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I Am The Walrus
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quote:
Originally posted by trapper189:
Wanna guess where Nissan engineers put the starter on the 5.6L V8 in our Armada? Gold star if you guessed under the intake manifold.


Is it also angled downwards to ensure it will leak all oil out?

Sometimes I think the engineers do it as a sick joke.


_____________

 
Posts: 12066 | Registered: March 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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First time I put the hood up on a Subaru I was impressed to find the oil filter mounted right there in its own little spillage cup. Now, I haven’t changed my own oil since my 20’s but that seemed like a pretty good idea to me.
 
Posts: 5135 | Registered: June 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
אַרְיֵה
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The oil filter location in my 1978 MB 240D was great. A canister mounted to the firewall with plenty of clearance, easy access.

Just remove two bolts holding the canister lid, lift the lid, and take the filter element out with one hand while holding a small drip pan with the other hand.

You could change the filter while wearing a white dress shirt and not get a drop on you.

Only problem was remembering where you the 10mm socket last time you used it. Wink



Any cocktail can be a shrimp cocktail if you put your mind to it, and if you carry lots of loose shrimp in your pocket.

הרחפת שלי מלאה בצלופחים
 
Posts: 27186 | Location: Central Florida, Orlando area | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
quarter MOA visionary
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quote:
Originally posted by trapper189:
Wanna guess where Nissan engineers put the starter on the 5.6L V8 in our Armada? Gold star if you guessed under the intake manifold.


Same engine as Titan and Infinity's too.
Unbelievably inconvenient - I won't say stupid because it is a calculated design but when or if it goes it will cost big bucks. Frown
 
Posts: 20483 | Location: Houston, TX | Registered: June 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by smschulz:
quote:
Originally posted by trapper189:
Wanna guess where Nissan engineers put the starter on the 5.6L V8 in our Armada? Gold star if you guessed under the intake manifold.


Same engine as Titan and Infinity's too.
Unbelievably inconvenient - I won't say stupid because it is a calculated design but when or if it goes it will cost big bucks. Frown


Toyota does it too. At least on the Tundra
 
Posts: 510 | Location: Southeast Tennessee | Registered: September 30, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I once owned a Nissan Xterra. On a hot July day on a dirt road in the backcountry of Wyoming, I had a flat tire. My friend and I, both in our mid 70s, unloaded all the camping and fishing gear, located the jack, pulled the spare, and tried to change the tire. The OEM jack would not lift the vehicle high enough to remove the tire.

Fortunately, I had some 2x6 blocks. Using them, we changed the tire.

Back home, I took the vehicle to the dealer and complained. The helpful service techs said, "Sir, you must have been doing something wrong." Always a possibility for operator error, please show me how to do it.

Of course, they couldn't. Nissan has known about this issue for years and made no attempt to solve the problem.

I now own a vehicle from a different maker.
 
Posts: 538 | Location: Wyoming | Registered: February 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would welcome the challenge to be able to change the oil in my vehicles, but due to HOA restrictions I will get written up for working on my vehicles in the driveway.

So I just take it into the garage.
 
Posts: 437 | Location: Florida | Registered: November 16, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Tn226:
I too suffer the Frontier oil filter woes.

Best I’ve come up with

Go in/out via the passenger side wheel well

Use a large ziplock bag around the filter.

I use a small piece of bent aluminum flashing under the less than adequate drip thingy to direct the spillage out the hole in the plate

All the above actually works pretty well to minimize, not eliminate, the mess.
My dad taught me to save bread bags for that very reason. You can slide them over the filter since they are plenty long and slim. Works great for hard to reach filters or filters that are on an angle and leak like a mofo while you get them off.
 
Posts: 3087 | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His diet consists of black
coffee, and sarcasm.
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Ford trucks with the 3.7 have a plastic drain plug, in the plastic oil pan, the opening about an inch in diameter. The oil comes out with such speed and force that it splashes off the drain pan and goes into the suspension on the other side, leaving a huge mess to clean up. If anything ever needed a Fumoto valve, this is it. Well, that or a better designed drain. Roll Eyes
 
Posts: 25687 | Location: Johnson City/Elizabethton, TN | Registered: April 28, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is there no filter relocation kit available?


_________________________
You do NOT have the right to never be offended.
 
Posts: 2927 | Location: Round Rock | Registered: February 11, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like where it is located on my 1991 Corvette ZR1, with the Lotus engine built by Mercruiser.

 
Posts: 113 | Location: United States | Registered: January 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Drool, C4 ZR1




The Enemy's gate is down.
 
Posts: 11048 | Location: Spring, TX | Registered: July 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:
The oil filter location in my 1978 MB 240D was great. A canister mounted to the firewall with plenty of clearance, easy access.

