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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by YooperSigs:
If you have a big Federal courthouse nearby or VA facility, check into them.


I've read and heard nothing but absolutely terrible things about working as the Veterans Affairs Police, including: Zero LE authority off duty. Minimal LE authority on duty. Not considered LE by the federal government for purposes of benefits or retirement. Zero recognition of outside police academy training (so you have to go through the full VA academy again), and in return the VA academy isn't recognized by anyone else, either state or other federal agencies. Shitty pay. Bad equipment and training. Hands tied by ridiculous policing policies set by hospital administrators rather than police administrators. Awful workplace culture. Constant turnover. Terrible morale nationwide. Etc. Etc.

I briefly considered it back when I was in an unhappy work situation and a supervisory position opened up at the local VA, but what I learned quickly caused me to abandon that idea, and luckily the work situation resolved itself shortly afterwards.

Federal courthouse security seems like a great gig, though.


One of newer officers did the VA cop thing. Had to go to our state academy for the whole thing because they would take the VA academy stuff. He said the best part of it was the 12 hr. Rotating shifts so you would have every other weekend off. That was about it.

I do DSO for the Marshals as a side gig. It is a good gig. Good money for babysitting prisoners in court. Maybe transporting to and from local county jails to fed court. Just got an unannounced pay raise because, like anyone else, they can’t find people to work. Money is stupid good. But, being that I am still in the job fulltime I don’t get many hours. For example I worked yesterday for them for a trial. 8.5 hours in court in a suit. First hours I had in 3 months. So it is hit and miss. The two retired guys get a majority of the hours.

Now the CSO are the guys who wear the ugly blue blazers and grey pants w/ external vests and duty belts under their blazer. That would suck. They get ok money (not DSO money) and they can get some benefits if they are fulltime. But, they rotate posts IE… watch the doors and metal detectors, walk around and all over the inside of the courthouse, rotate to the security cameras for a while, etc… they work for a different private company that contracts w/ the Marshals.
 
Posts: 4086 | Registered: January 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I am not
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I have 26 years in corrections. 4 to go. Its a tough path to do anything for 30 years but especially LE. I have had times when I have enjoyed it and times I have "hated" it. 5 months seems like a short amount of time to decide to pull the plug. My motto was always if you are going through hell keep going!! You have any supervisors that are good? IE have your back (mentor). chances are they could give you some feedback that might be beneficial.

I know Police Officer's that quit and started a private security company and they are doing quite well for themselves. So things could work out either way.
 
Posts: 7827 | Location: Bismarck ND | Registered: February 19, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of HayesGreener
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I retired from two dfferent agencies after 42 years in LE. There were some rough patches along the way but I stuck with it and was fortunate to retire on a high note. I started a PI and fiearms training firm with my son and did that for 8 years then turned the business over to my son. It is cold out here in the private sector. Starting your own business you need a good business plan and a market demand for your services. Working for a private company, the company needs a good business plan and market. COVID killed my firearms training business and nearly killed our PI business.

I trained security officers and PI's for their firearm licenses for 8 years. Starting pay in security companies usually sucks but the companies want experienced LEO's, who usually move up to supervisory or management jobs pretty quickly. Linkedin might give leads on good jobs.

I have friends who left public LE to work as investigators for personal injuury law fims and had VERY lucrative compensation packages. Not everyone's cup of tea but can be a good option with a first rate law firm.

With all that said, is your pension portable in your state? Have you considered moving to another agency?

I really understand where you are coming from.
Many officers fnd themselves where you are midpoint in their careers. You need a path that best fits the needs of you and your family. Best of luck in your quest.


CMSGT USAF (Retired)
Chief of Police (Retired)
 
Posts: 4360 | Location: Florida Panhandle | Registered: September 27, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Semper Fidelis Marines
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by 357fuzz:
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by YooperSigs:
If you have a big Federal courthouse nearby or VA facility, check into them.


