SIGforum.com    Main Page  Hop To Forum Categories  The Lounge    How does one get a job these days?
Page 1 2 3 4 

Moderators: Chris Orndorff, LDD
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
How does one get a job these days? Login/Join 
Get my pies
outta the oven!

Picture of PASig
posted Hide Post
Have you thought about applying for a job with a defense contractor? We are beginning to see a LOT of retirements and it’s opening up all kinds of job opportunities. Email me if you want to talk further. They love hiring guys like you with a clearance and military background.


 
Posts: 28037 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
אַרְיֵה
Picture of V-Tail
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by BadDogPSD:

Looking to leave my current employer . . . Looking at going into business for myself.
That is the right idea!

Why work for The Man, when you can be The Man?



הרחפת שלי מלאה בצלופחים
 
Posts: 25264 | Location: Central Florida, Orlando area | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
What type of HR/business roles are you applying for? Unfortunately, an MBA without the accompanying business experience is essentially applying for the same roles as a recent undergrad. I don’t disagree that the army provided you with far more valuable skills than some Ivy League school, unfortunately the typical person in a business environment isn’t going to know what that means. Or how it converts into business interactions. Same with building homes. Throw in some age discrimination based on years of service and you’re struggling to get past the screening for HR Generalist/Admin roles…

The items you list, Ie don’t do drugs, clean record, can read’ are also not skills, bluntly, they’re quite literally not even questioned it’s so obvious based on your resume. Show what you did with your MBA or certificate. Give your army roles that used these tools to accomplish something in terms of a civilian role. Leave off military jargon.

Network. Interview potential recruiters to sell you, reach out to a handful that specialize in your industry or function and make it known you’re actively looking (they want fast commissions). Look for temp to hire roles, contract roles, and come in at the lowest level and bust your ass to prove you’re not entry level. Take all tasks, look for anything that’ll get you in front of higher ups, be the first in/last out. Be active on industry topics and news on LinkedIn groups, write an article or blog and get it circulating.

PS: The September date is less of an issue with how slow the cogs turn in the hiring processes these days. That also wouldn’t be flushed out until interview/offer stage which I would delay disclosing.
 
Posts: 491 | Location: Michigan | Registered: May 18, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oh stewardess,
I speak jive.
Picture of 46and2
posted Hide Post
Personal Networking, mostly.

Plus, like Rogue mentioned, relentlessly re-adapting your Resume for each and every job/role you apply for, as though you and your experiences were nearly born to do it, nearly word for word, a brutal process that I detest but it works and is essentially required.

Also, you're all hat and no cattle, experience wise, and your MBA is much like a newly commissioned set of butter bars in the business world... you know precisely enough to be dangerous, but rarely helpful.

Get in the door somewhere, then head down a while, and a two jobs from now you'll be pretty awesome...
 
Posts: 25013 | Registered: March 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of jbcummings
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Edmond:

-13 years commissioned service in the Army
-secret clearance
-MBA
-master's in human resources
-certificate in business analytics from Wharton

What am I doing wrong?


Reading your post, I get you are educated. You can be taught to do something. What I don’t see is experience. What have you done (and lately) that can give you relevance to a prospective job. As I was retiring, one of the last interviews I did was after having to “sit out” of my work discipline for 10 months taking care of my mother before she died. I was told that the 10 months (I.T. Environment) would make it hard to overcome with my age. Employers ar3 looking for relevant experience that’s recent. They really only care about the education if it fills a check box for some reason. You’ll need to highlight relevant experience.


———-
Do not meddle in the affairs of wizards, for thou art crunchy and taste good with catsup.
 
Posts: 4132 | Location: DFW | Registered: May 21, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Slayer of Agapanthus


posted Hide Post
As a veteran you get bonus points, well really a multiplier, for government jobs. The IRS will be hiring. You can help with human capital projections and such.


"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye". The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupery, pilot and author, lost on mission, July 1944, Med Theatre.
 
