for pistol case reloading. I did quite a bit of research and narrowed down the options to a few selections for either a progressive or a turret. Hands-down, the T-7 would have been my choice for my needs at that time if my rifle case reloading was not limited to just 5.56. At the time, however, I was really focused on pistol case loading, primarily 9mm and .45 Auto. and have since added .40 S&W/10mm and 38 Super as well.

While I would have really liked to get a 650, my budget and planned needs at that time did not justify this, so I bought the Hornady L-N-L AP progressive and never looked back.

I have since added .308, 30-06, .and .444 Marlin on the rifle case side, and those will continue to be handled by the RCBS single stage. Even at that, I do use the Hornady AP for single-station decapping prior to wet media tumble, so in a way I do go back and forth between these two presses for rifle case processing.

I could see where having single-stage units for each operation for rifle cases could make sense, if you already had access to one or two single station presses, and if one’s reloading efforts are primarily focused on rifle cases. Overall, though, I would agree that the T-7 would be a very good choice. Nikon’s experience and success with the T-7 certainly drives that point home.
 
Posts: 310 | Location: Ohio | Registered: January 04, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have been loading for PRS matches on the turret press. Despite the slop in the turret connection to the base, the slop is apparently consistent (after setting and locking in your dies). While I am not looking for bench rest accuracy, I have had good results with the Lee Turret press. I have limited space on my workbench and I load 6.5 Creedmoor, .308 and .223 (75 gr for my Seeekins Precision and Remington 700 SPS tactical ). Each of these loads provide .25" groups at 100 yards in my rifles. I hope this is helpful.
 
Posts: 734 | Registered: February 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a rock chuker also, I can size and prime in 1 operation and then bell and charge with powder in 1 operation. Then seat and crimp in 1 operation. So I will do 100 or more cases then switch dies [ I use the Hornady quick change bushings ] then do the next operation etc. I guess a turret would be a little faster but not a lot I don't think, besides it aint a race. If I didn't enjoy reloading I wouldn't do it !!
 
Posts: 2 | Location: st louis | Registered: April 02, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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