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Member
posted
Hey all-

I inherited a few vintage Lyman ideal items. I was wondering if I should try to utilize them or send them off to a collector and buy modern s
I have a Lubricator and Sizer No. 45 with a 358 die and what looks like a heater attachment.
A No. 55 powder measure.
A single bullet mould marked 357 and another marked 452, I think.

I do want to get into casting but I would like to not be fighting the equipment. This stuff looks like it is from the 1950's and has boxes.

What do you think?

Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4155 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The #55 measure is a treasure, from what I read when I was looking at replacing the cheap crappy Lee measure that came with my Loadmaster (I ended up with a well used Pacific Tool & Gauge measure, the spiritual and physical successor to the Hornady LnL measure). Don't get rid of it.

The rest I don't know enough about to say one way or another.


"In order to understand recursion, you must first learn the principle of recursion."
 
Posts: 2862 | Location: Memphis, TN | Registered: August 23, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The wicked flee when
no man pursueth
Picture of KevH
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I use a #45 lubrisizer and a #55 powder measure all the time. They're superb quality tools made during an error when tools weren't disposable and cheaply made in China. Use them and take care of them.


A golf course is a terrible waste of a perfectly good rifle range. -Lt. Col. Dave Grossman
 
Posts: 3956 | Location: Contra Costa County, CA | Registered: May 28, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Non-Miscreant
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I still use a Lyman press. It just works. Every manner of dies, just what was available at the time. What are you loading and why. I would hope to make good, serviceable ammo, not to impress others. I'm impressed with good, working ammo.


Unhappy ammo seeker
 
Posts: 17923 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: February 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
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That stuff will last forever if you take care of it and there aren't many new things that work better. Faster, yes, but not better.
 
Posts: 7097 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It does look like solid stuff that hasn't been used in decades. I would like to get it set up and try it out.
Are parts/schematics/instructions available?
Do RCBS sizing dies fit? What lube? Heater optional?

Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4155 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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All quality stuff that will work as well as anything you can buy today.

Schematics are available using google-fu.

IIRC, RCBS sizing dies won't fit, but Lyman dies are more commonly available. Several sources carry both Lyman and RCBS/SAECO dies, as well as custom sizes.

No sense in asking what lube or if heater is optional unless you tell us what alloy you're using and how fast you're trying to push the bullet.

Check out Castboolits forums or get a Lyman cast bullet manual for more info on bullet alloy and lubes.
 
Posts: 624 | Registered: January 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Avoiding
slam fires
Picture of 45 Cal
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You are talking about some of the equipment on my bench,had for decades.
This lubasizer works well ,just slow.
I upgraded at a substanchel cost to the Starr
with all the bells and whistles.
 
Posts: 22239 | Location: Georgia | Registered: February 19, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The lube/sizer is definitely missing the wrenches. Not really sure what else. I will look for a manual, try to set it up, and see. Same for the powder measure.


Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4155 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Avoiding
slam fires
Picture of 45 Cal
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The lyman has the same wrench as the chapman gun tool set,I just checked my equipment,my stuff is old and I thought it strange they both use the same .
 
Posts: 22239 | Location: Georgia | Registered: February 19, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Non-Miscreant
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If the OP here hasn't reloaded, he needs to beg a friend to let him look on, or even to teach him (preferably using his stuff). I've given away bunches of reloading stuff, including several presses. Along with a couple of reloading sessions each. Makes me feel good to get someone started. Gotta make some phone calls tomorrow, to see if the guys are still active.

Last month I gave away a cigar box of cast .458 bullets to another friend. He and his grandson shoot .45-70 at deer. Yeah, I said "at". Big Grin


Unhappy ammo seeker
 
Posts: 17923 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: February 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had a lesson of a couple of hours, from a pro in Reno. I came away with some really precise 308 rounds that shot into a little bug hole group at 100 yards.
I haven't completed any rounds off my own bench, yet. I am very close. Learning to prep brass. I do need someone to help me feel comfortable that I have my dies dialed in before I want to start loading bullets into cases.
No experience, at all, with cast lead or casting.
I wish there was a place locally to get a few lessons.

Bruce






"The designer of the gun had clearly not been instructed to beat about the bush. 'Make it evil,' he'd been told. 'Make it totally clear that this gun has a right end and a wrong end. Make it totally clear to anyone standing at the wrong end that things are going badly for them. If that means sticking all sort of spikes and prongs and blackened bits all over it then so be it. This is not a gun for hanging over the fireplace or sticking in the umbrella stand, it is a gun for going out and making people miserable with." -Phillip K. Dick

“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4155 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
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quote:
Originally posted by RNshooter:
I wish there was a place locally to get a few lessons.

Bruce


Find a knowledgeable reloader (not just experienced) in your area. There have to be some around. If you go to the range, look at the boxes people carry their rounds in and you'll undoubtedly find one (most reloaders I know use plastic boxes instead of the factory ones non reloaders use). Ask him a few questions, offer to buy him a cup of coffee and you'll probably end up with an elmer.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Flash-LB,
 
Posts: 7097 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hop head
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my first press and powder measure are likely older than I am (brown, not red, painted Foster/Bonanza Co-Ax press and Bonanza powder measure)

obtained in the very early 90's from the estate of a Service Rifle shooter that shot from the 50's on,,

I have some reloading manuals dated in the 20's,

as mentioned, the old stuff is the good stuff,

my most modern presses are 90's vintage Dillons, the other 2 (besides the CoAx) are 60's or earlier,


and I have older dies as well (including a nice Videcki .30 cal bench rest seater)



www.chesterfieldarmament.com
 
Posts: 9205 | Location: Beach VA,not VA Beach | Registered: July 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by TacoFrank:
quote:
Originally posted by TacoFrank:
The Lyman 45 is a jewel! Simple, easy to use. Don't over stress the arm while sizing and you have a great lube sizer that will produce great sized and lubed bullets. I have two and would not trade them for their newer models.
You have come into possession of some great equipment. Powder measure is great too!
TF
 
Posts: 29 | Location: Kansas | Registered: May 15, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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