Posts: 5515 | Location: Central Texas | Registered: September 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Don't Panic
Picture of joel9507
posted Hide Post
Talk with your MBA school's alumni office. They probably have staff that can go over your resume, point you in the direction of known recruiter/headhunters prominent in the locale you want to work and in the industry/industries you're targeting, that kind of thing.
 
Posts: 13932 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: October 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Rick Lee
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
Are you tailoring your resume and cover letter for each individual job description?

Lots of jobs these days rely on automated software to sift through applications and resumes. They program it to look for certain key words based on the requirements of the position, pick out ones that contain those words to get further human review, and discard the rest.

So it could be that if you're just reusing the same resume for each application, your resume simply doesn't contain the right buzzwords for that specific opening, and is therefore being kicked out before a real human being even lays eyes on it.


Beat me to it. THIS. Unless it's a small org. where you can directly contact the decision maker, you need the right keywords in your CV. Most big orgs have software that will parse your CV long before it gets in front of a live person's eyes. I've referred very well qualified people for a job before and they never got called. This is why.
 
Posts: 2291 | Location: Cave Creek, AZ | Registered: October 24, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Not enough to go on in your original post but you might look at 'Cleared Technology Careers' at Microsoft. Once you get to that website, you can drill just slightly and HR is one of the area's they are interested in. MS moves slow enough that September shouldn't be an issue.
 
Posts: 804 | Location: Federal Way, WA (It's a city not prison) | Registered: September 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I have a very particular
set of skills
posted Hide Post
I'm no HR guy, but LinkedIn seems to be the new 'Indeed' these days. You can post your status 'Looking for work' etc. in your profile...it also lets you put up a pretty detailed profile showing experience, etc. It's worth putting some time into.

ZipRecruiter has a lot of commercials as well.

I'd say networking is at least as important and productive as filling out job applications 'cold.' Tap into your military circle, local 'veterans business breakfasts', etc. and look for recruiters that specialize in transitioning military to civilian roles. Don't be bashful about job seeking and asking folks to keep you in mind for any opportunities where you might be a good fit. Perhaps volunteer some time with a local outfit on something? Gives you a chance to interact with folks and let them get to know you a bit, and see your capabilities...

This one does work in maritime as well other areas...might not be the perfect fit, but gives you the idea:

https://www.coregroupresources.com/

It can be disheartening sending out application after application after application and just have it turn into cyber-vapor in the vacuum of the internet. Been there, done that.

Keep your head up, think outside the box...your next opportunity will probably come in a form you don't expect.

Good luck!
Boss


A real life Sisyphus...
"It's not the critic who counts..." TR
Exodus 23.2: Do not follow the crowd in doing wrong...
Despite some people's claims to the contrary, 5 lbs. is actually different than 12 lbs.
It's never simple/easy.
 
Posts: 4965 | Location: In the arena... | Registered: December 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Be not wise in
thine own eyes
Picture of kimber1911
posted Hide Post
Cover letter is to get them to read your resume.

Cover letter should show that you know about the company, and that you are interested in working for them.
Resume can be a bit more generic.

When I was looking I had a unique cover letter for each company I was applying to work for.
I also had two types of resume as I was applying for two distinct industries.



“We’re in a situation where we have put together, and you guys did it for our administration…President Obama’s administration before this. We have put together, I think, the most extensive and inclusive voter fraud organization in the history of American politics,”
Pres. Select, Joe Biden
 
Posts: 4531 | Location: Charlotte Area, NC | Registered: December 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by rsbolo:
You biggest issue might be the lag time. Companies are hiring for this minute. I'll bet when September approaches you'll get calls.

Not what you want to hear, I know.


I agree that this might be your biggest hurdle. The closer you get to September, the more likely you will get calls. Good luck!




"I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them." Thomas Jefferson


"All that is necessary for evil to triumph is that good men have insurance." JALLEN
 
Posts: 888 | Location: PDX | Registered: December 28, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
You're active duty now...
the military has a program to help find jobs for personnel who is transitioning back to civilian life.




 
Posts: 9164 | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
St. Vitus
Dance Instructor
Picture of blueye
posted Hide Post
Seems the cutoff age is 50 unless you know someone that can help you get in.
 