I've read and heard nothing but absolutely terrible things about working as the Veterans Affairs Police, including: Zero LE authority off duty. Minimal LE authority on duty. Not considered LE by the federal government for purposes of benefits or retirement. Zero recognition of outside police academy training (so you have to go through the full VA academy again), and in return the VA academy isn't recognized by anyone else, either state or other federal agencies. Shitty pay. Bad equipment and training. Hands tied by ridiculous policing policies set by hospital administrators rather than police administrators. Awful workplace culture. Constant turnover. Terrible morale nationwide. Etc. Etc.

I briefly considered it back when I was in an unhappy work situation and a supervisory position opened up at the local VA, but what I learned quickly caused me to abandon that idea, and luckily the work situation resolved itself shortly afterwards.

Federal courthouse security seems like a great gig, though.


One of newer officers did the VA cop thing. Had to go to our state academy for the whole thing because they would take the VA academy stuff. He said the best part of it was the 12 hr. Rotating shifts so you would have every other weekend off. That was about it.

I do DSO for the Marshals as a side gig. It is a good gig. Good money for babysitting prisoners in court. Maybe transporting to and from local county jails to fed court. Just got an unannounced pay raise because, like anyone else, they can’t find people to work. Money is stupid good. But, being that I am still in the job fulltime I don’t get many hours. For example I worked yesterday for them for a trial. 8.5 hours in court in a suit. First hours I had in 3 months. So it is hit and miss. The two retired guys get a majority of the hours.

Now the CSO are the guys who wear the ugly blue blazers and grey pants w/ external vests and duty belts under their blazer. That would suck. They get ok money (not DSO money) and they can get some benefits if they are fulltime. But, they rotate posts IE… watch the doors and metal detectors, walk around and all over the inside of the courthouse, rotate to the security cameras for a while, etc… they work for a different private company that contracts w/ the Marshals.




I was a credentialed TFO for quite a while. is this DSO a LEO job?? I am interested in this , my Federal Courthouse is close but have not been running and gunning with them for a few years.


thanks, shawn
Semper Fi,
---->>> EXCUSE TYPOS<<<---
 
Posts: 3340 | Location: TEXAS! | Registered: February 15, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Semper Fidelis Marines
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24 years here, 22 as a road LEO and the last two as an Elected Constable (LEO) .
You may want to look into FPS, federal protective services. they function as uniform LEOs in MOST fed buildings. I took a side job as a contract armed guard at a social security office years ago, paid VERY well and very easy.


thanks, shawn
Semper Fi,
---->>> EXCUSE TYPOS<<<---
 
Posts: 3340 | Location: TEXAS! | Registered: February 15, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by golddot:
quote:
Originally posted by 357fuzz:
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by YooperSigs:
If you have a big Federal courthouse nearby or VA facility, check into them.


I've read and heard nothing but absolutely terrible things about working as the Veterans Affairs Police, including: Zero LE authority off duty. Minimal LE authority on duty. Not considered LE by the federal government for purposes of benefits or retirement. Zero recognition of outside police academy training (so you have to go through the full VA academy again), and in return the VA academy isn't recognized by anyone else, either state or other federal agencies. Shitty pay. Bad equipment and training. Hands tied by ridiculous policing policies set by hospital administrators rather than police administrators. Awful workplace culture. Constant turnover. Terrible morale nationwide. Etc. Etc.

I briefly considered it back when I was in an unhappy work situation and a supervisory position opened up at the local VA, but what I learned quickly caused me to abandon that idea, and luckily the work situation resolved itself shortly afterwards.

Federal courthouse security seems like a great gig, though.


One of newer officers did the VA cop thing. Had to go to our state academy for the whole thing because they would take the VA academy stuff. He said the best part of it was the 12 hr. Rotating shifts so you would have every other weekend off. That was about it.

I do DSO for the Marshals as a side gig. It is a good gig. Good money for babysitting prisoners in court. Maybe transporting to and from local county jails to fed court. Just got an unannounced pay raise because, like anyone else, they can’t find people to work. Money is stupid good. But, being that I am still in the job fulltime I don’t get many hours. For example I worked yesterday for them for a trial. 8.5 hours in court in a suit. First hours I had in 3 months. So it is hit and miss. The two retired guys get a majority of the hours.

