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Experienced Slacker
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Everything can be, and has been, manipulated at one point or another.

IMO big name energy stocks with dividends are the best bets, especially when all is looking dreary. You could always go with ETFs that focus on necessities, but that can be frustrating watching yourself pay the fees on meager (if any) gains.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: apprentice,
 
Posts: 7023 | Registered: May 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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quote:
Originally posted by mrvmax:
In the long run the market will recover, the problem is that not every will be here in the long run. I suggested before and will suggest again - look into uranium ETF's and stocks. They have the potential to still make great gains, even through this cesspool of an economy.


This looks like a good bet. A simple search of the top 3 uranium ETFs, then checking their 1 year returns, shows they performed far better than the market.
 
Posts: 763 | Location: FL | Registered: January 29, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Green grass and
high tides
Picture of old rugged cross
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quote:
Originally posted by odin:
I'm in my 70s and still working full time. My company has a 401K which is hemorrhaging daily. I only have 10 years into it and may just roll the thing over to my IRA. My IRA is VERY conservative and has not been losing value to date. I'd like to retire, but with the economy the way it is, I'm leery! Guess I'll keep working till I'm 80!!!


Odin, care to share how your "Very conservative" IRA portfolio is configured to not loose any value in this market. Many would like to know.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: old rugged cross,



"Practice like you want to play in the game"
 
Posts: 17594 | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by old rugged cross:
quote:
Originally posted by odin:
I'm in my 70s and still working full time. My company has a 401K which is hemorrhaging daily. I only have 10 years into it and may just roll the thing over to my IRA. My IRA is VERY conservative and has not been losing value to date. I'd like to retire, but with the economy the way it is, I'm leery! Guess I'll keep working till I'm 80!!!


Odin, care to share how your "Very conservative" portfolio is configured to not loose any value in this market. Many would like to know.
Probably CD's for starters.
 
Posts: 3168 | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Cash or I bonds.
 
Posts: 13957 | Location: Stuck at home | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Victim of Life's
Circumstances
Picture of doublesharp
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Contrarian here. Every post in this thread is worrisome - when every human mortal thinks market is going one way a contrarian goes the other.

Walgreens, as a dividend aristocrat, is paying over 5.5% div, that aint right, WBA is a 2-3% div stock and when div gets back in line you have a share gain. 52 wk low @ $35

World runs on chips. Intel is @ 52 wk low and paying near 5% div. tradition say 2-3%

Altria (Phillip Morris tobacco MO) @ 52 wk low and paying 9% div. Sin stocks survive hard times.

Gamblers should look at CRON, Cronos Growth, a cannabis play that Altria (MO) has invested 1.8 billion $$$. Buy for $3 today. Don't invest money you aren't prepared to lose - big risk = big reward

https://finance.yahoo.com/news...ordan-154952154.html
FTA:
“We’ve never been closer to getting real cannabis legislation, this could be something that breaks the glass ceiling for the industry,” Jordan said at the Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference on Wednesday.

Big picture

When marijuana gets rescheduled, Jordan said that big tobacco companies like Philip Morris International Inc (NYSE: PM) and Altria Group Inc (NYSE: MO) will be known as cannabis companies...


________________________
God spelled backwards is dog
 
Posts: 4061 | Location: Sunnyside of Louisville | Registered: July 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Optimistic Cynic
Picture of architect
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If you are a boomer, in or near retirement, and depending on your savings/social security/pension/etc. realize that to a large part it is the contributions of the millenials that will fund these monetary streams. Guess what? There are a lot fewer of them than are needed to keep up. So what happens when you spend more than you make? Eventually you go broke. The US is very lucky in that there is a relatively large cohort of earners (the millenials' kids) that might be able to pull the chestnuts out of the fire before we all starve, but it looks to be a near thing.

I am not smart enough to forecast how this reality might translate to investment opportunities. I'll give props to those in this forum who are bold enough to gamble their fortunes to uncertain prospects. Best of luck to you.
 
