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Nosce te ipsum
Picture of Woodman
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Snugging up the bonnet will squeeze the packing around the stem. That should eliminate your weeping. Full on, not a great valve position, pulls the stem assembly up into the packing, which further squeezes it. That is why a stem leak in half-on stops leaking at full-on.

The packing is a graphite rope or asbestos disc or some other goo-impregnated fiber pad. That valve is not too old, so disassembly is probably not required. I'd snug it up for now and think about new valves when you happen to have them. As others have noted, you hold back with one wrench while removing the valve with another wrench. A pair of 440's on the galvanized street elles with a pair of 430's on the valves will perform right smartly in your application.
 
Posts: 8494 | Location: Mid-Atlantic Region | Registered: March 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Thank you
Very little
Picture of HRK
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Why mess with snugging things up and shoving the problem out further, water leaks from washer dryers are one of the biggest problems.

Go to Home Desperate or Lowes get the new valves, and jmo prefer the tape, and replace them all, simple job, couple of plumbers wrenches, and replace the hoses if you haven't done it in a while.

Fix it, and be done with it.



 
Posts: 17566 | Registered: November 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
A day late, and
a dollar short
Picture of Warhorse
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quote:
Originally posted by mark123:
Yeah, I wasn’t thinking of cutting back to the copper and soldering on a ball valve but screwing one in sounds a lot simpler. Thanks everyone.

And of course I’ve found another valve that’s stuck closed. It’s for the back yard hose faucet. It feels spongy to turn but won’t move beyond about 1/16 turn. That’s definitely going to need soldered in. Looks like next Sunday is going to be busy.

In that case, make sure that wherever you buy plumbing supplies from is open on Sunday's...just saying. Smile


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Posts: 12959 | Location: Michigan | Registered: July 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I Deal In Lead
Picture of Flash-LB
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quote:
Originally posted by HRK:
Why mess with snugging things up and shoving the problem out further, water leaks from washer dryers are one of the biggest problems.

Go to Home Desperate or Lowes get the new valves, and jmo prefer the tape, and replace them all, simple job, couple of plumbers wrenches, and replace the hoses if you haven't done it in a while.

Fix it, and be done with it.


Friend of mine and a guy I shoot with Snowbirds between the San Tan Valley and Show Low Arizona.

He buttoned up the San Tan Valley House for the summer and went to Show Low. Two weeks later he got a phone call from his next door neighbor in the San Tan Valley. Water was leaking out from under his front door.

He'd had a problem with a leaking 3 year old Washing machine faucet and replaced it. While he was gone, the other faucet let go and unfortunately, he hadn't thought to turn off the water to the inside of his house like he normally did.

He'll never hear the last of it from his wife telling him when he replaced one faucet he should have replaced them both.
 
Posts: 6880 | Location: Gilbert Arizona | Registered: March 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Run Silent
Run Deep

Picture of Patriot
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quote:
Originally posted by mark123:
I could repack it but isn’t it better to replace it with a ball valve?



Either way is fine...I just thought you were hesitant to replacing the valves.

For me, packing is a 10 minute job.

You may not even need to replace packing. Sometimes you can add a small layer under the packing gland nut...as it may be "bottomed out" and can't compress the packing any further.

This is not the recommended way as I was always taught to replace the packing...but it works in a pinch if you just need to stop the leak...then fully replace/repair later.


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Posts: 6262 | Location: South East, Pa | Registered: July 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Run Silent
Run Deep

Picture of Patriot
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by HRK:
Why mess with snugging things up and shoving the problem out further, water leaks from washer dryers are one of the biggest problems.

Go to Home Desperate or Lowes get the new valves, and jmo prefer the tape, and replace them all, simple job, couple of plumbers wrenches, and replace the hoses if you haven't done it in a while.

Fix it, and be done with it.


Just an FYI...replacing packing IS fixing it...and its not "pushing" the problem...

Just saying...


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Pledge allegiance or pack your bag!
The problem with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money. - Margaret Thatcher
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Posts: 6262 | Location: South East, Pa | Registered: July 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If as others have suggested you can remove the stem and then get the screw that holds the washer loose then it can be fixed.... and if it can be fixed, that old old valve is far superior to just about any valve made today... but the key is if it will all come apart... and if not... then replacing it is the simplest solution ... assuming the thing will come off that old rusty galvanized pipe with out too much of a problem.

I'd turn off the water supply and see if the stem will come off easy first.
 
Posts: 2430 | Location: Greenville, SC | Registered: January 30, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Get my pies
outta the oven!

