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The Knipex thread got me thinking about some the specialty tools that I have that I don't NEED, but really are worth it.

I spend a lot of time in substation control panels commissioning, troubleshooting, upgrading, etc. and the tool I go to most often is a set of ACT cable tie cutters to, well, cut cable ties. A set of dykes work just fine and almost everyone uses them, but the ACT ones have a little hook at the end that prevents you from cutting into the insulation of the wires. It also allows you to grab the cable tie from behind and pull it out while you cut it. It's one of my favorite tools.



A tool that rocked my world last year was a set of hose picks I bought on a whim. I've owned and winterized inboard boats for about 20 years and I always pull all the hoses off to drain and fog the engine. Last year was the first year I didn't bust a knuckle or bleed in the process. I got all those hoses off in less than 5 minutes. The set was well worth the $20-$30 I spent on it.





What specialty tools do you all hold dear?


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Posts: 585 | Location: Raleigh, NC | Registered: May 15, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
semi-reformed sailor
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Had a pair of safety wire pliers- called mousing pliers when I was in the service. Had them for about 20 years, during my last move they disappeared. I don’t work on guns/machine guys/cannons requiring mousing anymore, so it’s not a big deal-but I’d had them since 1990.

My other specialty tool is the armorers wrench for the M16. Now I have had this one since 1990.

I still have a staking tool I got back them too. It’s for staking front sights on the 1911 and I also used it for staking shell latches on the Remington 870.






"Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than has any other factor.”
― Robert A. Heinlein

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Posts: 8821 | Location: Temple, Texas! | Registered: October 07, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Three Generations
of Service
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A set of ratcheting crimpers with various sets of dies.

Red/Blue/Yellow for crimping automotive connectors, a set for coaxial cables and a set for telephone and Cat 5 connectors.

Another set of crimpers for the un-insulated style that have ears that roll over and crimp into the wire. Used for bullet style connectors on motorcycle wiring, among other applications.

Also have several de-pinning tools for taking multi-pin connectors apart.




Be careful when following the masses. Sometimes the M is silent.
 
Posts: 13829 | Location: Downeast Maine | Registered: March 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Invest Early, Invest Often
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A good tool box....so you can find the tool when you need it.
 
Posts: 959 | Location: Escaped California...Now In Sunny, Southern Utah | Registered: February 15, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
Tornados
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Fencing pliers. Not a new tech thing, they’ve been around ever since barbed wire came out, way way over a hundred years ago, maybe 150 years.

I no longer have any need to fix any wire type fence but I find myself reaching for one of my several fencing pliers more and more, they do a lot more than fix wire fences. Quite versatile and sturdy.

Similar to the OP’s post of radiator hose removal tools, I’ve had for almost 30 years a Snap On Tools radiator hose removal tool. It’s on a big beefy screwdriver type handle and a very strong metal shaft and hook. It won’t take no for an answer on any coolant hose.

Heel Bars. We all have some sort of pry bars, or should have, but when the right situation comes up nothing works better than a heel bar.

Snap On brand 1/4 inch very small hand ratchet but with a 3/8 drive head. When your problem is in a tiny space.

Impact tool. Not the electric or pneumatic tool, but the one you smack with a hammer. It has interchangeable bits for Phillips and flat head big screws. The impact only turns a little when you smack it with a hammer, this prevents cam outs and stripped heads, and the impact helps knock it loose. Very mature low tech, nothing new.

What looks like a big pair of scissors but is actually metal cutting super shears from a roofing supply house. Not tin snips! When you need to cut something and don’t want to screw around wasting time and fighting it. Cuts flashing and similar metal in a heartbeat with no effort.
.
 
Posts: 10120 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't use it much anymore, but one of the finest tools I own for its intended purpose is an Imperial Eastman 37 degree AN flaring tool. Back when I was doing a lot of work on race cars, it was invaluable and there is no cheaper substitute worth a shit.
 
Posts: 2087 | Location: WI | Registered: December 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by OKCGene:
Impact tool. Not the electric or pneumatic tool, but the one you smack with a hammer. It has interchangeable bits for Phillips and flat head big screws. The impact only turns a little when you smack it with a hammer, this prevents cam outs and stripped heads, and the impact helps knock it loose. Very mature low tech, nothing new.


I've got one of these and have used it maybe 5 or 6 times in the last 15 years, but when you need it, you need it. Usually on a rusted brake rotor that has a frozen holding screw.


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Posts: 585 | Location: Raleigh, NC | Registered: May 15, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fire begets Fire
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Peterson wave rake in .025” and medium hook in .018”

Multi-pic is good too (German)





"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine under which a man accepts the benefits of the social group without being willing to pay - and claims a halo for his dishonesty."
~Robert A. Heinlein
 
Posts: 23217 | Location: Row 2F | Registered: February 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Left handed buoy tightener...I worked ocean rescue in college and as a rookie, the crew had me running up and down the beach asking for one...never found it....nor the bucket of steam...geesh...