Posts: 5272 | Location: NoVA | Registered: July 22, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was talking to my financial advisor on this. He said that on his side for the last 8 years or so it we have seen very large yearly growths. What they are expecting in the next few years is normal average growth of 6-8%. God Bless Smile


"Always legally conceal carry. At the right place and time, one person can make a positive difference."
 
Posts: 2808 | Location: Sector 001 | Registered: October 30, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by architect:
If you are a boomer, in or near retirement, and depending on your savings/social security/pension/etc. realize that to a large part it is the contributions of the millenials that will fund these monetary streams. Guess what? There are a lot fewer of them than are needed to keep up. So what happens when you spend more than you make? Eventually you go broke. The US is very lucky in that there is a relatively large cohort of earners (the millenials' kids) that might be able to pull the chestnuts out of the fire before we all starve, but it looks to be a near thing.

I think you are confusing GenX and Millennials. The Millennial Generation is larger than the Boomer. GenZ are the kids of GenX and both are smaller than the other two. There will be plenty of Xers, Millennials and Zers working to pay for the retirement of Boomers until the last one is dead. GenX are the ones who will be most likely screwed by shortfalls in SS.

https://www.statista.com/stati...ation-by-generation/
 
Posts: 2271 | Location: WI | Registered: December 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by doublesharp:
Contrarian here. Every post in this thread is worrisome - when every human mortal thinks market is going one way a contrarian goes the other.
.....
World runs on chips. Intel is @ 52 wk low and paying near 5% div. tradition say 2-3%



I agree. The sentiment is so overwhelmingly negative lately. I always sell when the market is reaching new highs and buy when Debbie Downer runs wild - like right now.

I am 68 and retired. I could (barely) survive on my pension and social security, so my IRAs are for luxuries like new cars, new roof, new windows, new air conditioner, horses and inflation.

I am a Benjamin Graham investor. I read his book in 1972. Buy good stocks at a reasonable price. While I am not a market timer I am not a buy and hold investor. Like the man said, you got to know when to hold them and know when to fold them.

I held Intel INTC for years. Then last year INTC went to $68 and that's too much, so I sold. Now I can buy it back at less than half price. Back up the truck, son. (No more than 5% in any single company)

At the beginning of the year I was 35% in stocks, now 65% in stocks.

The market will go up and down. Individual stocks will go up and down. Buy low, sell high. That's all there is to it.

There still bargains to be had.


----------------------------------------------------
Dances with Crabgrass
 
Posts: 2102 | Location: East Virginia | Registered: October 12, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fire begets Fire
Picture of SIGnified
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quote:
Originally posted by Flash-LB:
If you've purchased good stocks, you don't have a thing to worry about.

If you purchased lousy ones, then perhaps you should worry.


OK sure… lol pure circular logic there. No way to argue that one. Big Grin

(I guess you never heard of Lehman Brothers?)





"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine under which a man accepts the benefits of the social group without being willing to pay - and claims a halo for his dishonesty."
~Robert A. Heinlein
 
Posts: 25877 | Location: dughouse | Registered: February 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
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quote:
Originally posted by SIGnified:
quote:
Originally posted by Flash-LB:
If you've purchased good stocks, you don't have a thing to worry about.

If you purchased lousy ones, then perhaps you should worry.


OK sure… lol pure circular logic there. No way to argue that one. Big Grin

(I guess you never heard of Lehman Brothers?)


Not circular at all.

A pure if-then equation. It's one of the most used equations in Excel and also in most of the programming I did for a living.

Circular logic would put you in an endless loop with reset being the only way out.
 
Posts: 9665 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fire begets Fire
Picture of SIGnified
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No - it’s your assumption about the word “good”… lmao Razz





"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine under which a man accepts the benefits of the social group without being willing to pay - and claims a halo for his dishonesty."
~Robert A. Heinlein
 
Posts: 25877 | Location: dughouse | Registered: February 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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quote:
I guess you never heard of Lehman Brothers?

^^^^^^^^^^^
Yeah. Didn't they star in Slapshot alongside Paul Newman?
 
