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My First Rattler Capture-Relocation! Login/Join 
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Congratulations from one herpetologist to another!
 
Posts: 150 | Registered: December 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Technically Adaptive
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Just wondering, is there a recommended snake bite kit to have available? or not bother with one. Do you have to identify between a mohave or diamond back for the doctor to help in getting treated?
Been in Arizona since 1994, try to avoid the mountains during summer, my hearing is bad, doubt I would hear one rattling, so far, I've been lucky, never been bit.
 
Posts: 1281 | Location: Willcox, AZ | Registered: September 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of henryaz
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quote:
Originally posted by rizzle:
Do you have to identify between a mohave or diamond back for the doctor to help in getting treated?

Yes! Mojaves have a neurotoxic venom in addition to the WD's tissue toxic venom, and are much more dangerous. Identifying a Mojave is usually easy because most are greenish. BUT, they can also take on a more grayish color depending on their environment. The black and white stripes on the tail are not 100% either. The surefire identifier is the top of the head. WD's scales on the head are like the rest of the body, small and lots of them. On the Mojave, there are either 2 or 4 very large scales on the head.
 
If the snake is greenish, it is a Mojave. If it is grayish, most likely it is a WD, but that is not 100% as it could be a Mojave. Mojave adults tend to be smaller, but that is a worthless identifier as you do not know the age of your snake.

There is a special antivenin for Mojaves, and it is not as widely distributed as the WD one.



When in doubt, mumble
 
Posts: 10753 | Location: South Congress AZ | Registered: May 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just moved this winter from Prescott Valley to upstate SC. Still not sure why.

Always thought the AZ snakes were more polite and rattled first,

Here I guess, you have to step on the copperheads to know their there
 
Posts: 1647 | Location: SC | Registered: December 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Technically Adaptive
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quote:
Originally posted by henryaz:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by rizzle:
Do you have to identify between a mohave or diamond back for the doctor to help in getting treated?

Yes! Mojaves have a neurotoxic venom in addition to the WD's tissue toxic venom, and are much more dangerous.
------------------------------------------------------
Thank you for your reply, don't know how I would react once bitten, I imagine getting a good look at the critter would not be high on the list Smile. I wander around the mountains mainly in the winter, bees are another problem around here, especially near the Gila river, but it's interesting country with a lot of history.
 
Posts: 1281 | Location: Willcox, AZ | Registered: September 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of pulicords
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quote:
Originally posted by henryaz:
quote:
Originally posted by rizzle:
Do you have to identify between a mohave or diamond back for the doctor to help in getting treated?

Yes! Mojaves have a neurotoxic venom in addition to the WD's tissue toxic venom, and are much more dangerous. Identifying a Mojave is usually easy because most are greenish. BUT, they can also take on a more grayish color depending on their environment. The black and white stripes on the tail are not 100% either. The surefire identifier is the top of the head. WD's scales on the head are like the rest of the body, small and lots of them. On the Mojave, there are either 2 or 4 very large scales on the head.
 
If the snake is greenish, it is a Mojave. If it is grayish, most likely it is a WD, but that is not 100% as it could be a Mojave. Mojave adults tend to be smaller, but that is a worthless identifier as you do not know the age of your snake.

There is a special antivenin for Mojaves, and it is not as widely distributed as the WD one.


Mojaves are very interesting rattlers and their colors vary, with some being nearly indistinguishable from Western Diamondbacks. I didn't know until I'd moved to AZ and taken the handling class, that Mojave rattlesnakes' venom is different depending upon the locality involved. Some of these have much more or far less quantities of neurotoxin vs hematologic qualities. Apparently this evolution has something to do with the type of prey found in the specific areas in question.


"I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."
 
Posts: 10159 | Location: The Free State of Arizona | Registered: June 13, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One other subtle identifier is the black and white bands at the tail. The WD is supposed to have even width, evenly spaced bands, while the Mojave is supposed to have wide white and narrow black bands. But, there is enough variation in this that one could resemble the other. One thing I have noticed, and I am not sure this is universally true, is that on the WD, the black and white bands are a much more vivid, deeper, richer color, while the mojave's bands tend to be duller.

For myself, if I can see the head, the sure-fire giveaway is the scales on the head (mentioned above). The two (or four) very large scales on the mojave are easy to spot at distance.



