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Do No Harm,
Do Know Harm
posted
I promised myself if I ever came to work three days in a row saying “I hate my job”, I’d quit.

Well I’m at 5 months now.

Got promoted again in December and every single aspect of it has proven to be equivalent to being demoted. I’m not kidding or being sarcastic. Not going into detail, but one example is making significantly less money working the same or more hours now since I’m salaried. Like $2k a month less. It’s mind boggling. I won’t make that money again until two more promotions, if ever.

I’ve got 12 or so years left, NC has a 30 year retirement. The known retirement is the main thing that gives me pause.

Anyone jump to private sector? Around here it would be a bank job of some sort probably. Couple of people I know working for them describe a VASTLY different work culture and pace, much less stress and after-hours expectations, for more money.

I’ve been mad a few times in my career. Even debated getting out to go to PA school when I was moving for the kids once.

But I’ve never actually gotten to the point of looking at outside jobs before now.

Any advice?




Knowing what one is talking about is widely admired but not strictly required here.

Although sometimes distracting, there is often a certain entertainment value to this easy standard.
-JALLEN

"All I need is a WAR ON DRUGS reference and I got myself a police thread BINGO." -jljones
 
Posts: 11451 | Location: NC | Registered: August 16, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
quarter MOA visionary
Picture of smschulz
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Not LE but never work at a job you hate.
Life is too short.
I only had one job I hated (well two if you count that dishwashing job when I was 14 Frown ) and I was totally miserable.
I had enough and went to Computer School.
Sorry for the interruption but find something else. Eek
 
Posts: 22974 | Location: Houston, TX | Registered: June 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of 71 TRUCK
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First I am not in law enforcement. With that said several friends/acquaintances who after retirement went into the private sector. I guess it would depend on your experience/training/background.

One friend who retired went on to become a part time municipal manager then went to work for a utility company as a rep between them and municipal governments. He also has his masters degree.

One friend after retirement went on to become a police Chief in a small town for a while.

Several others I knew but were not good friends with either went to work for or started their own security/consulting companies. I think one of them specializes in school security

One I new years ago had his CDL and said he could make more money driving an 18 wheeler than as a police officer.

I know this might not be a lot of help however this is what some have done, however most have done it after retirement.




The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution.

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

As ratified by the States and authenticated by Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State



NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 2584 | Location: Central Florida, south of the mouse | Registered: March 08, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
Picture of RogueJSK
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quote:
Originally posted by chongosuerte:
Not going into detail, but one example is making significantly less money working the same or more hours now since I’m salaried. Like $2k a month less.


I feel that. The switch to being salaried is just one of the joys of being promoted past the first level or so... Wink


Unfortunately, I've known a bunch of guys who jumped ship to the private sector, and results are very hit or miss. The Northwest Arkansas Metroplex is the headquarters of several of the largest national and global corporations (with Walmart being the biggest example), and they all recruit heavily from local law enforcement for their departments related to risk management, security, etc.

A lot of the ones that end up going private really miss being a cop, to one extent or another. Sometimes it's just pangs; sometimes it's full-blown regret.

Some of them end up in a job that wasn't as advertised. A good example is a guy who left police work for the bigger paycheck offered in the private sector, and ended up sitting in a cubicle for 40+ hours a week with the mind-numbingly boring task of reviewing surveillance footage of pharmacists counting pills. He was miserable.

Some of them end up quite happy, with a job they love as much or more than police work, plus much higher pay and much less stress.

So it's hard to speak in generalities that "Going private is good" or "Going private is bad". It's going to depend heavily on how married you are to police work and/or being part of the police family/culture, as well as on the specific private sector employer and specific position. Every job and every person is going to make a different equation.


Being 60% of the way towards retirement already is a major consideration. If I were in your shoes, and was just fed up with police work, I'd most likely look into another city/county/state position that's on the same retirement system, so you can still retire in 12 years. Then look at private sector opportunities once you've hit 30.

Another thing to consider... Is voluntary demotion a possibility? You're unhappy in this position, but apparently were not unhappy prior to promotion. Might be something to talk to your higher-ups about.
 
Posts: 32587 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Look into working credit card and fraud / theft for any large retailer. One of my buddies quit and went to work for a big grocery chain working financial crime and employee theft. Company car, phone, great salary and hours.
I worked hospital security for a few years and it was a good gig. Some hospital operations have sworn officers.
If you have a good background in traffic crash investigation, big trucking companies are an option, too.
Insurance investigation can be a good gig. Especially arson investigation.
If you have a big Federal courthouse nearby or VA facility, check into them.
Some of my buddies lateral transferred into the Fire Dept and loved it. I think the only thing I would avoid would be college campus police.


End of Earth: 2 Miles
Upper Peninsula: 4 Miles
 
Posts: 16158 | Location: Marquette MI | Registered: July 08, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
Picture of RogueJSK
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quote:
Originally posted by YooperSigs:
If you have a big Federal courthouse nearby or VA facility, check into them.


