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Picture of wrightd
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I'm having cataract surgery soon, what type of lens should I get ? I'm getting conflicting advice from two different doctors. My diabetes doctor said to get plain non-corrective lenses, because my eyesight will be constantly changing due to the diabetes (something I didn't know nor understand), but the eye doctor who would do the surgery recommends getting distance lenses so I could drive with clear enough vision to read highway and street signs, which is a concern I communicated to him. I said if I could drive at night with clear vision, and read street and highway signs during the daytime, I would be happy wearing any other prescription glasses for everything else, like reading, computer, shooting pistols, breaking clay, etc.

Which sounds like a better idea to you guys that have already gone through all of this? Fwiw, I don't think I'm interested in the kind of lenses where one eye is for one focal length, and the other eye is for a different focal length, and they your brain will eventually figure it out. I don't think I'm interested in anything weired like that.

Also as an aside, he said he could insert some stents to drain off eyeball pressure, as I just learned I have a mild case of glaucoma, and he could do both jobs during the same surgery. It sounded like a good idea to me, but all of this is very new so I just want to make sure I don't make any stupid choices, just in case the eye doctor isn't as good as I think he actually is.

What say you guys ?




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Of your choices I'd go with lens that give good vision for distance, and hopefully mid distance as well, then just use readers for close.


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What is your vision like now-i.e. nearsighted, farsighted, astigmatic? Do you know (can you share here) your habitual spectacle Rx?
 
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Originally posted by bcereuss:
What is your vision like now-i.e. nearsighted, farsighted, astigmatic? Do you know Chan you share here) your habitual spectacle Rx?

I don't know, but everything is blurry at all distances, reading, intermediate, and distance, I can't see anything clearly. I THINK I heard that my eyesight is 20-25, but I have no idea what that means. My understanding is that most or all of my blurriness is caused by the clouding lens, aka cataracts, and the glaucoma is messing with my side or peripheral vision. So I use different diopters of "reading" glasses for varous distances, ie reading a pill bottle, reading a book, looking at shelves of merchandise in walmart, and my prescription computer glasses (full time IT), etc. I don't mind switching glasses all the time, I just want to see clearly without all the constant bluriness and headlight starbursts during night driving.




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My wife and I both got multifocal and couldn't be happier. If I had to choose between near or distance I'd prefer corrected distance and use readers up close.
 
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I have had both type of lenses installed.
My Eye surgeon sold hard on the up-charged ($3000.) "do everything lens" Multi.I bit.
After the surgery I was VERY UN-happy with the halo I saw out of the corrected eye in any bright light. I complained and was told that I was one of the few that was too picky!
This went on for a year.
I finally had enough and made an appointment at the Cole Eye Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. They did many tests. After the tests I saw the DR.
He knew immediately what was wrong. He explained what the different lenses can do and not do so well.
The Multi lens can have a aggravating problem with halos. It also loses about 10%+ on light transmission over the regular lens.No thanks!
"Bad" possible effects were never mentioned by the original surgeon.
I asked the DR. at the Cleveland Clinic what he thought should be done.
He said that I would NEVER be happy with the multi lens. He said He could try and remove the year old implant but there could be complications. He advised that I be fully awake during the removal so he could advise me of any complications he might encounter and I could make a decision on how I wanted to proceed.The old lens came out without a problem. He installed the "normal" lens. I was happy with the choice and had the other eye done done by him with the "normal" lens a few months later.

I can't help but recommend the Cole Eye Institute and the Cleveland Clinic enough.

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Posts: 4640 | Location: Chicago, IL, USA: | Registered: November 17, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by mark60:
My wife and I both got multifocal and couldn't be happier. If I had to choose between near or distance I'd prefer corrected distance and use readers up close.


What is "corrected distance" versus regular distance lenses, for lack of my understanding. Are those terms synonymous ? And is "multifocal lenses" the same idea as progressive eyeglasses, where you move your head up and down until you find the correct head position for the distance you're trying to see ?




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I had both eyes done in the past several months.

I told the surgeon that I wanted the best distant vision I could get in my right (dominant) eye, and I ended up with 20/20 and can focus clearly from about 6 feet on.

I had “monovision” for most of my life with the natural lenses: good distant vision in right eye, nearsighted in the left. I asked to replicate that and ended up with a toric lens in my left and with that eye I can focus clearly from about 2 to 15 or so feet, and have about 20/30 vision at distance.




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Posts: 47421 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don’t know if it can be done but I have mono vision contact lenses. My master eye has a contact set up for distance. I don’t wear one in my left eye. I’m naturally near sighted. I’ve been doing this for years. Works pretty well. For really close work I wear readers. If I was to have cataract surgery I’d sure ask about it. Just a thought. Hope all goes well.
 
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So, if you’re 20/25 without correction, and you’ve been happy wearing different power cheaters for computer and reading, I’d recommend having both eyes corrected for distance only.

“Corrected” distance means wearing no correction (glasses) for distance, and readers for near-like I described above.