When in doubt, mumble
 
Posts: 10753 | Location: South Congress AZ | Registered: May 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by rizzle:
Just wondering, is there a recommended snake bite kit to have available? or not bother with one. Do you have to identify between a mohave or diamond back for the doctor to help in getting treated?
Been in Arizona since 1994, try to avoid the mountains during summer, my hearing is bad, doubt I would hear one rattling, so far, I've been lucky, never been bit.


The medically accepted reality is that none of the so called snake bite kits do any good, about the only recommended first aid is to get to medical attention.
None of the old school concepts like suction cups, constricting bands or incisions have ever proved any benefit
 
Posts: 3241 | Location: Finally free in AZ! | Registered: February 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by henryaz:
For myself, if I can see the head, the sure-fire giveaway is the scales on the head (mentioned above). The two (or four) very large scales on the mojave are easy to spot at distance.

Not when you're running the other way screaming like a little girl, they're not. Eek
 
Posts: 7216 | Location: Idaho | Registered: February 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Would you like
a sandwich?
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Just a curiousity question...

I have been told it is better to kill than to try and relocate a snake. Reason given was once relocated a snake will spend remander of its days trying to locate its home, and die in the process.

You mention training you have received, so it seems like you would know whether that is an old wives tale or not.



 
Posts: 1044 | Location: Virginia | Registered: October 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of pulicords
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quote:
Originally posted by Dreamerx4:
Just a curiousity question...

I have been told it is better to kill than to try and relocate a snake. Reason given was once relocated a snake will spend remander of its days trying to locate its home, and die in the process.

You mention training you have received, so it seems like you would know whether that is an old wives tale or not.


Just take a little bit of care when relocating. Find a spot no more than a couple miles away, with cover and food (like a pack-rat nest) and they'll be okay.


"I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."
 
Posts: 10159 | Location: The Free State of Arizona | Registered: June 13, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bookers Bourbon
and a good cigar
Picture of Johnny 3eagles
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When we lived in Arizona we used to catch and release wayward rattlesnakes some distance. Animal Control officers stated that relocating a rattlesnake more than 1/4 to 1/2 mile would result in the death of the snake. They asked us to contact them and they would euthanize the snakes.



BIDEN SUCKS.

If you're goin' through hell, keep on going.
Don't slow down. If you're scared don't show it.
You might get out before the devil even knows you're there.


NRA ENDOWMENT LIFE MEMBER
 
Posts: 7120 | Location: Arkansas  | Registered: November 06, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of pulicords
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quote:
Originally posted by Johnny 3eagles:
When we lived in Arizona we used to catch and release wayward rattlesnakes some distance. Animal Control officers stated that relocating a rattlesnake more than 1/4 to 1/2 mile would result in the death of the snake. They asked us to contact them and they would euthanize the snakes.


There's conflicting studies that show they can survive well, if released in areas within a mile and a half or so. One needs to evaluate the environment where the release is going to occur for a successful release. These "Animal Control" officers sound like they're just too lazy to make any effort.


"I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."
 
Posts: 10159 | Location: The Free State of Arizona | Registered: June 13, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I agree with your decision to relocate , rather than kill the rattler.... they have their place in the world too.... I had one "tall to me" when I was young, and we came to an agreement... I have killed more of them than I would care to remember,,,, not any more if I can help it.....
 
Posts: 58 | Location: jackson, California | Registered: April 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nice work pulicords.


-------------

The sadder but wiser girl for me.
 
Posts: 1054 | Location: Idaho Panhandle | Registered: July 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Help! Help!
I'm being repressed!

Picture of Skull Leader
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Those of you killing rattlers, apparently, some rattlers are "learning" not to rattle. This is more of an evolutionary process as the snakes that don't rattle live and the ones that do get killed.

So stop it! Smile
 
Posts: 11125 | Location: Big Sky Country | Registered: November 20, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Skull Leader:
Those of you killing rattlers, apparently, some rattlers are "learning" not to rattle. This is more of an evolutionary process as the snakes that don't rattle live and the ones that do get killed.

So stop it! Smile


Sounds like spiders, becoming reclusive and avoiding open areas, because of (negative) human interaction.. and equally horrifying. Thanks for that. >_<


Please support the SF "Help Mike!" campaign to raise legal fees for a 72 year old Texas teacher and hobby rancher who had 6 forgotten 9mm rounds in his checked luggage leaving T&C and faced 12 years in prison and $50k legal fees at https://fundrazr.com/b2KZgc.
 
Posts: 2021 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: April 24, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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