Now the CSO are the guys who wear the ugly blue blazers and grey pants w/ external vests and duty belts under their blazer. That would suck. They get ok money (not DSO money) and they can get some benefits if they are fulltime. But, they rotate posts IE… watch the doors and metal detectors, walk around and all over the inside of the courthouse, rotate to the security cameras for a while, etc… they work for a different private company that contracts w/ the Marshals.




I was a credentialed TFO for quite a while. is this DSO a LEO job?? I am interested in this , my Federal Courthouse is close but have not been running and gunning with them for a few years.


Sort of. They only take active cops and retired cops IIRC. Qualify on your own pistol once a year. Have some mandatory cheese in service training. I don’t think you have arrest powers for the Marshals but, your own agency powers or your retired rights to do stuff. You are always w/ a Deputy Marshal. Basically an extra pair of hands in prisoner transports and court appearances for said prisoners. Find a Deluty Marshal and ask. They are always looking. Easy gig. Good money.
 
Posts: 4086 | Registered: January 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Semper Fidelis Marines
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by 357fuzz:
quote:
Originally posted by golddot:
quote:
Originally posted by 357fuzz:
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by YooperSigs:
If you have a big Federal courthouse nearby or VA facility, check into them.


I've read and heard nothing but absolutely terrible things about working as the Veterans Affairs Police, including: Zero LE authority off duty. Minimal LE authority on duty. Not considered LE by the federal government for purposes of benefits or retirement. Zero recognition of outside police academy training (so you have to go through the full VA academy again), and in return the VA academy isn't recognized by anyone else, either state or other federal agencies. Shitty pay. Bad equipment and training. Hands tied by ridiculous policing policies set by hospital administrators rather than police administrators. Awful workplace culture. Constant turnover. Terrible morale nationwide. Etc. Etc.

I briefly considered it back when I was in an unhappy work situation and a supervisory position opened up at the local VA, but what I learned quickly caused me to abandon that idea, and luckily the work situation resolved itself shortly afterwards.

Federal courthouse security seems like a great gig, though.


One of newer officers did the VA cop thing. Had to go to our state academy for the whole thing because they would take the VA academy stuff. He said the best part of it was the 12 hr. Rotating shifts so you would have every other weekend off. That was about it.

I do DSO for the Marshals as a side gig. It is a good gig. Good money for babysitting prisoners in court. Maybe transporting to and from local county jails to fed court. Just got an unannounced pay raise because, like anyone else, they can’t find people to work. Money is stupid good. But, being that I am still in the job fulltime I don’t get many hours. For example I worked yesterday for them for a trial. 8.5 hours in court in a suit. First hours I had in 3 months. So it is hit and miss. The two retired guys get a majority of the hours.

Now the CSO are the guys who wear the ugly blue blazers and grey pants w/ external vests and duty belts under their blazer. That would suck. They get ok money (not DSO money) and they can get some benefits if they are fulltime. But, they rotate posts IE… watch the doors and metal detectors, walk around and all over the inside of the courthouse, rotate to the security cameras for a while, etc… they work for a different private company that contracts w/ the Marshals.




I was a credentialed TFO for quite a while. is this DSO a LEO job?? I am interested in this , my Federal Courthouse is close but have not been running and gunning with them for a few years.


Sort of. They only take active cops and retired cops IIRC. Qualify on your own pistol once a year. Have some mandatory cheese in service training. I don’t think you have arrest powers for the Marshals but, your own agency powers or your retired rights to do stuff. You are always w/ a Deputy Marshal. Basically an extra pair of hands in prisoner transports and court appearances for said prisoners. Find a Deluty Marshal and ask. They are always looking. Easy gig. Good money.



thank ya sir !


thanks, shawn
Semper Fi,
---->>> EXCUSE TYPOS<<<---
 
Posts: 3340 | Location: TEXAS! | Registered: February 15, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pursuing the wicked
Picture of rangemaster
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Can you go back to your old rank? Voluntary demotion?

If you’re 18 in with 12 to go I’d not give up.

I feel the same way you do, entirely because my chief is a (insert your favorite derogatory expletive) but I’ve got 38 months and he has 14 so I am planning to outlast him.
 
