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USS Indianapolis - Live From the Deep was on PBS Sep 13 Login/Join 
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Yeah, that was three days ago and I missed it:

http://www.pbs.org/uss-indianapolis/home/

Hosted by Emmy Award-winning broadcast journalist Miles O’Brien, USS Indianapolis Live - From the Deep takes viewers through the wreckage of the Fifth Fleet’s naval flagship, which lies more than three miles below the surface of the Philippine Sea. Lost for more than 72 years, the U.S. Navy cruiser was found and positively identified in August through careful analysis of wreckage and markings by the expedition crew onboard the Research Vessel (R/V) Petrel, owned by Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul G. Allen.

Through a one-hour live exploration, USS Indianapolis Live - From the Deep will give viewers a tour of the wreckage from the World War II vessel that has rested at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean since its sinking in 1945. Produced for PBS by Vulcan Productions, Inc. and Miles O’Brien Productions, LLC, USS Indianapolis Live - From the Deep premieres Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 10/9c.

On the bright side, I can watch it here:

http://www.pbs.org/video/uss-i...rom-the-deep-iibll4/
 
Posts: 12203 | Location: Eastern Iowa | Registered: May 21, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Official Space Nerd
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Wow, thanks for the link. I was hoping I would be able to see this for the past 30 years. . .



No arsenal is so formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women.
Ronald Reagan
 
Posts: 19607 | Location: Hobbiton, The Shire, Middle Earth | Registered: September 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It was a well done show. Interesting that it is in considerably deeper water than the Titanic.
 
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california
tumbles into the sea
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Thanks.
 
Posts: 8607 | Location: NV | Registered: July 04, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just watched it through the link. Thank you for posting this.


A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master-and deserves one. Ronald Reagan, 1964, quoted from Alexander Hamilton
 
Posts: 1641 | Location: Southern Tennessee | Registered: February 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I also watched it through the link...wow....that was great.
 
Posts: 1937 | Location: St.Louis County MO | Registered: October 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Did you come from behind
that rock, or from under it?

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Thanks for posting. Amazing how well the ship was preserved by anoxic conditions and the cold.




Sic semper libtardis
 
Posts: 1756 | Location: 10th state | Registered: February 07, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am conflicted about this. I love history in general and WWII in detail but I am not sure I want to see this. To me it feels like disturbing a grave. It's amazing they found it, but too many good men lost their lives.





"You know, Scotland has its own martial arts. Yeah, it's called Fuck You. It's mostly just head butting and then kicking people when they're on the ground." - Charlie MacKenzie (Mike Myers in "So I Married an Axe Murderer")
 
Posts: 1629 | Location: Seacoast, NH | Registered: July 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Green Highlander:
I am conflicted about this. I love history in general and WWII in detail but I am not sure I want to see this. To me it feels like disturbing a grave. It's amazing they found it, but too many good men lost their lives.


They don't touch the ship. They treat it with respect and reverence. They said they would not take a single item from the wreck (I was hoping they would retrieve the bell, but they won't). They didn't even show personal effects strewn about the ocean floor (during a Bismarck wreck documentary, for example, they showed a boot). I think the only 'personal' item they showed was a bowl. They did this to remind us that the ship was once a home to hundreds of sailors, and many people likely ate from that bowl over the course of the years the Indy was in service.

To me, this documentary is very powerful, as it pays due respect to the men who died during and after the sinking. It's something that people need to see today. Most people don't even know about the Indy; many only know about her what they saw in the movie Jaws. This brings the tragedy much-needed attention, IMO.

I am VERY pleased that somebody finally found her. To me, this was the last important WWII ship wreck to be found and documented.*



*It would be neat to see all four Japanese carriers sunk at Midway; IIRC, they found Kaga and I've seen pics of Yorktown.

And, I would love to see the Scharnhorst, but I don't think she will ever be found.



No arsenal is so formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women.
Ronald Reagan
 
Posts: 19607 | Location: Hobbiton, The Shire, Middle Earth | Registered: September 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Just for the
hell of it
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quote:
Originally posted by Green Highlander:
I am conflicted about this. I love history in general and WWII in detail but I am not sure I want to see this. To me it feels like disturbing a grave. It's amazing they found it, but too many good men lost their lives.


It's always a line you have to walk in these situations. For people connected to those that lost their lives, this can a closer.


_____________________________________

Because in the end, you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain. Jack Kerouac
 
Posts: 14051 | Registered: March 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for throwing this up here. I'd have missed it and I'm glad I didn't.
 
