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My daughter is looking for her first house and has found one that is affordable, however, there are two sets of high voltage lines running through every backyard, about 15-18 homes, all the way down the subdivision. These are the towers that appear to be maybe 100 feet tall with multiple arms holding the lines. I am reading that these are not safe to live under or near despite people living on the street now. What are the thoughts of anyone with knowledge on living under these lines? Thanks for any info.


Welcome to my home, that door you just kicked in, was locked for your protection, not mine.
 
Posts: 74 | Location: South St. Louis | Registered: November 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am going to have to go with a no on that one. I don't have anything definitive but always heard it was not good for your health but an even bigger issue for me would be resale down the road.
 
Posts: 434 | Registered: February 07, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Not safe how? "Teh Electromagic Waves!?!" ?

I don't have any too near me, but a line runs across the back of my neighborhood. It's probably a heckuva lot safer than the actual service lines buried in the neighborhood.

The only reason those lines depress the value of the houses in question is they're on an easement and you're allowed to do only certain things under them.. no buildings, no tall trees, it's only partially your yard. it can make for weird lopsided looking landscaping. plus people afraid of Teh Electromagic.
 
Posts: 198 | Location: Reidville, SC | Registered: October 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Junk science and health concerns aside, there are financial considerations:

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/...tate-value-2979.html

Lower Property Values

Proximity to power lines may lower a property’s value by as much as 30 percent, although that’s the higher end and usually refers to isolated incidents. A Rhode Island group, the Friends of India Point Park, is trying to have high-voltage power lines moved underground cites the 30 percent number on its website, and the documentation it uses shows that some studies confirm that number. Still, it’s reasonable to assume that power line proximity has an overall negative effect on value of at least 10 percent, and possibly more.

A 2013 study published in The Appraisal Journal found when comparing homes sales in Portland and Seattle in similar houses abutting and not abutting power lines, houses near power lines did sell for less, but not significantly so. With an average sale price of $291,000, researchers found a Portland home abutting a power line sold for approximately $5,000 less than a comparable home not near a power line. In Seattle, the average sale price was $502,000, and houses abutting a power line sold for approximately $12,500 less. The real question is, just how dangerous are power lines and how do they affect human health?
Electromagnetic Fields

Countless studies have been conducted on the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) generated by power lines and their affect on people. The problem is that these studies have not come to a definite conclusion. About half of the studies conclude there is no real risk, while approximately just over one-fifth cite DNA damage from long-term EMF exposure and one-third had mixed results. EMFs are rumored to cause cancer, birth defects or miscarriages, low birth weight and heart abnormalities, but again, evidence is inconclusive. Those studies that found some correlation between power lines and cancer, in particular, don’t address what distance is considered safe or how much exposure is needed to cause health problems.
Contact the Utility

If you fall in love with a property near power lines and resale value isn’t a concern, you can lay your fears to rest, or perhaps have them confirmed, by contacting the electric utility and requesting an on-site reading, according to real estate company Zillow. If you’re handy, you can conduct your own readings using a magnetometer. If you decide to buy, you’re making an informed decision based on the EMF levels near the home.


"No matter where you go - there you are"
 
Posts: 3511 | Location: Eastern PA-Berks/Lehigh Valley | Registered: January 03, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There is no issue except how it looks. I am an Electrical Engineer and one of my professors for antennas and magnetic fields brought up this issue in class once. He moved into a similar home. No issues at all. It might make reselling an issue because of other people being concerned for their safety (for no reason) or disliking the looks.

I would not buy it because of future resale issues.
 
Posts: 1264 | Location: Colorado | Registered: May 28, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Personally, I would not want to live under them. Electricity, especially in extremely high voltages isn’t something I would want to be a guinea pig as far as long term effects.
I have also noticed a quite annoying humming beneath the high voltage lines.
There are a lot of theories on the high voltage lines and effects on health. Some are probably exaggerated, some are probably accurate.

I don’t have any scientific facts to say, but I wouldn’t want to live under them.


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Posts: 518 | Location: Verde Valley, Arizona | Registered: November 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would not live next to them. They buzz and don't look great. Also it will reduce the pool of potential buyers when she looks to sell. Not worth the risk.





Do, Or do not. There is no try.
 
Posts: 1494 | Location: Charlotte, NC | Registered: February 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have worked for a number of EMF nutbags. They worry about 120v stuff in their homes and even cell/cordless phones.

I think EMF is BS in most cases, but I would never live near high voltage transmission lines. First due to magnitude difference between studies and voltages involved.



Jesse

A couple SIGs and a few others
 
Posts: 13527 | Location: Loudoun County, Virginia | Registered: December 27, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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i am with the "do not do it" crowd. The price is is not going to ever be low enough in my humble opinion.
In real estate the saying "location, location. location" is a very valid one.




"Practice like you want to play in the game"
 
Posts: 13558 | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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They buzz. Kind of ruins a quiet time outside. Wink







Sentiment without action is the ruin of the soul.


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Some people listen to the noise of the world,
And some people listen to the quiet.

"All Californians, like all citizens of the United States, have a fundamental Constitutional right to keep and bear common and dangerous arms. The nation’s Founders used arms for self-protection, for the common defense, for hunting food, and as a check against tyranny." Judge Benitez - March 2019
 
Posts: 10280 | Location: It was Lat: 33.xxxx Lon: 44.xxxx now it's CA :( | Registered: March 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Health concerns from what I understand are zero. Cosmetic and possible hummimg or a muffled buzz sounds are a possibility. If the last 2 issues are not a concern and the price is good perhaps I'd do it.Be nice to spend a day at the property just to see what the enviorment is like.
 