Posts: 1624 | Location: West Virginia | Registered: December 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Our LT. left for a security job at a big hospital. More pay and less stress. He loves it.
Don't work at a job you are not happy in. It will make you miserable, damage relationships and your health.
 
Posts: 438 | Location: Kansas | Registered: August 28, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of mikeyspizza
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Not an LEO but a retired Fed. Was not always happy but stuck it out to get that pension. Moved around as needed to stay sane - not always for more $. I personally would not jump ship and lose 18 years of service - that's too big of an investment and seniority you can't get back unless you work till 60 70 or whatever. Early on as a youngster with 4-5 years of service I considered private sector but per the advice of those who interviewed me I stayed with the govt - it worked out ok. Per your tagline, I don't really know what I'm talking about, but I would look for something within the overall system that my 18 years of service would transfer to, even if not LEO, but with a salary I could make do on, and maybe with advancement potential, etc. Again, I would want to salvage those 18 years somehow. Those pension checks are mighty nice. If there was some great offer or opportunity that exceeded the value of the pension, then that's another story.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: mikeyspizza,
 
Posts: 4029 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: August 16, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I retired at 55 with a decent pension and taught accident investigation around the state part time. Loved teaching cops, the university not so much. But, that led to me starting a consulting business working for attorneys and insurance companies. I got paid well to inspect vehicles, go to crash scenes (sometimes years after the crash) and read piles of reports and depositions looking for the smoking gun. Most lawyers are happy to pay for hours of reading so they don't have to do it themselves.

Good part: got paid a retainer up front and charged from the time my garage door went up until the time it went down. I was able to have the company furnish health insurance for the "employees" - me and my wife. I didn't ever advertise - attorneys share names of experts with each other. I refused to work for ambulance chasers: I told a client "I find what I find and you have to live with it". If someone balked at that, I got back in my truck and left.

Bad part: while the money is good, it's not steady work. I could go without anything for months and then get two or three cases in a week. I got deposed many times where I wanted to go home and take a shower to wash off the slime afterward. Attorneys are great procrastinators. I would get calls "Can you look at a truck 400 miles from you?" When? "Tomorrow." Those guys paid big bucks for waiting until the 59th day.

Long way to get to the point: you have skills. Figure out who needs them and go for it.
 
Posts: 703 | Location: Rural W. MI | Registered: February 25, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Villebilly Deluxe
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I retired after 25 years. I was 46. I got bored quickly and ended up back in LE. My pension allows me to do what I want instead of what I have to. I’ve known a few guys who got out and went into the private sector. All but one are back in LE. They couldn’t adjust to the private sector for whatever reason.
 
Posts: 397 | Location: Bluegrass State | Registered: February 09, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Cupcake
Picture of Chipster
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I got out after 25.5 years. It’s a full retirement (we’re fully vested at 20) but I can’t draw until I’m 52 (3 years out). Nevertheless I’ve never been happier. I bought a small retail store and sell work boots and shoes across the street from where my wife works (county government). I lost a lot financially but it really doesn’t matter. Hopefully the years I add to my life will make it worthwhile but even if it doesn’t, the happiness now does.

The culture in my department will never get better and the quality of officers has plummeted. I honestly didn’t care for but a couple and you know well enough that the politicians and society in general isn’t getting any better. Make the jump. I think you’ll end up better than you think. I know I did.


Chip
 
Posts: 557 | Location: IN | Registered: March 09, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
Picture of RogueJSK
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quote:
Originally posted by Chipster:
I got out after 25.5 years. It’s a full retirement (we’re fully vested at 20) but I can’t draw until I’m 52 (3 years out).


I could get out in just 8 years after 25 in, through our "early retirement" mechanism, but it'd be painful.

Our full retirement at 28 years gets you an immediate pension equal to 80% of your average take home pay between your 3 best years.

You can retire early as soon as 25 years, and still start drawing a pension right away, but that pension percentage is reduced by 1% for every month before 28 years. So at 25 years, that's 36 months early, thus it drops your pension down to 44% (80-36) of your average top pay. Nearly half of the full pension (44% vs. 80%).

Thus, it's a pretty terrible option, unless you're just that desperate to be done at 25 and can't stick it out for just 3 more years.
 
