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How important to you is it to be able to shoot a MSR from both shoulders? Login/Join 
Sigforum K9 handler
Picture of jljones
posted
How important is to to you to be able to shoot a modern sporting rifle from both shoulders?

I understand the tactical use of the why, but am curious to how many people actually find it to be an important skill?

I’m neither hot nor cold about the topic, but it seems people are really for it (you’re an idiot if don’t practice it) or really against it for the same logic. It seems to be all the rage on the ‘gram.




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Posts: 35714 | Location: Logical | Registered: September 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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pretty much zero

like with any aspect of preparing / training / equipment etc you can 'what if' the scenarios to death

plus re. social media there has to be 'the latest' TTP 'imperative' to keep the clicks coming...

----------------------------------------


Proverbs 27:17 - As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.
 
Posts: 8794 | Location: Florida | Registered: September 20, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Prepared for the Worst, Providing the Best
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IMO, its important enough that you should know how to do it it, and understand the challenges that come with switching shoulders. If I was a SWAT guy or something like that, it would probably be even more important. But since I'm not clearing houses with a rifle on a regular basis, it's more of a tactic that I want to be capable of if needed, but is IMO not as important as other skills.

In an ideal world, I get it...you'd strive for perfection in everything. But realistically with training time and ammo constraints, I have to focus on the stuff I'm more likely to need. Left shoulder probably gets about 5% of my rifle training time.
 
Posts: 5344 | Location: In the Cornfields | Registered: May 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of powermad
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I'm cross eye dominate and have been using left side more as it's easier for me to use a scope with both eyes open.
I have to close my left eye when shooting right side and that gets tiresome after a bit, same with red dots.

It kinda screws up the mag placement on my belt though as my holsters are right side and I have to do a cross draw mag change when shooting a rifle left side.
 
Posts: 880 | Location: Portland Oregon | Registered: October 01, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Experienced Slacker
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Half of the cover in the world is left handed.
So, there's that...
 
Posts: 6871 | Registered: May 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Peace through
superior firepower
Picture of parabellum
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quote:
Originally posted by Sig209:
pretty much zero
Yeah, zero.

I don't even operate
 
Posts: 96401 | Registered: January 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
E tan e epi tas
Picture of cslinger
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If I was kicking in doors for a living…..yeah useful skill.

As luck has it I don’t have to kick in doors for a living so……..notsomuch for me.

Now I am not saying training up to and beyond the razor edge of a skill set Is a bad idea, I’m just saying I don’t have time for all that and will likely never have a need for it. Christ I am happy I can reload and keep the pointy flashy end in the right direction. Smile

…….3 days later due to karma being a fickle bitch cslinger was found dead because he had to poke too much of his body out into the cut if only he would have been able to left shoulder Smile


"Guns are tools. The only weapon ever created was man."
 
Posts: 6512 | Location: On the water | Registered: July 25, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've never tried the AR left handed, but know it's awkward with the rifles I have shot LH.

Not a bad skill to practice, though. May have to next time I'm at the range.




The Enemy's gate is down.
 
Posts: 10296 | Location: Spring, TX | Registered: July 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Freethinker
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It’s important if shooting from both shoulders is required for a competition one’s in or for something like a law enforcement qualification. Otherwise: No.

Long ago when another deputy and I developed my agency’s patrol rifle qualification course we had both been exposed to the requirement to shoot from our nondominant shoulders in the NRA LE instructor course (as I recall). It was therefore more or less our assumption that it needed to be in our qual requirement. Over the years since, though, I have given the question a lot of thought and watched countless officers struggle to do it at even a minimally acceptable level. I have come to the conclusion that teaching the technique and requiring it for qualification is a waste of time, effort, and ammunition that would be better spent on improving conventional shooting skills.

Shooting from one’s nondominant side shoulder can be mastered, but most shooters don’t, and probably can’t devote the time, effort, and ammunition that’s required to do that. If a shooter isn’t completely competent and comfortable with the technique there’s very little chance that he will attempt it in a defensive shooting situation—and shouldn’t. The technique is promoted and taught by some instructors because it allows better employment of cover in some situations. But as important as good use of cover can be, ultimately what’s more important is the ability to neutralize a deadly threat as fast as possible with accurate gunfire. Trying to use a method that’s slower to employ and is less accurate for most shooters is precisely what they shouldn’t be doing no matter what a good idea nondominant side shooting is in theory.




“The fundamental cause of trouble in the world today is that the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.”
— Bertrand Russell
 
Posts: 44817 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Not as lean, not as mean,
Still a Marine
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I was trained in "single arm, weak side" shooting while in the USMC. Never practiced it much after I got out.

I had 2 surgeries in 2 years on my strong side shoulder. I was frustrated and upset at missing numerous new shooting events at my range. Finally had enough, and once I was off the meds (but still in a sling) I took my carbine to one of the events.