I've read and heard nothing but absolutely terrible things about working as the Veterans Affairs Police, including: Zero LE authority off duty. Minimal LE authority on duty. Not considered LE by the federal government for purposes of benefits or retirement. Zero recognition of outside police academy training (so you have to go through the full VA academy again), and in return the VA academy isn't recognized by anyone else, either state or other federal agencies. Shitty pay. Bad equipment and training. Hands tied by ridiculous policing policies set by hospital administrators rather than police administrators. Awful workplace culture. Constant turnover. Terrible morale nationwide. Etc. Etc.

I briefly considered it back when I was in an unhappy work situation and a supervisory position opened up at the local VA, but what I learned quickly caused me to abandon that idea, and luckily the work situation resolved itself shortly afterwards.

Federal courthouse security seems like a great gig, though.
 
Posts: 32587 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Shit don't
mean shit
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
I'd most likely look into another city/county/state position that's on the same retirement system, so you can still retire in 12 years.


Not in LE myself, but this was my thought as well. What is it you don't like? I grew up in an affluent suburban area, and now live in a rural area about 30 miles outside of Denver. Depending on what it is you don't like, can you look for a smaller/more rural area? Of course if you don't like the slowness of a rural area then that might not be the answer either. If you don't move you may have a longer (reverse) commute, but it may be worth it.
 
Posts: 5769 | Location: 7400 feet in Conifer CO | Registered: November 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Perception
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You were happy in your previous position, and I assume well liked. Do you have the kind of relationship with your superiors that you could have a frank conversation with them and let them know that it isn't what you were hoping for and that you would like to go back? They might be receptive to making something happen if they know you're miserable enough that they might lose you completely.




"The people hate the lizards and the lizards rule the people."
"Odd," said Arthur, "I thought you said it was a democracy."
"I did," said Ford, "it is."
"So," said Arthur, hoping he wasn't sounding ridiculously obtuse, "why don't the people get rid of the lizards?"
"It honestly doesn't occur to them. They've all got the vote, so they all pretty much assume that the government they've voted in more or less approximates the government they want."
"You mean they actually vote for the lizards."
"Oh yes," said Ford with a shrug, "of course."
"But," said Arthur, going for the big one again, "why?"
"Because if they didn't vote for a lizard, then the wrong lizard might get in."
 
Posts: 3523 | Location: Two blocks from the Center of the Universe | Registered: December 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I can't tell if I'm
tired, or just lazy
Picture of ggile
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When I retired from law enforcement I went to work in corporate security and then casino security. Best jobs I ever had!

Wish I'd done it sooner.


_____________________________

"The problems we face today exist because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living."

"Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety"
Benjamin Franklin
 
Posts: 2096 | Location: South Dakota-pheasant country | Registered: June 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Optimistic Cynic
Picture of architect
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quote:
Originally posted by smschulz:
Not LE but never work at a job you hate.
Life is too short.
I only had one job I hated (well two if you count that dishwashing job when I was 14 Frown ) and I was totally miserable.
I had enough and went to Computer School.
Sorry for the interruption but find something else. Eek
This is incredibly sound advice. Here's how I figure it: you spend more time each day/week/year working than any other specific activity. Therefore, it doesn't make sense to not put a fulfilling work experience at the top of your priority list. You're going to get a lot more happiness mileage out of a good job than any hobby. You should already know what aspects of policing you enjoy the most, find a way to maximize your exposure to those experiences. Don't be too focused on the financial aspects, a career change usually comes with a step down in income. However, liking what you do is the surest way to become successful in a new endeavor, and increased opportunities will follow.
 
Posts: 6536 | Location: NoVA | Registered: July 22, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Do No Harm,
Do Know Harm
posted Hide Post
To be crystal clear—if I leave it will not be for another law enforcement gig. That ship has sailed. The job is not what it was when I started, and I was fortunate to do lots of fun shit when I was actually a cop. I am in middle management here and I’m not jumping into another agency at any level. I’d rather not do anything government related. I could still teach classes on the side as I desired, which would probably be my only wish.

And it is absolutely about the money. I know what my work ethic is and I know what my work product is worth. The current disparity situation is actually worse thank I’m going to explain in that category and again…is mind boggling. Thankfully we live below our means and are fine financially, but it’s the principle of more work/expectations for less money and more demands that has led me to this point. If I can make the same money or more with significantly less stress…

Going back to my old position is not a realistic option. If I were to get a voluntary demotion I’m sure they put me on third shift somewhere as retribution. However that’s not an option I’m taking off the table yet.




Knowing what one is talking about is widely admired but not strictly required here.

Although sometimes distracting, there is often a certain entertainment value to this easy standard.
-JALLEN

"All I need is a WAR ON DRUGS reference and I got myself a police thread BINGO." -jljones
 
Posts: 11451 | Location: NC | Registered: August 16, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of 71 TRUCK
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Do you have any kind of special training or certifications that would transfer to the private sector?
Do you have a collage degree or at least some collage credits?
Are you willing to, or do you have the time to go back to school, any kind of school, to add to your background?




