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A question on dented brass Login/Join 
Member
Picture of vthoky
posted
We went out this afternoon and put a few rounds through a recently-assembled AR (most of the components from Palmetto State) just for a quick function check. It works, so that's that.

But... I recovered the brass and noticed a dent in every one. The location is consistent, for what that's worth. Is this dent a big deal? Will it be problematic if we go to reload these?




Thanks, all.




God bless America.
 
Posts: 11168 | Location: Hokie Nation! | Registered: July 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of sourdough44
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Some guns dent more than others on ejection. We have an AK in 223, very rough on brass. I look them over, some I don’t try to reload, most I do.

With the dents pictured I would try a normal resizing. Sometimes I run them through the sizing die, rotate the case 180, then do it again. That may not matter or be required, just something I do.

After sizing I have a case/cartridge checker I use for samples, another check.
 
Posts: 4903 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Expert308
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Those cases are impacting something on their way out of the rifle. Either the edge of the ejection port or the case deflector. Either way it doesn't look nearly bad enough to worry about. Just do a regular full length resize on them. Any dent that's left after that will be fireformed out on the next firing (likely to be re-dented the same way they were the first time though, so don't be surprised to see this recurring).

I suppose that after enough firings the cases would become weakened in that area and eventually start to crack there. I can't say how many firings that would be, maybe somebody else has some empirical numbers on that. It's probably worth getting into the habit of visually inspecting them before reloading them, but it sounds like you're already doing that.

One thing you might consider doing is marking all of the cases somehow, a Sharpie maybe, to identify them as a batch (I'm presuming here that you initially obtained them all in a single purchase as opposed to picking up brass of unknown history on the range). When one or two of those cases eventually start to fail, then it may be time to toss the entire batch.
 
Posts: 6393 | Location: Portland, OR | Registered: February 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Try a heavier buffer on the AR and you might not get brass as badly dented.

Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

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Posts: 4155 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
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As others have said, the dents will iron out on the next firing and don't present any kind of a problem for reloading.

Load em up and shoot em.
 
Posts: 7105 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of vthoky
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quote:
Originally posted by Expert308:
It's probably worth getting into the habit of visually inspecting them before reloading them, but it sounds like you're already doing that.


I don't do a super-close inspection, but I do look closely enough to see a pattern like this.

quote:
Originally posted by Expert308:
I'm presuming here that you initially obtained them all in a single purchase as opposed to picking up brass of unknown history on the range


True. These pieces were new (as in never-before fired, though I've had them in inventory for a good long while).
I hadn't thought of marking batches, but that's certainly doable. I do usually shoot from a single batch when I get some range time, and I try to collect my own empties.

quote:
Originally posted by RNshooter:
Try a heavier buffer on the AR and you might not get brass as badly dented.


I definitely hadn't thought of that. Thank you!


quote:
Originally posted by Flash-LB:
As others have said, the dents will iron out on the next firing and don't present any kind of a problem for reloading.

Load em up and shoot em.


Good deal. Thanks, all.




God bless America.
 
Posts: 11168 | Location: Hokie Nation! | Registered: July 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
semi-reformed sailor
Picture of MikeinNC
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Normal, for any AR rifle. The brass is hitting the brass deflector hump on the side of the gun. You can choke down on the gas if you have an adjustable gas block and you may be able to change where it’s landing or even the amount of dent in the brass, but IMHO I wouldn’t bother. Most guns are over gassed so that they will feed a bunch of different ammo and still work.

The brass will reload just fine.

If you don’t change out buffers you can put a square of Velcro (the loop side) on the deflector bump and it will reduce or even remove the dent.



"Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than has any other factor.”
― Robert A. Heinlein

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Posts: 8674 | Location: Temple, Texas! | Registered: October 07, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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