Posts: 153 | Registered: August 25, 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Striker in waiting
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If you’re worried about high voltage lines, then grab your tinfoil and start reading up on cell towers and chemtrails!

That said, they’re ugly and they certainly do buzz - especially when it’s humid. Some that are quiet will only buzz when it’s humid, so don’t be fooled.

I wouldn’t be worried about any health risks, though.

-Rob




I predict that there will be many suggestions and statements about the law made here, and some of them will be spectacularly wrong. - jhe888

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Posts: 15025 | Location: Maryland, AA Co. | Registered: March 16, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Having worked for Florida Power and Light Co in the Substations and Power Delivery for 25yrs, a few of us were given belts to wear for a study on EMF's in a high voltage environments. In Substations, aside from your usual ac/dc equipment control circuits, all the other equipment, transformers, breakers, regulators, capacitor banks, switches transmission/distribution voltages were anywhere from 13Kv to transmission voltages of 138Kv to 500Kv.

The study ran for a month and the belt devices were collected. All the recorded data was analyzed but the data was never released to us. There were very humid days where you could actually feel where the electromagnetic field perimeter started around transmission voltages. When working in the air around transmission voltage structures it wasn't uncommon that some idiot would reach out with a crescent wrench in hand and zap somebody in the ear. Your body would pick up a charge though your in the air and isolated. The spark would jump from the wrench to you, it bites, trust me. If you got close to a metal grounded tower frame the charge would jump from you to the metal tower from inches away, all equipment and structures were obviously grounded for safety reasons. It was not uncommon to bite you even through thick long sleeve cotton shirts that were required to wear for burn protection in the event of a proximity flash.

I've personally witnessed a friend on a 6' wooden ladder grounding a de-energized distribution line with a 8' fiberglass stick we called "shotguns", and he got too close to another energized 13Kv line, it flashed. Burned his shirt sleeve off and caught his hair on fire under his hardhat. He obviously went to the hospital and treated for electrical burns. The point of contact from him was over 8' away and tracked down the fiberglass shotgun and flash burned him. He was also treated for flash burns to the eyes, though we are required to wear special glasses in substations at all times.

I personally wouldn't live near those transmission lines, mostly because of my experiences and incident equipment failures. Though rare, you don't want to be anywhere in close proximity when it does occur, thats for sure.

I can't help to wonder if Nikola Tesla was onto something in transmitting high voltage power thru the air wireless..

This message has been edited. Last edited by: just1tym,


Regards, Will G.
 
Posts: 8269 | Location: 140 mi to Margaritaville, FL | Registered: January 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There are high power towers that run in the back of our subdivision. Homes located there take longer to sell, but eventually will sell, primarily because we live in a desirable location.

Personally I would not buy the home due to potential resale problems.
 
Posts: 1902 | Location: St. Louis, MO | Registered: November 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Don't Panic
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I am a bit skeptical of the concerns about power lines and health.

However, it is undeniable that there is a subset of humanity that doesn't like them/doesn't trust them - as can be witnessed in this thread. That depresses demand and thus value and resale value down the line.

Unless you can buy a wonderful house with a great yard in an otherwise perfect location at a steep enough of a discount compared to other nearby properties to factor that in, I'd keep looking.
 
Posts: 12411 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: October 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't think there is a health hazard but there would likely be a resale value hazard.
 
Posts: 42017 | Registered: July 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by just1tym:
Having worked for Florida Power and Light Co in the Substations and Power Delivery for 25yrs, a few of us were given belts to wear for a study on EMF's in a high voltage environments. In Substations, aside from your usual ac/dc equipment control circuits, all the other equipment, breakers, regulators, capacitor banks, switches transmission/distribution voltages were anywhere from 13Kv to transmission voltages of 138Kv to 500Kv....

....I personally wouldn't live near those transmission lines, mostly because of my experiences and incident equipment failures. Though rare, you don't want to be anywhere in close proximity when it does occur, thats for sure.

Then there is that practical reason - shit can break, and if it break next to your house, it can suck.
 
Posts: 42017 | Registered: July 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Used to take old fluorescent bulbs under the high voltage lines at my uncles at night to see them glow. Nice demonstration of EM energy.

I would have to wonder what it might do to a microchip in a pet.

Also could interfere with HDTV reception.


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Posts: 105 | Registered: October 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Even if there is absolutely no health risk at all - the simple perception by the general public that there is a risk means lower resale and a much longer time to get it sold. For me, I wouldn't want to be near the lines because it hurts radio reception - and I listen to shortwave as a hobby, and will eventually get into ham radio when I have time...
 
Posts: 822 | Location: Virginia | Registered: February 23, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would add that safety and safety training was paramount at Florida Power and Light, they never put work ahead of an employee's personal safety. We learned to respect electricity and it's potentials. Accidents do happen occasionally as with most hazardous job environments and all precautions were taken and countless hours of safety training, before a job, during, and regular monthly area meetings.

Just respect it's hazards and potential, common sense prevails, and take care to remain vigilant for yourself and others around you, always.

We'd otherwise still be in the stone age if it weren't for safe reliable power.


Regards, Will G.
 
Posts: 8269 | Location: 140 mi to Margaritaville, FL | Registered: January 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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