Posts: 4944 | Location: basement | Registered: April 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of sourdough44
posted Hide Post
I’d try to get into an area you want to work in, even if you have to start entry or mid, then move up.

I always liked to cast a wide net, lived in a handful of States with military then various jobs. Yes, there are places I wouldn’t want to live, but plenty I could make work.

It’s always best to look for a job, while you have a job. No need for months unemployed waiting for the ‘right job’.

Depending on age & field, the Reserves or Guard on the way out may be an option for you.
 
Posts: 4852 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
Are you tailoring your resume and cover letter for each individual job description?

Lots of jobs these days rely on automated software to sift through applications and resumes. They program it to look for certain key words based on the requirements of the position, pick out ones that contain those words to get further human review, and discard the rest.

So it could be that if you're just reusing the same resume for each application, your resume simply doesn't contain the right buzzwords for that specific opening, and is therefore being kicked out before a real human being even lays eyes on it.


THIS. Every single resume and cover letter needs to be targeted to each job and you need to work in all or MOST of the technical buzzwords in the job description/advertisement. Otherwise you run a high risk of your resume getting screened out by a program and not having human eyes look at it.

I am so fortunate to have recently landed a federal job with the U.S. EPA as a technical writer-editor. I'm an environmental scientist by education and training. Like the Olympics/elections, I got laid off in 2012, 2016, and 2020 (well, technically Jan 2021), ages 45, 49, and 53. So I had to face increasing age discrimination too.

I missed out on a HUGE opportunity in my former field of water science with a major utility that would have been a big raise with amazing benefits (and stress). Because I busted my butt preparing for the interview but did NOT prepare for behavioral interview questions. That's all they asked, 10 in a row with sub-parts. When the video interview was over I said out loud, "well, I did not get that job" (and I still almost did so good was my skillset and resume).

So when my highly tailored resume and cover letter got me an interview at USEPA, I had 20 pages of prepared responses for major categories of behavioral interview questions. I prepped with my brother, a career Fed, who threw me super tricky, multi-part interview questions, one after another. I was READY for that interview and interviewers, and that's after spending 12+ hours scouring USEPA's website for my division/Office and related recent news articles. I also had a list of "softball" to HARD questions for the interviewers prepared and a 30-second closing pitch summary. My brother INSISTED I have one prepared and convincingly prepared/practiced as my closing. Seemed kind of redundant, but I agree with him now.

I wanted to NAIL the interview so their decision would be easy. Got the job, slight raise over my previous job, and after a year, pretty much guaranteed job security and awesome benefits. Do the prep work. Like actually painting a room, the PREP work is much more difficult then the interview itself if you are fully prepared.

Most of all, keep the chin up with your head down looking and preparing for opportunities. Best of luck!
 
Posts: 3166 | Location: Alexandria, VA | Registered: March 07, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I am 50+, in a technology field, with a BA, not an MBA like you. I got cut from my job of 18 years last year. I worked with an outplacement agency, which really was a wasted benefit.

I got a job, but it was not a simple process like it was in the past. It took interviews over months to get in. There was an open req, but the company moved very slowly to get me in.

The one benefit I did see from the outplacement company was with resume building. On most sites, your resume is filtered/screened using keywords and even AI before it is viewed by the hiring company.

In the end, my LinkedIn network was how I got my new job, and I was able to do it without missing a paycheck (severance was over 4 months, and I basically had 2 months off).

Good luck, and be sure to use your connections from your MBA and your military service (thanks for serving btw).


There is something good and motherly about Washington, the grand old benevolent National Asylum for the helpless.
- Mark Twain The Gilded Age

#CNNblackmail #CNNmemewar
 
Posts: 644 | Location: Seacoast in USA | Registered: September 24, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
If you are open to a Federal job and can pass a PFT, I would apply for 1811 series positions. Starting pay is good and benefits are better.

If Federal law enforcement is not your cup of tea, Internal Revenue Service is hiring Revenue Officer positions right now in the Small Business/Self Employed division. The OPM job series is 1169. With an MBA, you'd start out as a GS-9, but get an automatic promotion after a year. The Revenue Officer position is tough, although you do get to learn about businesses and help taxpayers stay on track.