Just remove two bolts holding the canister lid, lift the lid, and take the filter element out with one hand while holding a small drip pan with the other hand.

You could change the filter while wearing a white dress shirt and not get a drop on you.

Only problem was remembering where you the 10mm socket last time you used it. Wink


You're lucky. Mrs. Flash had a 1974 MB 240D which required you to have arms as long as an orangutan and be a contortionist simultaneously.

I finally gave up and had it done by MB mechanics.
 
Posts: 9063 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
אַרְיֵה
Picture of V-Tail
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Flash-LB:
quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:

The oil filter location in my 1978 MB 240D was great. A canister mounted to the firewall with plenty of clearance, easy access.

Just remove two bolts holding the canister lid, lift the lid, and take the filter element out with one hand while holding a small drip pan with the other hand.

You could change the filter while wearing a white dress shirt and not get a drop on you.

Only problem was remembering where you the 10mm socket last time you used it. Wink
You're lucky. Mrs. Flash had a 1974 MB 240D which required you to have arms as long as an orangutan and be a contortionist simultaneously.

I finally gave up and had it done by MB mechanics.
I believe that the filter location I referred to, started with the W123 series, which debuted with the 1976 models.



Any cocktail can be a shrimp cocktail if you put your mind to it, and if you carry lots of loose shrimp in your pocket.

הרחפת שלי מלאה בצלופחים
 
Posts: 27186 | Location: Central Florida, Orlando area | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
"Member"
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quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
Sounds like Nissan needs to recruit some Subaru engineers! Big Grin


Oh heck, I changed the starter on my old Impreza faster than it takes me to just get the protective plate off to get to the oil filter on my Xterra.
 
Posts: 19645 | Location: 18th & Fairfax  | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:
quote:
Originally posted by Flash-LB:
quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:

The oil filter location in my 1978 MB 240D was great. A canister mounted to the firewall with plenty of clearance, easy access.

Just remove two bolts holding the canister lid, lift the lid, and take the filter element out with one hand while holding a small drip pan with the other hand.

You could change the filter while wearing a white dress shirt and not get a drop on you.

Only problem was remembering where you the 10mm socket last time you used it. Wink
You're lucky. Mrs. Flash had a 1974 MB 240D which required you to have arms as long as an orangutan and be a contortionist simultaneously.

I finally gave up and had it done by MB mechanics.
I believe that the filter location I referred to, started with the W123 series, which debuted with the 1976 models.


Yeah, I wish Mrs. Flash's MB had it.
 
Posts: 9063 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of P250UA5
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:
quote:
Originally posted by Flash-LB:
quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:
The oil filter location in my 1978 MB 240D was great.

You're lucky. Mrs. Flash had a 1974 MB 240D

I believe that the filter location I referred to, started with the W123 series, which debuted with the 1976 models.


Still miss my W123 '82 240D, over 300k on it when we bought it in 2002.
Slowest car I've ever driven, but a great car, apart from losing reverse within the 9 months I owned it.

The cartridge filer on my Malibu & former Mercedes C300 are convenient for being on the top of the engine, but the Malibu requires a very shallow socket to clear other obstacles under the hood.




The Enemy's gate is down.
 
Posts: 11048 | Location: Spring, TX | Registered: July 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
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I’ll see your Nissan engineers and raise with Austrian engineers whom I strongly suspect are related to German engineers.

My oldest son and I just pulled the supercharger off the Rotax motor in our SeaDoo.

Two hours. The first 30 minutes were spent removing things to get at the supercharger and remove it. The seat, air hose assembly, coolant reservoir, charge hose, supply hose, exhaust elbow and muffler.

The next hour and a half were spent removing the three bolts holding the supercharger to the engine. Of course thread locker was used when they were installed and they have external torx heads. Fortunately, I had the right socket to get the two bolts that cannot be seen. Unfortunately, the bolt in plain sight is threaded into the back of the supercharger between the supercharger and the engine. There’s no room for a socket and ratchet or any combination of swivel sockets either. I have no box wrench to fit an external torx head. The kit I bought included one made of chinesium that promptly stripped. It was malleable enough that I was able to beat it around the head of one of the bolts I had removed and make it work. An eight of a turn at a time the entire way out because of the thread locker. My son and I took turns. We took breaks when we dropped the chinesium wrench under the engine such that we had to fish it out with a magnet in a stick.
Ccs
The supercharger says Made in Austria, while my son pointed out other parts that said Made in Germany. Nobody mentioned the supercharger needed to be rebuilt every 100 hours or two years when we bought it.
 
Posts: 8105 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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