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Christmas Eve Launch of the James Webb Space Telescope planned. Login/Join 
Oh stewardess,
I speak jive.
Picture of 46and2
posted Hide Post
About 30days to position and unfolding, and about 180days before we'll see the first photos.

I think.

From elsewhere:

quote:
TImeline of key events for the launch and deployment of James Webb Space Telescope, courtesy of Jonathan McDowell:

L+00:00: Launch
L+27 minutes: JWST separates from Ariane-5
L+33 minutes: JWST solar panel deployment
L+12.5 hours: JWST MCC-1a engine maneuver
L+1 day: JWST communications antennae deploy
L+5-8 days: Sunshade deployment
L+15-24 days: Mirror deployment
L+36 days: Begin telescope commissioning
L+124 days: Complete telescope commissioning
L+180-210 days: First images (Early Release Observations)
 
Posts: 25613 | Registered: March 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by 46and2:
NASA tracker, showing Webb's current location.

https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/...nch/whereIsWebb.html

That's a really cool page.
 
Posts: 12735 | Location: Wine Country | Registered: September 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oh stewardess,
I speak jive.
Picture of 46and2
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by corsair:
quote:
Originally posted by 46and2:
NASA tracker, showing Webb's current location.

https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/...nch/whereIsWebb.html

That's a really cool page.

The Voyager one is even cooler, have you seen it?

Here:

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/m.../#where_are_they_now

And (loads a graphic rendering):

https://eyes.nasa.gov/apps/orrery/#/sc_voyager_1
 
Posts: 25613 | Registered: March 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by 46and2:
quote:
Originally posted by corsair:
quote:
Originally posted by 46and2:
NASA tracker, showing Webb's current location.

https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/...nch/whereIsWebb.html

That's a really cool page.

The Voyager one is even cooler, have you seen it?

Here:

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/m.../#where_are_they_now

And (loads a graphic rendering):

https://eyes.nasa.gov/apps/orrery/#/sc_voyager_1

Big Grin I've wasted nearly two hours and my family is wondering where I am....
 
Posts: 12735 | Location: Wine Country | Registered: September 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Void Where Prohibited
Picture of WaterburyBob
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It's just about out the distance of the moon now. I hope the Sunshade deployment works tomorrow.



"If Gun Control worked, Chicago would look like Mayberry, not Thunderdome" - Cam Edwards
 
Posts: 16040 | Location: Under the Boot of Tyranny in Connectistan | Registered: February 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Waiting for Hachiko
Picture of Sunset_Va
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The NASA tracking site has not started the
Heat and Cold Temperatures numbers yet.

The site did say it would take 2-3 days for those instruments to start measuring Temperatures.


美しい犬
 
Posts: 6617 | Location: Near the Metropolis of Tightsqueeze, Va | Registered: February 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Waiting for Hachiko
Picture of Sunset_Va
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Temperatures are now working on the NASA JWST tracking site.

-244⁰ F on the cold side.


美しい犬
 
Posts: 6617 | Location: Near the Metropolis of Tightsqueeze, Va | Registered: February 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of mdblanton
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Interesting interview from Smarter Everyday with the senior scientist over JWST: JWST - Smarter Everyday
 
Posts: 904 | Location: Petal, MS | Registered: January 21, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Political Cynic
Picture of nhtagmember
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Quickie update

It unfurled and deployed successfully

It’s 80% of the way to its final location

So far so good
 
Posts: 52153 | Location: Tucson Arizona | Registered: January 16, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Baroque Bloke
Picture of Pipe Smoker
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^^^^^^^^^^
“NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope team fully deployed its 21-foot, gold-coated primary mirror, successfully completing the final stage of all major spacecraft deployments to prepare for science operations.”

More info in this link:
https://www.nasa.gov/press-rel...ne-as-mirror-unfolds



Serious about crackers.
 
Posts: 7071 | Location: San Diego | Registered: July 26, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
SIGforum Official
Eye Doc
Picture of bcereuss
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Is there a site to see current *and* historical telemetry data? I’ve tried (not super-hard) but can’t find a site that shows this. (And yes, I know about Where is Webb?)

I’m trying to see a history of speed, position, altitude, attitude, temp, etc.
 
Posts: 2701 | Location: (Occupied) Northern Minnesota | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of steve495
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quote:
Originally posted by mdblanton:
Interesting interview from Smarter Everyday with the senior scientist over JWST: JWST - Smarter Everyday


This was a great.


Steve


Small Business Website Design & Maintenance - https://spidercreations.net | OpSpec Training - https://opspectraining.com | Grayguns - https://grayguns.com

Evil exists. You can not negotiate with, bribe or placate evil. You're not going to be able to have it sit down with Dr. Phil for an anger management session either.
 
Posts: 4866 | Location: Windsor Locks, Conn. | Registered: July 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Political Cynic
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It keeps chugging along. The major stuff going on now is testing the mirror actuators. I learned today that the entire mirror alignment and testing process is about 90 days.

Also interesting to see the temperature difference between the hot and cold sides.
 
Posts: 52153 | Location: Tucson Arizona | Registered: January 16, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Void Where Prohibited
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And it's going to take almost five months for the mirrors to cool to operating temperature.



"If Gun Control worked, Chicago would look like Mayberry, not Thunderdome" - Cam Edwards
 
Posts: 16040 | Location: Under the Boot of Tyranny in Connectistan | Registered: February 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
women dug his snuff
and his gallant stroll
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First images are coming back to Earth in preparation for mirror alignment.