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http://www.staradvertiser.com/...lm-showing-at-pearl/


A survivor of sinking disaster to attend isle film event

By William Cole
Posted October 12, 2017
October 12, 2017
Updated October 12, 2017 12:05am

John Woolston didn’t know what was being loaded onto his ship, the USS Indianapolis, in San Francisco in 1945, but the Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate had some suspicions.

“I read a lot and I was aware of things going on with uranium,” the 93-year-old Makiki resident said. “I knew, back of my mind, the existence of a probability of something like this happening.”

History soon confirmed that the heavy cruiser had transported to Tinian Island components of the “Little Boy” atom bomb that was air-dropped on Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, helping end the war in the Pacific.

The crew of the Indianapolis would pay a terrible price for their top-secret, high-speed delivery across the Pacific when the cruiser was sunk by a Japanese submarine between Guam and the Philippines on July 30 of that year.

Of a crew of 1,196, nearly 900 went into the water. Just 316 to 317 survived injuries, delirium, dehydration and sharks over nearly five days, forgotten by the Navy as they clung to life and each other floating in the sea. It was one of the worst disasters in Navy history.

Patrick Finneran, former executive director of the USS Indianapolis Survivors Memorial Organization, wrote in 1994 that the USS Arizona and USS Indianapolis were the alpha and omega of the war for the U.S. Navy.

The Arizona was sunk pierside at the start of the war, and Indianapolis “fought the good fight throughout the war, played such a key role in ending the war in the Pacific, saving hundreds upon thousands of American and allied lives, only to be the final casualty,” Finneran said.

In August, the wreck was discovered in 18,000 feet of water in the Philippine Sea.
On Friday, the Battleship Missouri Memorial will show the documentary “USS Indianapolis: The Legacy” on the fantail of the “Mighty Mo” in the film’s first screening in Hawaii.

Its makers said it took 10 years of filming and 104 interviews to craft the story of the ship and its crew. Just 19 survivors remain alive. A meet-and-greet will be held from 6:30 to 7 p.m., the screening is from 7 to 8:45 p.m., and a Q&A will be held from 8:45 to 9 p.m.

Woolston, damage control watch and junior repair division officer on the Indianapolis, and filmmaker Sara Vladic will be special guests.

The record-setting run across the Pacific, without ship escort, “was something that’s not usually done,” Woolston said in an interview. “But it was in an area that wasn’t considered particularly dangerous. And the high speed was helpful. The next one — I see no reason in the world why we weren’t given an escort.” The Navy knew of Japanese submarine activity in the area at the time.

The Indianapolis delivered the bomb to Tinian Island on July 26. On the way from Guam to the Philippines just after midnight on July 30, 1945, two torpedoes from the submarine I-58 slammed into the Indianapolis. Woolston had just gone to get coffee and a sandwich after finishing his watch.

“Almost immediately there was a loud, hollow, metallic boom from forward,” he said in a biography. “The ship shook and great whirling caterpillars of orange flame flew aft into the wardroom.”

The ship went down in 12 minutes. Woolston wound up in the water in a large group with Dr. Lewis Haynes, the chief medical officer. Haynes in a later account said black fuel oil got into the men’s eyes and noses. Those with life jackets supported men without jackets, he said.

And there were the sharks.

“There were plenty of sharks. You could see them. The water was crystal clear,” said one crew member in the film.

Added another: “First day, I think we lost maybe 20 that first day. The second day was carnage all over.”

Delirium from being in the water, which brought chills and fever, and dehydration took a heavy toll. Woolston recalled men taking off their life jackets and trying to drown others.

“I never gave up hope, even expectation, of rescue, though it was depressing when aircraft flew over without seeing us and there were no signs of search when we became overdue in port,” he said in the biography. Port officials were not required to report the non-arrival of the ship.

On Aug. 2, 1945, a PBY float plane landed and rescued 56 men, Woolston included. The remainder, including the ship’s commander, Capt. Charles B. McVay III, were picked up by ships.

The Indianapolis was sunk on July 30, but the Navy didn’t release the news until Aug. 15. Japan had just surrendered, and that overshadowed the tragedy at sea.

“I think it is a tale of things that went terribly wrong and people lived through it,” Woolston said. “It was the resiliency of the individual on one hand and the terrible loss that was effected because (the Navy’s ship-reporting rules) were not set up — because that should have never happened.”

For tickets to see the documentary, go to ussmissouri.org/ussindy.
 
Posts: 12203 | Location: Eastern Iowa | Registered: May 21, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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