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Current situation in South Africa, looting and burning everything Login/Join 
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Keep in mind that in South Africa, the police (at all levels) are merely political tools whom the public has very little faith. Private security has taken up the roll of law enforcement and security amongst neighborhoods and business'; of course this merely means that those who have the means, can purchase their safety.
With these riots and the further hollowing-out of a country's institutions that was the envy of the continent, SA is in for another round of hurt by their own hands. Corruption once again ruins a country.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: corsair,
 
Posts: 11609 | Location: Wine Country | Registered: September 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Big Stack
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The weather is better

quote:
Originally posted by ChuckWall:
I'm hard-pressed to tell the place from Chicago.
 
Posts: 20315 | Registered: November 05, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by ARman:
He said that alot of what's going on there are marxist that for years, have used racial tensions to gain power, he can see it happening here.


This can not be over emphasized.
 
Posts: 2944 | Location: Western PA | Registered: July 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Raptorman
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The productive citizens will run out of ammo before they run out of invaders.

It's high time to abandon the country.


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Posts: 32356 | Location: North, GA | Registered: October 09, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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These videos are just like the black lives matter thugs in America doing their thing!
 
Posts: 914 | Location: Virginia | Registered: August 03, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
chickenshit
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quote:
Originally posted by Silent:
I’m not convinced by what I see going on now in South Africa and, seemingly every weekend in Chicago, can be explained though the lens of race/genetics. In my view it has very much less to do with race/genetics than it is a natural result of destroyed family structures, the adoption of unprofitable cultural values and, an acceptance of a lack of agency on the part of many of these individuals; plus the fact that liberals need a victim.

It seems to me that much of what we are seeing is the Drama Trianglewrit large. Liberal elites need victims to rescue so that they can feel good about themselves so they offer what I heard a pastor refer as “untethered sympathy” (no evaluation as to whether sympathy towards the other is justified) towards those they seek to rescue. These folks give no responsibility to the victim perhaps because their goal is not to fix the victim but to play the hero. Because of this, these folks don’t care if their “solutions” work since it was never ever about actually helping the victim. In the Drama Triangle the persecutor needs someone to blame for why things are the way they are.

Dr. Anthony Daniels, who writes under the pen name of Theodore Dalrymple, in his book, Life at the Bottom convincingly shows that whites with a multi-generational history of living in the slums and prisons of London exhibit the same values and cultural norms as do groups in our own country; race, though easy to label, seems less likely a cause of much of the current wave of lawlessness.

Silent


The breakdown of family structure is key. If family and community values are devalued by political machination or gradual erosion anarchy follows.


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Posts: 7665 | Location: East Central FL | Registered: January 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The situation is far worse than those clips show. The looting engulfed huge swathes of the city.

Durban is also a massive logistical hub, it moves something like 60% of all container traffic for the country, which has now come to a halt. The entire logistical chain is at a standstill as the risks of moving anything are too high. Already food and fuel shortages are being reported inland as the main N3 highway has also been blocked.
It seems over 200 shopping malls have been vandalized and from what I can pick up, the situation is still not under control.

https://twitter.com/i/status/1415210379970551808
https://twitter.com/rinmor/status/1414885575312740352
 
Posts: 96 | Location: Jhb, South Africa | Registered: February 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
No, not like
Bill Clinton
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quote:
60% of all container traffic for the country, which has now come to a halt


Sounds like it's only going to get worse, good luck to you Sir

Hopefully you are well armed and supplied


*********************
“I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice, and then going away and doing the exact opposite.”
 
Posts: 3569 | Location: GA | Registered: September 23, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Husband, Father, Aggie,
all around good guy!
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quote:
Originally posted by sigamt:
The situation is far worse than those clips show. The looting engulfed huge swathes of the city.

Durban is also a massive logistical hub, it moves something like 60% of all container traffic for the country, which has now come to a halt. The entire logistical chain is at a standstill as the risks of moving anything are too high. Already food and fuel shortages are being reported inland as the main N3 highway has also been blocked.
It seems over 200 shopping malls have been vandalized and from what I can pick up, the situation is still not under control.

https://twitter.com/i/status/1415210379970551808
https://twitter.com/rinmor/status/1414885575312740352


sigamt, I am really sorry your country is experiencing this.

Be safe, keep us updated please.

HK Ag
 
Posts: 2968 | Location: Tomball, Texas | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So what is expected next? No fuel delivery, people low of food, rioting and killing for food?


-c1steve
 
Posts: 3390 | Location: West coast | Registered: March 31, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bettysnephew:
So, while these folks are so busy destroying businesses, why don't the business owners go and burn down areas of the city that are known to house looters? That would seem to be fair.



The churches, factories, homes, and shops being looted and burned are in the districts where the arsonists, looters, and rioters live. This is the defining characteristic of urban riots.

quote:
Originally posted by gearhounds:
... Kill them all...