Don't. drink & drive, don't even putt.


 
Posts: 1195 | Location:  | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
SIGforum Official
Eye Doc
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quote:
Originally posted by KDR:
The Knipex thread got me thinking about some the specialty tools that I have that I don't NEED, but really are worth it.

I spend a lot of time in substation control panels commissioning, troubleshooting, upgrading, etc. and the tool I go to most often is a set of ACT cable tie cutters to, well, cut cable ties. A set of dykes work just fine and almost everyone uses them, but the ACT ones have a little hook at the end that prevents you from cutting into the insulation of the wires. It also allows you to grab the cable tie from behind and pull it out while you cut it. It's one of my favorite tools.



A tool that rocked my world last year was a set of hose picks I bought on a whim. I've owned and winterized inboard boats for about 20 years and I always pull all the hoses off to drain and fog the engine. Last year was the first year I didn't bust a knuckle or bleed in the process. I got all those hoses off in less than 5 minutes. The set was well worth the $20-$30 I spent on it.





What specialty tools do you all hold dear?


What purpose do the picks serve in hose removal? I usually just loosen the hose clamps to pull hoses for winterization.
 
Posts: 2599 | Location: (Occupied) Northern Minnesota | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Insert the pick between the hose and hose barb to break the seal. A lot easier then just pulling, especially when access is tight. I manage to scrap and bang my knuckles pulling hoses off with just my hands.


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Posts: 585 | Location: Raleigh, NC | Registered: May 15, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Drug Dealer
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Is it safe? Razz




When a thing is funny, search it carefully for a hidden truth. - George Bernard Shaw
 
Posts: 15047 | Location: Virginia | Registered: July 03, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by TomV:
A good tool box....so you can find the tool when you need it.


This. For 10+ years my Craftsman was too full and made it difficult to find stuff.

For Father's Day, the kids pitched in and bought me a 42" Craftsman. Same amount of tools, but now I have space around the tools to see where everything is and much easier to keep organized.

My newest tool purchase is ratcheting box end wrenches. I'm late to the party.


P229
 
Posts: 3326 | Location: Sacramento, CA | Registered: November 21, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by KDR:



Also useful if your ass itches a lot.



Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and you will go on well. -Epictetus
 
Posts: 7219 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have some older houses, like 1930s/1940s. Sometimes the wires in the outlets are too short, and when I need to strip them, it can be a pain.

I don't use these much, but when I need them, they work great for stripping back short wires.



Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and you will go on well. -Epictetus
 
Posts: 7219 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Russ59:
quote:
Originally posted by TomV:
A good tool box....so you can find the tool when you need it.


This. For 10+ years my Craftsman was too full and made it difficult to find stuff.

For Father's Day, the kids pitched in and bought me a 42" Craftsman. Same amount of tools, but now I have space around the tools to see where everything is and much easier to keep organized.

My newest tool purchase is ratcheting box end wrenches. I'm late to the party.


I've got a 42" 2 piece tool box and a 60" tool box with a wooden work surface on top, both Husky brand. They were both relatively cheap by tool box standards, but meet my needs for home use perfectly. all the drawer's are labeled and everything has a place. I even keep hardware organized in a couple of the drawers. Makes life so much easier. It's also very easy see when the wife has borrowed a tool and I've got to go hunt it down.


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Posts: 585 | Location: Raleigh, NC | Registered: May 15, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
I have some older houses, like 1930s/1940s. Sometimes the wires in the outlets are too short, and when I need to strip them, it can be a pain.

I don't use these much, but when I need them, they work great for stripping back short wires.


I might have to get a pair of these. I can think of two times this Summer those would have come in handy.


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Posts: 585 | Location: Raleigh, NC | Registered: May 15, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by SIGnified:
Peterson wave rake in .025” and medium hook in .018”

Multi-pic is good too (German)


Lock Picking Lawyer, is that you? Haha.


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Posts: 585 | Location: Raleigh, NC | Registered: May 15, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Working on my dirt bikes, I have a ton of job-specific tools; flywheel pullers, fork cartridge holders, seal drivers, engine lock-up tools, etc.


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Posts: 8550 | Location: UT | Registered: December 05, 1999Reply With QuoteReport This Post
eh-TEE-oh-clez
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Klein Tools 935DAG Digital Electronic Level and Angle Gauge, Measures 0 - 90 and 0 - 180 Degree Ranges, Measures and Sets Angles https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07Z...VPTXBMCA9R3BVG9TK1AW

This digital level and angle gauge gets high praise.

Set it atop a shelf or picture frame and read off the level without having to get directly in front of and squint at a bubble. And, with a bubble, you are really never sure if you get the bubble directly in between the two indicator marks.

You can zero it off against a surface and measure angles off of the surface. This is good for setting square for table saws, circular saws and etc, but also good for setting precise angles on bevels.
 
Posts: 12353 | Location: Orange County, California | Registered: May 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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