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Picture of abnmacv
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Guns are in a gun safe as is small amount of ammo. The rest of the ammo in surplus 30cal and 50cal OD containers. Sort of messy and in todays times don't like it sitting in the basement floor, want it out of sight. Looking though a catalog I see Knaack job-site chests. Anyone use the or similar trunk like containers, with a lock, to store ammo and keep it out of view?


U.S. Army 11F4P Vietnam 69-70 NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 896 | Registered: June 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
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I've never made any attempt to hide ammo and would have to have a number of containers for it if I did.

OTOH, I don't have kids or strangers going through my house either.
 
Posts: 6829 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Do have a toddler grandchild so protection is an issue. Didn't plan on having strangers in my basement and then the furnace died which meant someone I could not watch all day. In today's world I take precautions I wouldn't have considered a decade ago.


U.S. Army 11F4P Vietnam 69-70 NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 896 | Registered: June 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Knaack job boxes work great for ammo.

Bruce





"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child — miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosophy of sniveling brats."
-PJ O'Rourke
“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all. -Mencken
 
Posts: 4151 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ammo (and powder) should be stored in containers that would contain pressure if there were a fire.
 
Posts: 55 | Location: Boston | Registered: May 22, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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RKG any suggestion for ammo storage other than a gun safe? I have considered that option.


U.S. Army 11F4P Vietnam 69-70 NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 896 | Registered: June 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I stocked up on 50 cal surplus ammo boxes when they were plentiful and cheap. It's the best thing I've found after all they are designed to hold and protect ammo from the environment and some will accept a padlock. I have them out of sight in a upstairs bedroom sitting in a closet. Must have a dozen of them filled and another half dozen out in garage empty.

Buddy of mine works for the FD and I told him where I store it in the event of a fire. Not sure how long the surplus ammo boxes will withstand a fire. We have a built in hope chest in the upstairs bedroom that looks more like a sitting bench than it does a chest. If I didn't know it was a chest I wouldn't think to try to open it. It's the type where the top lifts up. I started storing my shotguns, Scorpion carbine some ammo and empty gun boxes and other accessories in there. I just bought a RFID lock for it but need to install it yet.


"Fixed fortifications are monuments to mans stupidity" - George S. Patton
 
Posts: 7528 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: June 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by RKG:
Ammo (and powder) should be stored in containers that would contain pressure if there were a fire.


This 26 minute video "Sporting Ammunition and the Fire Fighter: What Happens When Ammo Burns?" tests how fire affects ammo.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SlOXowwC4c
 
Posts: 14993 | Location: Eastern Iowa | Registered: May 21, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Freethinker
Picture of sigfreund
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quote:
Originally posted by RKG:
Ammo (and powder) should be stored in containers that would contain pressure if there were a fire.


So the pressure would be contained until it was enough to cause a catastrophic explosive pressure release? Confused

I strongly recommend that anyone who still believes that small arms ammunition poses a serious danger to anyone in a house fire review the video Sigmund linked.




“To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.”
— Thomas Paine
 
Posts: 43994 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
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It's good advice, if you absolutely, positively, have to make sure your house blows up... Y'know, when you really want to ensure that you get the maximum insurance payout. Big Grin

 
Posts: 27486 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I store pretty much all ammo in a .30 cal or .50 call ammo can, minus what is in my range bag or in a magazine. The .22LR you see has since moved to a few .30 cal cans, I had run out when pic taken. I keep the cans in an old Sentry “Safe” I had - but for two simple reasons...if someone breaks into my house, I don’t want it “easy” for them to take my cans. Ammo is expensive, even more so now. Second, it is a “fire” safe albeit a cheap security cabinet so a bit more resistant to any event. I do have it somewhat out of the way also, bolted down, etc. Overflow goes in right side of my Fatboy Jr where I keep my Pmags, etc.

BTW, wonder where that video Sigmund posted is from - there is a really cool old “Connie” Constellation in Air Force colors in the background.






“Forigive your enemy, but remember the bastard’s name.”

-Scottish proverb
 
Posts: 1999 | Location: South Florida | Registered: December 24, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Non-Miscreant
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quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:



Well, Rogue, that's how I imagine my house going if the ammo dump in the basement ever goes off. Got any information on that little pix?

Back to the subject at hand. I suggest everyone have a drive out basement or at least a drive up entrance. Those are easy to protect, just use a steel door with lots of anchors to the foundation. You make it "drive up" because ammo is heavy. Then you get a concrete truck, or hire one to pour a little in a reinforced corner about 6" thick, give or take. If its in the corner, you have 2 walls supported by 10'+ of earth/rock. That part is easy. Pour the other 2 walls the same thickness, using a fair amount of reinforcing rod (just for fun and good measure.) with those walls poured you have a good start. Not sure why the OP is worried about moisture, but just sticking those ammo boxes on a nice 1" board will do the trick. 1x10s will do just fine. Squeezes the wood to make them less absorbent. Smile In a dry basement, you won't see much of a problem.

I wanted to do a floor out of the encapsulated gravel stuff, just for appearances. But then I realized I didn't really care how it looked, and I don't want anyone else wandering around my gun room or ammo dump. You can also keep your pennies and nickels safe in there. Since it also houses my reloading stuff, you could just consider it one huge reload, ready to pop. If 6" of concrete with steel bars inside won't keep it safe, I don't know what will except 12" or maybe 12'


Unhappy ammo seeker
 
Posts: 17850 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: February 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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