Nearsighted people-those that see great at near without specs but require the specs for distance-often prefer to remain nearsighted after cataract surgery.

Multifocal implants are NOT like progressive lenses; the multifocal implants are of a “simultaneous vision” design—correcting distance and near at the same time, with the resultant “compromise” to one’s vision.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Lucnik:
I don’t know if it can be done but I have mono vision contact lenses. My master eye has a contact set up for distance. I don’t wear one in my left eye. I’m naturally near sighted. I’ve been doing this for years. Works pretty well. For really close work I wear readers. If I was to have cataract surgery I’d sure ask about it. Just a thought. Hope all goes well.


It can be done.
 
Posts: 2946 | Location: (Occupied) Northern Minnesota | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Lucnik:
I don’t know if it can be done but I have mono vision contact lenses. My master eye has a contact set up for distance. I don’t wear one in my right eye. I’m naturally near sighted. I’ve been doing this for years. Works pretty well. For really close work I wear readers. If I was to have cataract surgery I’d sure ask about it. Just a thought. Hope all goes well.
 
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What is a mono vision lens, natural or otherwise, what does that mean.




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Originally posted by wrightd:
What is a mono vision lens, natural or otherwise, what does that mean.


Monovision is correcting one eye for near, one for distance. Works good IF one is motivated to avoid glasses.

Some people are naturally monovision; some with contacts; some with LASIK, some after cataract surgery.
 
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By the way, cataract surgery itself is a decent treatment for lowering one’s intraocular pressure (glaucoma). I can’t speak for the need of stents or other procedures without knowing a lot more.
 
Posts: 2946 | Location: (Occupied) Northern Minnesota | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You're from just north of me, aren't you?

I had both eyes done last summer by Gundersen Eye Clinic and I couldn't be happier with the results! They're in the LaCrosse area. Contact me and I'll give you some referrals, top-notch doctors and staff.

I had both eyes done, distance lenses, but had to get glasses to correct astigmatism in both eyes, and my vision is better now than it had been for many decades. Even brought back some depth perception that I hadn't realized was missing!


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We've just been going through this decision for my wife. Ophthalmologist recommended, and she agreed, to have the implant lens set for distance vision, and to use magnet nification for reading. In fact, she will get progressive lenses with basically plano lenses (flat glass) for the top, and reading glasses for the bottom. She prefers to wear glasses all the time rather than hunt for reading glasses when she needs them. BTW her new implant (so far left eye only) is 20/20 with no glasses (for distance).

My cataracts are slight, it will be years before I need surgery. By then I'm hoping some of the accommodative lenses--the ones that automatically adjust for distance--that are coming down the pipeline will have shown good results. Current accommodative lenses are not that good. If I had to have surgery now, I would choose to have the implant set for distance. Unlike Burgess Meredith in that famous Twilight Zone episode, I would have multiple readers and they would have shatter-proof lenses.


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Originally posted by wrightd:
quote:
Originally posted by mark60:
My wife and I both got multifocal and couldn't be happier. If I had to choose between near or distance I'd prefer corrected distance and use readers up close.


What is "corrected distance" versus regular distance lenses, for lack of my understanding. Are those terms synonymous ? And is "multifocal lenses" the same idea as progressive eyeglasses, where you move your head up and down until you find the correct head position for the distance you're trying to see ?


Typically you have a choice of coming away not needing glasses for distance but needing them for up close work, or not needing glasses up close but needing them for distance. Multifocal has concentric rings built in with different levels of correction to focus at all distances. You don't need to tip your head at all, your brain learns what part of the lens to "look" through.

I had halo's at night with headlights that we're annoyingly cool but after about 6 months I didn't notice them anymore unless I looked for them. Initially it was something new and different so I had to play with and look at them but the novelty wore off.

My wife wore glasses all her life due to a bad astigmatism and she got multifocal lenses that also corrected the astigmatism. She's completely glasses free now and loving it. She said she had a starburst at night in one eye and a halo in the other but it didn't bother her.
 
Posts: 3473 | Location: God Awful New York | Registered: July 01, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I paid for the multi-focal lens upgrade since I was pretty young (46 - cataract from a childhood injury that had gotten MUCH worse in my 40s). The doc mentioned the possibility of a halo with all the implants, but a higher possibility with the multifocal. I didn't have one initially - after about 3 months I do have one in the upper 1/6th (from about 10:00 - 12:00) in very dark conditions and looking at a bright light. I don't get it when driving, but I do when walking at night and am looking at a street light. I've found that if I open my eyes fully - they adjust and it goes away so it must be right on the edge? I've had PC glasses for about a decade already so that hasn't changed. I don't wear glasses otherwise.

The difference between presurgery and post surgery is amazing - I had heavy white clouding anytime I was looking at a bright light - headlights - my right eye was completely washed out. Driving into the sun? Same.




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Wife and I both chose simple distant vision implants with our cataract surgeries.

We use glasses for reading and desk work, not needed for driving. I am now able to pass the vision test for FAA medical certificate without glasses.



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