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W07VH5
Picture of mark123
posted
We got the new washer delivered today and when I turned on the water, the one valve started leaking at the stem.


It gets better if you turn the valve a half turn clockwise. I tried tightening the nut down and it did get better but I don't want to go ape on it and mess it up. Do I have to replace the valve or can I just crank on it until it stops leaking or do I snap it off then back off a quarter turn?
 
Posts: 42621 | Location: Pennsyltucky | Registered: December 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
A Grateful American
Picture of sigmonkey
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Replace the stop.

It will never get better, only worse.

Trying to find any parts for that, as old as it is, will be futile.

I am the "while I am here..." type, and would replace all of them and be done with it.

Leaks are no fun, ask Noah, or all them people what was on that big cruise ship, back in 19 aught and 12.




"the meaning of life, is to give life meaning" I could explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
 
Posts: 41524 | Location: fl | Registered: December 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
Picture of RogueJSK
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Yep. Replace it.

Valves wear out over time, especially hot water ones, and especially on valves like laundry/sink shutoff valves that are rarely used. Sharp mineral deposits build up inside, and shred the internal rubber gaskets and seals when the valve is eventually operated.

(There are certain types of shutoff valves - like quarter-turn ball valves - that are less prone to internal damage from mineral deposits. Look at replacing it with one of those.)
 
Posts: 27503 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It looks like a small job that will turn into a major plumbing job very quickly.

As a quick fix if you can take the top off the valve without breaking it or the pipes it is attached to, graphite valve packing may fix the problem for a while.

The while is could be minutes or years.

It depends on the internal wear on the valve.

The stuff is less than $5 at most big box stores.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DA...king-80793/203193511

Replacing the stops and going to ball stops is a better idea.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/EASTM...utlet-Box/1002939342
 
Posts: 3918 | Registered: February 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
W07VH5
Picture of mark123
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Bah, why can you guys just tell me what I want to hear? Big Grin

sig2392, I'll definitely replace them with ball valves.

Looks like there is copper pipe and then galvanized valves. Confused Is that a normal thing to do? I've got to quit asking that at this house. There's nothing normal here.
 
Posts: 42621 | Location: Pennsyltucky | Registered: December 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That valve can be rebuilt but if you're going to start wrenching on things you might as well just replace it .
 
Posts: 2243 | Location: The deep South | Registered: February 27, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
Tornados
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I'm not a plumber, and I'm likely to cause a Tsunami in your house with that leak, but.....

I'd remove the screw, take off the handle knob thingey, and gently tighten the valve righty tighty just a little wee bit. Reassemble.

If it stops leaking, go have a nice cold barley pop, put your feet up, chill.
.
 
Posts: 9910 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you are going to replace the valve(I would), I would use a liberal amount of Break Free, or any type of penetrating oil BEFORE you start hogging on the valve. Maybe give the oil a day or two to penetrate the rust. Just a thought.
 
Posts: 5588 | Location: Az | Registered: May 27, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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Find all the other stuff in your house that needs plumbing repair, then call the plumber.
 
Posts: 10626 | Location: Stuck at home | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you choose to replace it, please make sure you put a wrench on the elbow behind it as a hold back when wrenching the valve off. Make sure you turn off the main shut off first! Wink


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"Once abolish the God, and the Government becomes the God." --- G.K. Chesterton
 
Posts: 3373 | Location: WNY | Registered: April 11, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Since it staryed leaking after you used it, you could just tighten the packing nut say 1/8 of a turn.
The packing nut is the one around the valve stem.
Hold the valve body with a wrench, and tighten the packing nut just a little.
If the nut moves easily, it will stop the leak, all done.
Do not go nuts!!!!!! You could snap the valve or the pipe. If it doesnt turn fairly easily, then replace the valves.
 
Posts: 777 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: August 16, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Get my pies
outta the oven!

Picture of PASig
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Those are ancient, they look really old and decrepit like the ones I had. Just had them replaced by our plumber when he was here doing some other work.

This is what I had and what he replaced them with:







Some of those old valves are SO old, they used LEATHER wagers/gaskets in them.


I’d advise you get them replaced ASAP too, these valves are really good. Peace of mind is worth some $$$


 
Posts: 28042 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Nosce te ipsum
Picture of Woodman
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Those are pretty beefy packing nuts. I’d snug them up some more.

Decent ‘boiler drains’, as those valves are sometimes called, are about $8 each. Lefty-loosie to remove, righty-tighty to install new ones. Don’t forget to turn the water off first.



Committee members eager to shine before the nominee fought to leave the shiniest apple on teacher’s desk.
 
Posts: 8494 | Location: Mid-Atlantic Region | Registered: March 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Man Once
Child Twice
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A plumber would say ‘ it’s waiting to be touched’.
 
Posts: 10766 | Location: NE OHIO | Registered: October 22, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Trophy Husband
Picture of C L Wilkins
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Actually, that is an easy fix. Take off the valve stem (make sure that you use a back-up wrench. The rubber washer has gotten hard and the packing on the stem needs to be replaced.

Simple fix and you don't have to replace the valve.
 
Posts: 3136 | Location: Texas | Registered: June 29, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Look to be 1/2" valves... if they happen to be 3/4, search the site below for "3/4 inch boiler drains".

Pick the style you like best. Both brands are good to go and are ball valves.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/Le...Ball-Valve-Lead-Free

https://www.supplyhouse.com/Wa...Drain-Cock-Lead-Free




 
Posts: 9164 | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
W07VH5
Picture of mark123
posted Hide Post
Yeah, I was thinking of cutting back to the copper and soldering on a ball valve but screwing one in sounds a lot simpler. Thanks everyone.

And of course I’ve found another valve that’s stuck closed. It’s for the back yard hose faucet. It feels spongy to turn but won’t move beyond about 1/16 turn. That’s definitely going to need soldered in. Looks like next Sunday is going to be busy.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: mark123,
 
Posts: 42621 | Location: Pennsyltucky | Registered: December 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Run Silent
Run Deep

Picture of Patriot
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Mark,

You can replace the packing. It’s very easy to do and somewhat generic on that type/ diameter stem.

As a Navy machinist mate, I’ve done it many times.

Turn off water
Put valve in mid position
Take off handle
Remove packing nut
Use dental type tool to remove old packing
Insert new packing
Install packing nut and tighten
Cycle valve open and closed several times
Put valve in mid position
Tighten again making sure you can still cycle valve
Turn on water…watch for leaks packing may take a little time to swell.
Adjust packing nut again after a few cycles of valve.


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Posts: 6262 | Location: South East, Pa | Registered: July 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
W07VH5
Picture of mark123
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I could repack it but isn’t it better to replace it with a ball valve?

I have both pipe dope and Teflon tape. Which is better for this sort of fitting or doesn’t it matter?
 
Posts: 42621 | Location: Pennsyltucky | Registered: December 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mark123:
I could repack it but isn’t it better to replace it with a ball valve?

I have both pipe dope and Teflon tape. Which is better for this sort of fitting or doesn’t it matter?


Pipe dope is almost always a better option for permanent applications.





13 years to retirement! Just waiting!
 
Posts: 4092 | Location: Seoul | Registered: August 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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