The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution.

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

As ratified by the States and authenticated by Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State



NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 2584 | Location: Central Florida, south of the mouse | Registered: March 08, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Do No Harm,
Do Know Harm
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by 71 TRUCK:
Do you have any kind of special training or certifications that would transfer to the private sector?
Do you have a collage degree or at least some collage credits?
Are you willing to, or do you have the time to go back to school, any kind of school, to add to your background?


I’ve got several options…not looking for a job so much as looking for experiences doing the change.

I grew up on a tobacco farm and worked hard, but I have worked for the government since I was 20 as a paramedic and a cop. I’m almost 40. The whole concept of the private sector is completely foreign to me.




Knowing what one is talking about is widely admired but not strictly required here.

Although sometimes distracting, there is often a certain entertainment value to this easy standard.
-JALLEN

"All I need is a WAR ON DRUGS reference and I got myself a police thread BINGO." -jljones
 
Posts: 11451 | Location: NC | Registered: August 16, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Banned for
showing his ass
posted Hide Post
Though not switching mid-career ... retiring after 38 years as an LEO I got talked into working part time by the "field working" manager of our small water district (900 customers) from reading meters, installing new water service and repairing broken water mains (even night time callouts). I loved the work ! Did this for two years before the pandemic took the work away from myself and another retiree. After the pandemic asked to come back but was too busy with "wife projects" to return.
 
Posts: 3190 | Location: PNW | Registered: November 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You might check into NICB. The agents we worked with when I was in Auto Theft were prior LEO's,
https://www.nicb.org/.
 
Posts: 3604 | Location: Texas Hill Country | Registered: July 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of 71 TRUCK
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by chongosuerte:
quote:
Originally posted by 71 TRUCK:
Do you have any kind of special training or certifications that would transfer to the private sector?
Do you have a collage degree or at least some collage credits?
Are you willing to, or do you have the time to go back to school, any kind of school, to add to your background?


I’ve got several options…not looking for a job so much as looking for experiences doing the change.

I grew up on a tobacco farm and worked hard, but I have worked for the government since I was 20 as a paramedic and a cop. I’m almost 40. The whole concept of the private sector is completely foreign to me.


Check your Email.
It's a little long but it's what I did. Not saying you have to go this rout it's just what my wife and I did.




The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution.

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

As ratified by the States and authenticated by Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State



NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 2584 | Location: Central Florida, south of the mouse | Registered: March 08, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One of my my best friends had 22yrs at AZDPS. Left and went to the major airport as LEO. Counts towards retirement years. He says it was the best decision he could have made


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Live today as if it may be your last and learn today as if you will live forever
 
Posts: 6243 | Location: New Orleans...outside the levees, fishing in the Rigolets | Registered: October 11, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have two ex LEO friends that got into the private sector providing security for high level executives. They both did that for several years and made so many great connections that they are now managers in different unrelated companies making bank.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: 1s1k,
 
Posts: 3937 | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Lawyers, Guns
and Money
Picture of chellim1
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quote:
I have worked for the government since I was 20 as a paramedic and a cop. I’m almost 40. The whole concept of the private sector is completely foreign to me.
...
And it is absolutely about the money. I know what my work ethic is and I know what my work product is worth. The current disparity situation is actually worse thank I’m going to explain in that category and again…is mind boggling.

OK...
Ask yourself if these two statements are in alignment. I'm not telling you you are wrong, just asking. If you know what you are worth... and it's offered in another field, it's a no-brainer. Go for it. But it sounds like you're not really sure.



"Some things are apparent. Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates and our ability to control our own destiny atrophies. The result is: families under siege; war in the streets; unapologetic expropriation of property; the precipitous decline of the rule of law; the rapid rise of corruption; the loss of civility and the triumph of deceit. The result is a debased, debauched culture which finds moral depravity entertaining and virtue contemptible."
-- Justice Janice Rogers Brown

"The United States government is the largest criminal enterprise on earth."
-rduckwor
 
Posts: 24192 | Location: St. Louis, MO | Registered: April 03, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Smarter than the
average bear
posted Hide Post
I just wanted to point out that there are other fields where a promotion means less money, due to a loss of commission or overtime. The obvious idea is that it eventually leads to better working conditions and better pay as well.

If you’re 40, 12 years will pass quickly. The question is can you get to the other side of that work/pay scale in a reasonable time. You said two more promotions, if ever, but would those likely come in a few years, or more like ten?

A few years can be an eternity if you’re miserable with the work. But if it’s the money that’s soured your attitude, it could well be worth it to get to the other side. Part of a longer plan.

Lastly, as I near 63, a full retirement at 52 is not something to take lightly (I know you’re not). And consider how the experience of those last years/ positions might greatly increase your value in a post retirement career.
 
Posts: 3446 | Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana | Registered: June 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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