Direct link

 
Posts: 10744 | Registered: August 12, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
SIGforum Official
Eye Doc
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JWST

(June 8th 2022 update)

Micrometeoroid strikes are an unavoidable aspect of operating any spacecraft, which routinely sustain many impacts over the course of long and productive science missions in space. Between May 23 and 25, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope sustained an impact to one of its primary mirror segments. After initial assessments, the team found the telescope is still performing at a level that exceeds all mission requirements despite a marginally detectable effect in the data. Thorough analysis and measurements are ongoing. Impacts will continue to occur throughout the entirety of Webb’s lifetime in space; such events were anticipated when building and testing the mirror on the ground. After a successful launch, deployment, and telescope alignment, Webb’s beginning-of-life performance is still well above expectations, and the observatory is fully capable of performing the science it was designed to achieve.

Webb’s mirror was engineered to withstand bombardment from the micrometeoroid environment at its orbit around Sun-Earth L2 of dust-sized particles flying at extreme velocities. While the telescope was being built, engineers used a mixture of simulations and actual test impacts on mirror samples to get a clearer idea of how to fortify the observatory for operation in orbit. This most recent impact was larger than was modeled, and beyond what the team could have tested on the ground.

“We always knew that Webb would have to weather the space environment, which includes harsh ultraviolet light and charged particles from the Sun, cosmic rays from exotic sources in the galaxy, and occasional strikes by micrometeoroids within our solar system,” said Paul Geithner, technical deputy project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “We designed and built Webb with performance margin – optical, thermal, electrical, mechanical – to ensure it can perform its ambitious science mission even after many years in space.” For example, due to careful work by the launch site teams, Webb’s optics were kept cleaner than required while on the ground; their pristine cleanliness improves the overall reflectivity and throughput, thereby improving total sensitivity. This and other performance margins make Webb’s science capabilities robust to potential degradations over time.

Furthermore, Webb’s capability to sense and adjust mirror positions enables partial correction for the result of impacts. By adjusting the position of the affected segment, engineers can cancel out a portion of the distortion. This minimizes the effect of any impact, although not all of the degradation can be cancelled out this way. Engineers have already performed a first such adjustment for the recently affected segment C3, and additional planned mirror adjustments will continue to fine tune this correction. These steps will be repeated when needed in response to future events as part of the monitoring and maintenance of the telescope throughout the mission.

To protect Webb in orbit, flight teams can use protective maneuvers that intentionally turn the optics away from known meteor showers before they are set to occur. This most recent hit was not a result of a meteor shower and is currently considered an unavoidable chance event. As a result of this impact, a specialized team of engineers has been formed to look at ways to mitigate the effects of further micrometeoroid hits of this scale. Over time, the team will collect invaluable data and work with micrometeoroid prediction experts at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center to be able to better predict how performance may change, bearing in mind that the telescope’s initial performance is better than expected. Webb’s tremendous size and sensitivity make it a highly sensitive detector of micrometeorites; over time Webb will help improve knowledge of the solar system dust particle environment at L2, for this and future missions.

“With Webb’s mirrors exposed to space, we expected that occasional micrometeoroid impacts would gracefully degrade telescope performance over time,” said Lee Feinberg, Webb optical telescope element manager at NASA Goddard. “Since launch, we have had four smaller measurable micrometeoroid strikes that were consistent with expectations and this one more recently that is larger than our degradation predictions assumed. We will use this flight data to update our analysis of performance over time and also develop operational approaches to assure we maximize the imaging performance of Webb to the best extent possible for many years to come.”

This recent impact caused no change to Webb’s operations schedule, as the team continues to check out the science instruments’ observing modes and prepares for the release of Webb’s first images and the start of science operations.
 
Posts: 2701 | Location: (Occupied) Northern Minnesota | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fire begets Fire
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I was dubiously skeptical about that that origami unfolding, but I got to say I’m stoked about the science yet to come! Big Grin





"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine under which a man accepts the benefits of the social group without being willing to pay - and claims a halo for his dishonesty."
~Robert A. Heinlein
 
Posts: 25492 | Location: dughouse | Registered: February 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
A Grateful American
Picture of sigmonkey
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They better get the "family portrait shots" as soon as everything is ready, cuz, the sitting can go bad really, really fast.




"the meaning of life, is to give life meaning" I could explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
 
Posts: 43185 | Location: ...thrice divorced, living in a van, DOWN BY THE RIVER!!! | Registered: December 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Only the government can take FIVE YEARS to decide what to take pictures of first.

How many meetings and how much was everyone paid for 5 years of meeting to make that decision.

Talk about bloat.

..Deciding what Webb should look at first has been a project more than five years in the making, undertaken by an international partnership between NASA, ESA, CSA, and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)...
 
Posts: 4212 | Registered: February 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
thin skin can't win
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quote:
Originally posted by sig2392:
Only the government can take FIVE YEARS to decide what to take pictures of first..


I’m pretty sure they’ve got a lengthy program already laid out, it’s the FIRST that is getting so much attention and being possibly debated or at least promoted as such. Presumably due to the historical significance.

That’s not bloat, that’s production value. May seem silly but in the environment of scrapping for support and funds it’s understandable.



You only have integrity once. - imprezaguy02

 
Posts: 11519 | Location: Madison, MS | Registered: December 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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