Posts: 32719 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Chongo, I've got a few friends that retired or just left and went and got real jobs. Most (99%) are happy they did.
Painter, regional management, owner of a hotel, various security positions...

One of the best things I heard from one of the retirees was "It's just a job. It's only a lifestyle if you want it to be." When he was working, he was a phenomenal cop, not just some 9-5er.


______________________________________________________________________
"When its time to shoot, shoot. Dont talk!"

“What the government is good at is collecting taxes, taking away your freedoms and killing people. It’s not good at much else.” —Author Tom Clancy
 
Posts: 8419 | Location: Attempting to keep the noise down around Midway Airport | Registered: February 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Green grass and
high tides
Picture of old rugged cross
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by Chipster:
I got out after 25.5 years. It’s a full retirement (we’re fully vested at 20) but I can’t draw until I’m 52 (3 years out).


I could get out in just 8 years after 25 in, through our "early retirement" mechanism, but it'd be painful.

Our full retirement at 28 years gets you an immediate pension equal to 80% of your average take home pay between your 3 best years.

You can retire early as soon as 25 years, and still start drawing a pension right away, but that pension percentage is reduced by 1% for every month before 28 years. So at 25 years, that's 36 months early, thus it drops your pension down to 44% (80-36) of your average top pay. Nearly half of the full pension (44% vs. 80%).

Thus, it's a pretty terrible option, unless you're just that desperate to be done at 25 and can't stick it out for just 3 more years.


That sounds like a sham. I would be looking for a new employer.

It does not sound like that is a norm according to what others have posted.



"Practice like you want to play in the game"
 
Posts: 19463 | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Seeker
Picture of StorminNormin
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Chongo, not sure if you are on LinkedIn but there is a group called “Cop to Corporate” that may be worth looking at. At the least you will see places people went to work and then can look for job openings in your area and decide if they interest you. For me I worked in the private sector doing investigations for about 20 years before moving to the public sector so I did it in reverse.




NRA Benefactor Life Member
 
Posts: 8705 | Location: The Lone Star State | Registered: July 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
Picture of RogueJSK
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by old rugged cross:
That sounds like a sham. I would be looking for a new employer.

It does not sound like that is a norm according to what others have posted.


Well, that's the norm around here. It's not something exclusive to just my agency. That's the way it works in the Arkansas state government retirement system. So the same applies to all state government employees regardless of agency, plus public school teachers, and city/county government employees whose city/county elects to participate in the state retirement system (of which most do).

There's other good stuff to offset the comparatively long years of service requirement, including that the pension percentage is higher than average nationwide, and there's a guaranteed 3% annual cost of living increase for your pension. Plus there's not a minimum age before you can start drawing a pension, like some of the earlier posters have mentioned.

And importantly, unlike a lot of states, the Arkansas state pension fund is extremely healthy, and very well-managed.

Hell, just having access to a pension itself is not the norm these days, let alone one that's high enough to live off of. Most employers have moved away from pensions altogether, replacing them with 401Ks and personal retirement savings.

In addition, while 28 years is a bit of a haul, I started when I was 21 years old. So I'll be retired at 49, with a pension for the rest of my life of 80% of my top salary, +3% every year. That seems like a pretty damn good deal to me, compared to most retirement plans these days. This means that any other supplemental retirement savings I have (or Social Security, if that's even a thing by the time I'm eligible) are just gravy, since I'll be able to afford to live off just my pension alone. Plus, I'll be young enough to still work other jobs, if I want to.

So, all things considered, I think I'm better off than in many other retirement systems.
 
Posts: 32719 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Prepared for the Worst, Providing the Best
Picture of 92fstech
posted Hide Post
quote:
In addition, while 28 years is a bit of a haul, I started when I was 21 years old. So I'll be retired at 49, with a pension for the rest of my life of 80% of my top salary, +3% every year.


That is indeed a darn good deal! My buddy retired at 36 years of service last year, as a LT. He was maxed out on his pension and he's only getting 75% of a base patrolman salary...if he'd retired at 20, it would only be 50%.
 
Posts: 8932 | Location: In the Cornfields | Registered: May 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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