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Optimistic Cynic
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I have a section of tree trunk that I'd like to turn into a walking stick, and learn/practice some carving skill on. It is about 58" long and about 2" diameter at the handle end tapering to about half that at the tip. I think it is a trunk from an American Dogwood. Several large cracks, running longitudinally, developed during the drying process. I'd like to fill these with something that would harden and add to the looks of the wood. I intend to sand the entire stick before proceeding to carving, the filler would be injected before sanding.

I'm thinking I'd like the looks of an amber/resin-type product rather than anything like the so-called "wood filler" putty-like products intended to repair scratches in furniture.

I'm thinking an epoxy might give satisfactory results, or maybe even something like hot glue. Anybody have any hints for me?
 
Posts: 5139 | Location: NoVA | Registered: July 22, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Something like a Milliput epoxy putty?


--
I always prefer reality when I can figure out what it is.
JALLEN 10/18/18
 
Posts: 2234 | Location: Roswell, GA | Registered: March 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If it cracked during drying, it will keep cracking unless you use something to stabilize the weakened areas. Wood filler & hot glue are a waste of time.
Epoxy is about the only thing I'd use. You want something thin enough & with a long work time to soak in.
It will be messy & a pain in the ass - multiple applications with long cure times. It will likely not carve well - sand or turn on a lathe maybe, but I bet it will be too hard to carve nicely.
 
Posts: 3110 | Location: IN | Registered: January 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fire begets Fire
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quote:
Originally posted by snidera:
If it cracked during drying, it will keep cracking unless you use something to stabilize the weakened areas. Wood filler & hot glue are a waste of time.
Epoxy is about the only thing I'd use. You want something thin enough & with a long work time to soak in.
It will be messy & a pain in the ass - multiple applications with long cure times. It will likely not carve well - sand or turn on a lathe maybe, but I bet it will be too hard to carve nicely.


And likely a vacuum chamber to pull the bubbles out.

My woodworking is small… Knife handles… But I’ve bought stabilized wood and I know how they do it.

If it were me I’d look for a better stick of wood… But if you’ve got your heart set on it, have at it. Smile

I see colored epoxy projects in wood on YouTube all the time.





"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine under which a man accepts the benefits of the social group without being willing to pay - and claims a halo for his dishonesty."
~Robert A. Heinlein
 
Posts: 25485 | Location: dughouse | Registered: February 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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West Systems Epoxy



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Posts: 852 | Location: SE Michigan | Registered: April 11, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A good quality superglue. Medium thin. Dust in some brass dust from a belt sander. Let it cure. Then add more + more dust. Cure. Repeat.
The glue will be strong enough, the metal will give color and strength.
 
Posts: 1976 | Location: south central Pennsylvania | Registered: November 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I’d try the CA (super) glue or west system epoxy. You can sand and mix in the sawdust for color or tint the epoxy if you want. If you use epoxy you can use silicone caulk to build a dam around the crack before pouring it in. A small suction cup works well to force the glue in. I’d try one of those before getting another stick - you’ll learn something even if it doesn’t work.
 
Posts: 816 | Location: Tampa | Registered: July 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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JB Weld, after sanding it will take an alcohol based stain like Fiebing's brown leather dye. I've mixed brown with a little bit of red to make a nice reddish brown colored dye.
 
Posts: 242 | Location: Weatherford, TX | Registered: April 27, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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