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Picture of powermad
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I use test lights all the time and have more than a few.
I lost a cool mini Snap-On test light.
About 3 years later I opened the fuse panel on a truck to check them and found it laying on top of the fuses. Now I have one at home..

The LED one that I got off of the Mac truck has a probe with different screw on attachments for test leads and such, I use that one the most now.
 
Posts: 807 | Location: Portland Oregon | Registered: October 01, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Go Vols!
Picture of Oz_Shadow
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A Lisle hand impact driver. Good cheap US made tool. You may need better bits.

https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-2...id=1633911145&sr=8-6
 
Posts: 16984 | Location: SE Michigan | Registered: February 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
Tornados
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by powermad:
quote:
The test lamp has a sharp metal point that is able to pierce wiring for testing, or maybe wiggle into a connector without struggling to disconnect everything.


Ugh.. Pokey Mctestlight has caused me more grief than I care to think about.
Breaking the insulation is a great spot to start growing a green patch and breaking the circuit later on.
Or spreading the sockets in a plug and wrecking it.

I have back probes and sets of different pin and socket test leads.
Lets you check pin tension as well to see if someone has jammed a test light in it.

I finally upgraded my old Fluke meter for a nifty Snap-On one, I have it synced to my phone so I can move to different areas and see what's going on without dragging 10' of test leads around.
Pretty handy for shaking down a harness looking for an intermittent short.

I do have quite a few Blue Moon tools.
I think I spent $80 on a set of hose clamp pliers that I only needed once.
Lots of stuff like that and that's just home tools.


Ah Ha!!!! You're one of those professional guys! Just remember, you make money off us amateurs, lol.

Thanks for chiming in, you brought very valid and very important things.
.
 
Posts: 10107 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His diet consists of black
coffee, and sarcasm.
Picture of egregore
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This is my favorite tool. I found it at a flea market for $40 and have had it at least 25 years. I've never seen anything like it before or since.



It is made to adjust automotive carburetors and also came with the little funky-shaped sockets that carb mixture screws have. Since the last carbureted auto engine was made c. 1991, I don't use it for carbs much, but it is a godsend for removing (once broken loose) or starting small bolts and screws in tight spaces, especially in conjunction with magnetized sockets. NO ONE is ever allowed to borrow it, because I'm afraid they will try to break loose or tighten a screw and strip the gears or otherwise damage it. (The picture is blurry, but it says right on it, "LIGHT DUTY - FOR LOOSE SCREWS ONLY.")
 
Posts: 25040 | Location: Johnson City/Elizabethton, TN | Registered: April 28, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
My other Sig
is a Steyr.
Picture of .38supersig
posted Hide Post
I use a 1/2" double jointed wheel alignment ratchet for just about everything.


 
Posts: 7140 | Location: Somewhere looking for ammo that nobody has at a place I haven't been to for a pistol I couldn't live without... | Registered: December 02, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Vagabond Dreamer
Picture of Patrick-SP2022
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If anyone is interested in a box leveling gauge, Lee Valley has a set of 2 gauges for sale on their site for $30.
The set includes a height gauge and box leveling gauge.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-u...-gauges?item=99W6306

I have bought lots of stuff from Lee Valley in the past and have gotten good service out of their products.



You've got to stand for something or you'll fall for anything.

Let’s go Brandon!
 
Posts: 3647 | Location: Texas | Registered: April 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of sigcrazy7
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I don't know if it qualifies as specialized anymore, but a laser level on a tripod are awesome. I've installed kitchen cabinets using standard levels, and then my brother brought down his laser level. Wow! It made the job super fast and accurate. I bought my own later that day.

Might as well add a laser measure to the list as well. No more trying to span a distance with a measuring tape, only to have it fold before you can read it.



Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and you will go on well. -Epictetus
 
Posts: 7210 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Captain Morgan
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I have an adjustable wrench, actually 3, made by Hand Tool Rescue. They are turn of the century adjustable wrenches and are being remade by this company.

They hold on to a nut or bolt better than any new adjustable wrench I have ever used.

Hand tool rescue



Let all Men know thee, but no man know thee thoroughly: Men freely ford that see the shallows.
Benjamin Franklin
 
Posts: 3548 | Location: Sparta, NJ USA | Registered: August 16, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of cyanide357
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by egregore:
This is my favorite tool. I found it at a flea market for $40 and have had it at least 25 years. I've never seen anything like it before or since.

...

It is made to adjust automotive carburetors and also came with the little funky-shaped sockets that carb mixture screws have. Since the last carbureted auto engine was made c. 1991, I don't use it for carbs much, but it is a godsend for removing (once broken loose) or starting small bolts and screws in tight spaces, especially in conjunction with magnetized sockets. NO ONE is ever allowed to borrow it, because I'm afraid they will try to break loose or tighten a screw and strip the gears or otherwise damage it. (The picture is blurry, but it says right on it, "LIGHT DUTY - FOR LOOSE SCREWS ONLY.")


Looks like a similar tool is made by Motion Pro (tools for motorcycles): Carb Tool 90 Degree w/Bits
 
Posts: 198 | Registered: November 24, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His diet consists of black
coffee, and sarcasm.
Picture of egregore
posted Hide Post
Snap-on Tech-Angle torque wrenches, for torque-to-yield bolts that are tightened to an angle specification. In automotive applications, almost every cylinder head bolt on engines made in the last ~25 years is a TTY. In confined spaces such as a V8 engine with the rearmost cylinders under the windshield cowl, it is difficult to read a torque angle gauge, let alone makeshift methods like match-marking the bolt head.

(stock photo)
 
Posts: 25040 | Location: Johnson City/Elizabethton, TN | Registered: April 28, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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