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Reloading Manual ... Speer 10 or upgrade ? Login/Join 
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Getting back into reloading after a couple decades of not ... and wondering if I should upgrade my reloading manual or am good to go with my Speer #10 I had used for years when I was reloading ?

Being conservative in my reloading, I do not hot load any of my reloaded ammo and stick with the middle to low end of the range in the book ... more often than not in the middle.

Thanks !


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Posts: 1972 | Registered: November 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
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The only thing the new book would have the old one doesn't is some new powders and bullets that weren't around when the old manual was printed.

As long as you can live with that, don't spend the money.
 
Posts: 7250 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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#10 is over 40 years old! Unless you're loading 38 Special with Bullseye or W231 only, get a new book!


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Posts: 8550 | Location: UT | Registered: December 05, 1999Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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https://www.marlinowners.com/t...d-references.281290/

That’s a link with a bunch of manuals, some older.

Sierra has a free app, all modern data. You can always go to the Hodgdon site, check their data.

I think it’s good to have an assortment of manuals & data. With some things vary a good amount. Right now I’m loading 45 acp near a +p range, 185 grain Sierra bullets. With Win-231/HP-38, Hodgdon data is anemic, Sierra lists higher charges. The H site or manual doesn’t even acknowledge +p for the round.

I usually do a lot of cross-referencing. I also have some old IMR-4227 I’m trying to use up. Older manuals are likely to offer light loads with some rifle rounds with that powder.
 
Posts: 4930 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Everything I am loading, both pistol and rifle, I have the powders that are listed in the #10 book ... 748, 760 4064, Unique, Red Dot, Bullseye, IMR 4227.

What would the new book have then for reloading data that my #10 book does not have ? I also have plenty of primers and bullets so nothing new there either.


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Posts: 1972 | Registered: November 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't mind getting a new manual, just want to make sure it is worth doing so.

Also, am wondering if there is a chemistry difference in powder (let just say 4064) that was made 30 years ago vs made in the last 10 or 5 years ? Would the powder data in the new manual work with the older powder ?


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Posts: 1972 | Registered: November 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I’d think the goal is to keep it’s close as possible, things change though. I thought there was an article in Handloader where they compared old powder to new with the same label, don’t remember the outcome. If so, could still vary among different powders, one’s close, the next varies.

They say data changes in part due to modern pressure testing, some list higher liability margins.

I don’t always set up my chronograph, but it’s helpful when evaluating loads. I’m usually not flirting with max anyway.

Individual loading techniques vary some, often cases, bullets, & other components don’t match exactly, with the book. There will always be a ‘range’ of powder charges with that in mind. Even with powder, you hear about potential ‘lot to lot variation’.
 
Posts: 4930 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
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quote:
Originally posted by old dino:
I don't mind getting a new manual, just want to make sure it is worth doing so.

Also, am wondering if there is a chemistry difference in powder (let just say 4064) that was made 30 years ago vs made in the last 10 or 5 years ? Would the powder data in the new manual work with the older powder ?


The only one that comes to mind is 2400. The .44 Magnum maximum load with the old powder was something like 2 grains more than with the new powder.

I don't do maximum loads personally, but for those who do it's something to think about.
 
Posts: 7250 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I, too, got back into reloading after a many-year hiatus.

As has been mentioned, there are a lot of new bullets and powders out there, so I have been going to the websites for the various manufacturers. They all offer data, so I print out what I need, and have compiled a fairly comprehensive notebook. One upside is I don't have pages of data for cartridges that don't interest me.

I find that the powder manufacturers are best for charge data and the bullet manufacturers are best for C.O.L.


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Posts: 51 | Registered: August 21, 2021Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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All very good points ... thank you !

I don't flirt with max loads either, but am a bit OCD with my loading. For example, though I set the throw weight, I individual weigh every fourth throw or so. If I want to be very anal, I weigh ever load.

I still think I will get up to date books as I embrace all the knowledge I can get.

Again, thank you all for educating and bringing this old guy back up to speed.


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Posts: 1972 | Registered: November 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think there’s enough free info out there, one doesn’t really need a new manual. That said, often it’s handy to have a hard copy.

Just one or to IPAs at the bar, the manual is well paid for. At least that’s part of my evaluation.
 
Posts: 4930 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
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If I were going to buy a new manual today, I'd never buy one from a bullet manufacturer or a powder manufacturer.

I'd buy either the Lee "Modern Reloading" as a first choice or second choice, the Lyman Manual.

Why? The Lee has more loads using different bullets and powders than any other loading manual out there, and Lyman is #2 in the amount of loads shown.
 
Posts: 7250 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Both good points. Especially the cost of IPAs and another reason why I brew my own. Smile

Gonna take a look at the Lee manual now.


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Posts: 1972 | Registered: November 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The Unmanned Writer
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I personally like having different books.

Hornady Speer, etc. I'd recommend getting the latest edition of a different publisher.









Only in an insane world are the sane considered insane.


The memories of a man in his old age
Are the deeds of a man in his prime


 
Posts: 13017 | Location: It was Lat: 33.xxxx Lon: 44.xxxx now it's CA :( | Registered: March 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
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Get a brand new one.

There are far more new powders etc listed now than when that existing book was published.

You may find what looks like a really good load using a newer powder.
.
 
Posts: 10103 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Gallo Pazzesco
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The newest SPEER (#15) is the finest reloading manual in history imho. 1/3rd of it is purely historical and in depth instructional and it has the finest background info on each cartridge bar none.

And no, their app is not current ... it's missing a lot of data. Especially missing data on their V Crown series and missing a lot of 300 BLK data.

These are mine, in my reloading room, plus I use various apps, etc., but these are the ones I go-to quite often.




EDITED: old man brain fart at 0100 hrs ... changed Sierra to SPEER.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Gallo Pazzesco,


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Posts: 58 | Location: South Carolina | Registered: September 18, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Plowing straight ahead come what may
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The newest in print reloading manuals I have are the Hornady 10th edition and the Modern Reloading manual from LEE…they are pretty up on the newer powders and bullets…a third excellent source of loading data is the Sierra online manual…

https://sierrabullets.wordpress.com/page/2/

The Speer reloading manual downloads are handy…with newer powder and calibers data…

https://www.speer.com/reloading/handgun-data.html


https://www.speer.com/reloading/rifle-data.html


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Making the best of what ever comes our way
Forget that blind ambition and learn to trust your intuition
Plowing straight ahead come what may
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Posts: 10279 | Location: Southeast Tennessee...not far above my homestate Georgia | Registered: March 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Don’t toss your 10th when you get a new one. Older manuals sell well on eBay.



Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and you will go on well. -Epictetus
 
Posts: 7207 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
Don’t toss your 10th when you get a new one. Older manuals sell well on eBay.


I don't toss manuals no matter how old they are ... always some kind of use down the road.

I still have a leather cover automotive manual from the early 1900s, as well as manuals from the 60s. 70s and 80s.

I like old manuals, like myself.


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Posts: 1972 | Registered: November 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
Tornados
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quote:
Originally posted by old dino:
quote:
Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
Don’t toss your 10th when you get a new one. Older manuals sell well on eBay.


I don't toss manuals no matter how old they are ... always some kind of use down the road.

I still have a leather cover automotive manual from the early 1900s, as well as manuals from the 60s. 70s and 80s.

I like old manuals, like myself.


And I love old maps. Old to really old.
.
 
Posts: 10103 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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