Because you are a veteran, you could also look at the Veterans Benefits Administration as a VSR (good job), and Veterans Health Administration as a Contract Analyst or a Management Analyst.

An additional thought is that some businesses have veteran transition programs and positions designed for career military folks.

https://veteranjobsmission.com/veteran-resources

Shoot me an email if you have any questions or would like to discuss privately.
 
Posts: 453 | Location: FL | Registered: July 30, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Perception
posted Hide Post
Have you had a few people you know and trust read and critique your resume? One should be knowledgeable about the field you are trying to get into, and another should be the meanest grammar nazi you've ever run into.

I read hundreds of resumes every year (I probably average 10 minutes on each one, not 6-7 seconds) and a LARGE MAJORITY of them come with huge grammar or formatting issues. This is a huge red flag when many of the positions I review for have at least some written communication component. The errors I see are huge, and would be totally preventable if they had someone look at their resume before they sent it in.

Another issue I see all the time is a failure to clearly communicate what the applicant actually does in the positions listed on their resume. They will have very generic descriptors (ran reports, analyzed data, created budget, supervised team of employees, etc.) Without a little more info on what each of those entails, I can't tell if the experience was quality experience even if it is relevant. It's even worse if I can tell they straight up copy/ pasted from their position description or even the job listing.

If cover letters are required make sure you give them the same proofreading treatment. The letters I see typically do the applicant more harm than good. It's another chance for them to tell me they can't communicate clearly and don't care enough to fix even the simplest of errors. I can also often see that the applicant is spamming their resume out to anyone who will read it without even looking at what it is we actually do. If I've got 400 two-sided pages of resumes sitting in front of me to review and I'm irritated with yours by the end of the cover letter it's not going to be helpful to your chances.

I don't know if any of this applies to your resume, but I've seen some people I know personally are well qualified complain they can't get an interview. Then it's immediately apparent why when I see their resume.




"The people hate the lizards and the lizards rule the people."
"Odd," said Arthur, "I thought you said it was a democracy."
"I did," said Ford, "it is."
"So," said Arthur, hoping he wasn't sounding ridiculously obtuse, "why don't the people get rid of the lizards?"
"It honestly doesn't occur to them. They've all got the vote, so they all pretty much assume that the government they've voted in more or less approximates the government they want."
"You mean they actually vote for the lizards."
"Oh yes," said Ford with a shrug, "of course."
"But," said Arthur, going for the big one again, "why?"
"Because if they didn't vote for a lizard, then the wrong lizard might get in."
 
Posts: 2966 | Location: Two blocks from the Center of the Universe | Registered: December 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Don't Panic
Picture of joel9507
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Perception:
Have you had a few people you know and trust read and critique your resume? One should be knowledgeable about the field you are trying to get into, and another should be the meanest grammar nazi you've ever run into.

I read hundreds of resumes every year (I probably average 10 minutes on each one, not 6-7 seconds) and a LARGE MAJORITY of them come with huge grammar or formatting issues. This is a huge red flag when many of the positions I review for have at least some written communication component. The errors I see are huge, and would be totally preventable if they had someone look at their resume before they sent it in.

^^ Abso-freakin-lutely!

If someone cannot use the language correctly in a document known to be looked at closely and designed to be read by decision-makers in yea/nay positions about their future careers (i.e. the resume) then it's reasonable to assume they would be even more sloppy in their day-to-day work.

Anyone can make a typo/mento, which is why the intelligent job seeker has others review and criticize their resumes before sending them along.

For glaring errors to make it into submitted resumes, those errors have to be a) created and b)not caught by self-editing and c) not caught by external review. Their presence in a submitted resume speaks volumes about the candidate, their command of English, and their thought process....none of which is positive.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: joel9507,
 
Posts: 13932 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: October 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2 3 4  
 

SIGforum.com    Main Page  Hop To Forum Categories  The Lounge    How does one get a job these days?

© SIGforum 2021