Picture of PASig
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You could do it yourself now for $25 if you have the know-how and tools. Me, I not screwing around with anything that can flood my house and cost thousands of $$$ in damage, paying the plumber $125 for the job to include parts and materials is well worth it to me.


 
Posts: 28042 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Run Silent
Run Deep

Picture of Patriot
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quote:
Originally posted by PASig:
You could do it yourself now for $25 if you have the know-how and tools. Me, I not screwing around with anything that can flood my house and cost thousands of $$$ in damage, paying the plumber $125 for the job to include parts and materials is well worth it to me.


Funny story about plumbers...

I wanted a water bib that was in my garage removed when I remodeled...the isolation was in my basement.

Now, I thought the same as you and had Moyer (a reputable company) come out to do it. I can braze/solder, but thought Id get a pro in.

Welp, guess what. He fucked it up, the cap leaked and caused mold damage in my basement. Walls torn out, mold remediation, etc etc

So there's that side of the "get a pro" coin...


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Pledge allegiance or pack your bag!
The problem with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money. - Margaret Thatcher
Spread my work ethic, not my wealth
 
Posts: 6262 | Location: South East, Pa | Registered: July 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by mark123:
Yeah, I wasn’t thinking of cutting back to the copper and soldering on a ball valve but screwing one in sounds a lot simpler. Thanks everyone.

And of course I’ve found another valve that’s stuck closed. It’s for the back yard hose faucet. It feels spongy to turn but won’t move beyond about 1/16 turn. That’s definitely going to need soldered in. Looks like next Sunday is going to be busy.


Your valves are threaded, just spray penetrating oil on it the day before, unscrew it and screw a new one on.
 
Posts: 20976 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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quote:
Originally posted by mark123:
I could repack it but isn’t it better to replace it with a ball valve?

I have both pipe dope and Teflon tape. Which is better for this sort of fitting or doesn’t it matter?


Replace the valves.

4 turns of Teflon and then Rectorseal #5 dope. Water gets both, gas gets #5 dope.




 
Posts: 9164 | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Nosce te ipsum
Picture of Woodman
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Last job I did we used the white dope with teflon and skipped the tape. Other times it has been thrice tape + dope. Truth be told, I'm not a fan of teflon tape, but it has saved my skin a few times.

On a 200' x 2" threaded steel job I ran many many moons ago, we unraveled lamp wick from its dozen strands to groups of three threads. White dope w/tef on the threads, then wind the lamp wick into the threads.

That sure was a lot of cutting and threading. Three 22" stone walls to chop through as well. No coring tools. And me, not even yet a master.
 
Posts: 8494 | Location: Mid-Atlantic Region | Registered: March 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
W07VH5
Picture of mark123
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I measured the threads with calipers. .822” that’s 1/2”, correct? So I get a 1/2” boiler drain? I think that’s what the chart says because there’s no point in matching actual dimensions. Razz
 
Posts: 42621 | Location: Pennsyltucky | Registered: December 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Run Silent
Run Deep

Picture of Patriot
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Yes,

Search

1/2" MNPT Brass Boiler Drain Valve, Lead Free

The m is for male pipe threads


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Pledge allegiance or pack your bag!
The problem with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money. - Margaret Thatcher
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Posts: 6262 | Location: South East, Pa | Registered: July 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, the links I posted on page one will do just fine.

BTW, plumbing is measured by the internal diameter, not the external. Wink
(Not saying all 1/2" materials measure 1/2", but they are close)




 
Posts: 9164 | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
W07VH5
Picture of mark123
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I replaced them this afternoon along with the crappy faucets in the kitchen and main bathroom sinks. No leaks so far. I know I should watch them for leaks over the next week but I’d rather just forget the whole ordeal. Razz
 
Posts: 42621 | Location: Pennsyltucky | Registered: December 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
W07VH5
Picture of mark123
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quote:
Originally posted by Excam_Man:
Yes, the links I posted on page one will do just fine.

BTW, plumbing is measured by the internal diameter, not the external. Wink
(Not saying all 1/2" materials measure 1/2", but they are close)
It’s all a bit esoteric though. Isn’t it? Big Grin
 
Posts: 42621 | Location: Pennsyltucky | Registered: December 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by mark123:
I replaced them this afternoon along with the crappy faucets in the kitchen and main bathroom sinks. No leaks so far. I know I should watch them for leaks over the next week but I’d rather just forget the whole ordeal. Razz


Good job. Just run your finger on the bottom of the valve once a day or so, if after 2 days it ain't leaking, it probably is good for a number of years. Next time something like this comes up, it won't be as "Scary" a job.
I've found that just getting started is the biggest hurdle in fixing things around the house.
 
Posts: 777 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: August 16, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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