It took a few rounds for the "rust" to wear off, but eventually it came back to me. I was loading, racking, and shooting all single hand, weak side, and I was having fun.

I don't shot that way very often anymore, but at least once a year I'll practice it (both AR and Pistol). I've noticed that doing it just once a year really cuts down on any overthinking and I'm able to transition much quicker/smoother now.




I shall respect you until you open your mouth, from that point on, you must earn it yourself.
 
Posts: 3102 | Location: Southern Maine | Registered: February 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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How do we determine the location of the "try-hard" or "LARPing" line, as citizen shooters? I think, if someone's training and practice is motivated by a self-defense or preparedness mindset, that shooting from your "off-hand" shoulder is an important thing to at least be familiar with. As mentioned above, a great deal of cover you may utilize will be oriented such that switching shoulders will have you utilizing it to a fuller extent.

I sometimes think that those of us who are worried about not seeming "try-hard" are actually trying harder than those we perceive to be LARPers or "tacti-fools".

However, we can always count on sigfreund for valuable nuggets such as this; well said, sir...
quote:
If a shooter isn’t completely competent and comfortable with the technique there’s very little chance that he will attempt it in a defensive shooting situation—and shouldn’t. The technique is promoted and taught by some instructors because it allows better employment of cover in some situations. But as important as good use of cover can be, ultimately what’s more important is the ability to neutralize a deadly threat as fast as possible with accurate gunfire. Trying to use a method that’s slower to employ and is less accurate for most shooters is precisely what they shouldn’t be doing no matter what a good idea nondominant side shooting is in theory.
 
Posts: 577 | Location: Northeast GA | Registered: February 15, 2021Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My own personal choice I try things that I feel are really Plan B or Plan C so it isn't a complete surprise about the issues if I get there due to circumstances. But in this particular case of shooting from both shoulders many of the rifle matches I go to require you to shoot from cover on both sides. So this I practice regularly for that. Same with shooting through a port. I can't imagine I would ever do it in real life but we do it all the time at matches and it requires some specific adjustments. I feel better prepared for the zombie apocalypse with these skills so I practice them (and it helps my scores too).


“So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.”
 
Posts: 9865 | Registered: October 14, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
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Being ambidxtrious, it's just something that I can do, so I do it from time to time to keep in practice.
 
Posts: 7788 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bolt Thrower
Picture of Voshterkoff
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Probably more important than I place it at. I don’t use pads/remote buttons on any of my lights or lasers.
 
Posts: 9402 | Location: Woodinville, WA | Registered: March 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Peace through
superior firepower
Picture of parabellum
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Shit, I'll probably go dual-wielding anyhow, so...
 
Posts: 96401 | Registered: January 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by jljones:
It seems to be all the rage on the ‘gram.

I'll take your word for it, as I've never been on it. Doubt that I ever will.

A few times a year in steel-target competitions, the match directors throw in a stage which requires shooting from the weak side. Sometimes from prone, sometimes from a WTF barrier. Always on the clock. Sometimes with a precision bolt action, sometimes from a carbine.

If competitors want better scores, they'll practice shooting from both shoulders. From barriers & unstable positions. Maybe from slings. Definitely from bags & tripods. Definitely from uncomfortable positions. Transitioning among different targets and different shooting locations. All at speed.

We're driven to do this because shooters just became too good at prone positions with a bipod and rear bag. Match directors needed another way to separate the truly skilled shooters from those who are less capable. Whether or not any of this is applicable to general shooting is an individual view.
 
Posts: 7139 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Voshterkoff:
Probably more important than I place it at. I don’t use pads/remote buttons on any of my lights or lasers.

In regards to controlling illumination and lasers, I am of the mind that I am going to default to only switching shoulders, not hands. Switching hands on the gun is reserved for injury or a circumstance that requires it for some other reason.
 
Posts: 577 | Location: Northeast GA | Registered: February 15, 2021Reply With QuoteReport This Post
E tan e epi tas
Picture of cslinger
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quote:
Originally posted by parabellum:
Shit, I'll probably go dual-wielding anyhow, so...


You will, of course, release a flock of doves first as you come out dual wielding. Only way to tactiwoo. Smile


"Guns are tools. The only weapon ever created was man."
 
Posts: 6512 | Location: On the water | Registered: July 25, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oriental Redneck
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I shoot from my belly.


Q






 
Posts: 22046 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like to be slightly proficient weak side, but not something I do much of these days. Years ago yes, mostly with pistols. Had one in particular I only shot left handed.

I've had occasion in matches to shoot rifles and shotguns weak side, either forced by stage design or by choice. When by choice it was always because I wanted to try something unorthodox. "I know this is a bad idea and will end up being slower and a mistake, but damn I want to see if I can pull this off!" Big Grin


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