Posts: 13957 | Location: Stuck at home | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fire begets Fire
Picture of SIGnified
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quote:
Originally posted by ZSMICHAEL:
quote:
I guess you never heard of Lehman Brothers?

^^^^^^^^^^^
Yeah. Didn't they star in Slapshot alongside Paul Newman?


Hansons… The Hansons brothers … [dopeslap] Smile





"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine under which a man accepts the benefits of the social group without being willing to pay - and claims a halo for his dishonesty."
~Robert A. Heinlein
 
Posts: 25877 | Location: dughouse | Registered: February 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That was a joke. Glad to see you saw the film. I know one of the cast members. He said it was fun making the film. He now is the head coach of the Canucks.
 
Posts: 13957 | Location: Stuck at home | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Green grass and
high tides
Picture of old rugged cross
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A lot of us are IRA, tax sheltered (at the moment) retirement investors. And do not invest in individual stocks.

Bond funds have not really countered stock fund loss' as many have hoped. They usually do a better job.

I really get the feeling that as many have alluded to in previous threads. Market manipulation is designed to suck the wealth from the retirement age folks and a way to enrich the powerful.

I just do not see the times we are in as " the market will go up and it will go down" in a traditional historical sense. Sure it will along the way as it sucks peoples retirement into their pockets.



Just how I see it.



"Practice like you want to play in the game"
 
Posts: 17594 | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posting without pants
Picture of KevinCW
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Depends on where you are in life.

The older folks, those using their investments to live on right now, and making withdrawals to exist are going to get screwed. They have to sell their stocks when they are down.

THose that are younger, and still putting money IN to the markets, have an opportunity.

Unless you are a doomsday preacher, and believe this is the end of the world as we know it, then you have an opportunity.

Everyone in THAT boat, should be either buying or keeping their powder dry to start buying.

The SnP 500 and the Nasdaq have gotten creamed, and some bargains can be found.

Me personally, I'm putting some money (a small amount, all I can afford right now) into large, stable companies, preferably that pay a dividend I can set to reinvest.

I'm talking "too big to fail" type companies, like Walmart, Amazon, Intel, Google, Nvidia, Coca-cola, etc.

Large companies that aren't in any danger of going under, and that will weather the storm and after the recession hits us, will go back up.

As I said, as with any economic downturn, the real people who get screwed are those who HAVE to withdraw their money, like the retired folks.

Kevin





Strive to live your life so when you wake up in the morning and your feet hit the floor, the devil says "Oh crap, he's up."
 
Posts: 33173 | Location: St. Louis MO | Registered: February 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of grumpy1
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At 71 I am 20 percent in stocks and the rest in Money Markey and Stable Value funds. At least those are paying 2.25 percent and will soon probably be 3.0 percent. Not much but for years they have ben almost zero.

At some point I may up stock percentage but not yet as I feel downside could be substantial and long lasting.

My main concern is high inflation which we have not dealt with in 40 years. Interestingly back then the Fed had to raise interest rates to double digits where now they have gone to low single digits trying to fight inflation. However compared to 40 years ago the national debt in staggering high, 30 trillion plus and rapidly risng Eek Eek , which puts the Fed in a real quandry about raising rates because of the staggering amount it would increase payment on the debt. The same debt that so many said "was not a problem" until recently.

Energy costs seem to be the main driver of inflation but there does not seem to be much chance of that changing with those bent on getting everyone off of fossil fuels including the current administration don't seem to care and apparently does not affect them with their wealth. Another cold winter will be devastating to most of Europeans again I have been reading with energy costs still rising there.


“When the people find that they can vote themselves money that will herald the end of the republic.”
― Benjamin Franklin
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money."
― Margaret Thatcher
 
Posts: 9469 | Location: Northern Illinois | Registered: March 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
'm talking "too big to fail" type companies, like Walmart, Amazon, Intel, Google, Nvidia, Coca-cola, etc.

^^^^^^
Yeah like Kmart and Sears?? There is no company to big to fail.
 
Posts: 13957 | Location: Stuck at home | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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