In the early days of the insurrection to rid South Africa of apartheid that is what the South African security forces tried to accomplish. It didn't work because CNN isn't going to give air time to the body of an armed black looter shot dead by a black policeman; CNN would only show a baby beaten to death by a rioter, but held out to buttress a claim it was an evil white supremacist skinhead Nazi Waffen-SS Hauptsturmführer who was randomly wandering the veld stomping babies' faces in with their hobnailed jackboots.

The only way South Africa can solve this problem is by publicly executing every government official convicted of corruption,.





Nice is overrated

"It's every freedom-loving individual's duty to lie to the government."
Airsoftguy, June 29, 2018

 
Posts: 29395 | Location: Loudoun County, Virginia | Registered: May 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sigamt:
The situation is far worse than those clips show. The looting engulfed huge swathes of the city.

Can you provide some perspective to what's precipitated the looting and destruction of business?
Is this really all about Zuma's arrest or, really just opportunists grabbing whatever they can get their hands on?
How involved is the EFF with the current events?
 
Posts: 11609 | Location: Wine Country | Registered: September 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The police are no where to be seen and local citizens are using their sporting rifles and handguns to protect their neighborhoods. They are even sharing their ammo with law enforcement because nobody has enough…

This is happening while the government is trying to take away citizens right to keep and bear arms…Sound familiar??

https://youtu.be/raFZNEXb7hM


------------------
Eddie

Our Founding Fathers were men who understood that the right thing is not necessarily the written thing. -kkina
 
Posts: 5194 | Location: SML & OBX | Registered: February 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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After visiting South Africa several years ago, the most vivid images I remember are the "shanty towns". Located on the outskirts of the city-- a telephone pole in the central area for power, outhouses on the periphery, 4 x 4 shelters contructed out of scraps.
Driving through the city, I was struck by the elaborate fences each house had. The walls were a minimum of 8" high-topped off by electrified fencing.
Home Security was a top priority for those that Have the resources.
 
Posts: 1818 | Location: Southeast CT | Registered: January 18, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Wait, what?
Picture of gearhounds
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quote:
The only way South Africa can solve this problem is by publicly executing every government official convicted of corruption

I agree that the globalist press isn’t going to be doing them any favors, but this is a mob that is doing way more damage, mayhem, and outright attacks on the the countries economy. Many of these businesses will not be back, especially if the government doesn’t put a screeching halt to it. The only thing that will stop these savages is wholesale slaughter with LOTS of video proof that they died doing what they loved.

My biggest fear for SA and even here is the good people that are sick and tired of the sanctioned lawlessness will be the targets for taking the law into their own hands. I absolutely believe that is the democRATS goal here. It’s clear they have no interest in doing what’s best for the country on any level.




“We have put together, I think, the most extensive and and inclusive voter fraud organization in the history of American politics.”- Joe Biden
 
Posts: 12753 | Location: Martinsburg WV | Registered: April 02, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Lawyers, Guns
and Money
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quote:
My biggest fear for SA and even here is the good people that are sick and tired of the sanctioned lawlessness will be the targets for taking the law into their own hands. I absolutely believe that is the democRATS goal here. It’s clear they have no interest in doing what’s best for the country on any level.

Yep.
the good people who defend themselves will become the democRATS targets. We've already seen that in the aftermath of the false flag "riot" on January 6th. Those who protest a stolen election rot in jail.



"Some things are apparent. Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates and our ability to control our own destiny atrophies. The result is: families under siege; war in the streets; unapologetic expropriation of property; the precipitous decline of the rule of law; the rapid rise of corruption; the loss of civility and the triumph of deceit. The result is a debased, debauched culture which finds moral depravity entertaining and virtue contemptible."
-- Justice Janice Rogers Brown

"The United States government is the largest criminal enterprise on earth."
-rduckwor
 
Posts: 19765 | Location: St. Louis, MO | Registered: April 03, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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According to CNN those would be mostly “peaceful demonstrations”. Wink
 
Posts: 4349 | Registered: November 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the support! Smile
I'm a long way from any of the unrest in Jhb and I'm pretty well stocked up as well. I'm probably one of very few individuals who loaded up on shotgun baton rounds as well as birdshot. If things really go pear-shaped I've got a MP5 clone and a 516 as well.
I spent 12 years as a Reservist in the SAP starting at the beginning of the 90's when the country really was burning so none of this really comes as much of a surprise. People have no clue just how thin the veneer of civilization is.

The violence has subsided now and everybody seems dazed by it.

Corsair, to answer your question, yes, some of it was sparked by Zuma's arrest and the Govt. is claiming that certain ex-MK members were instigating violence. However, when you talk about opportunists one doesn't realise just how desperate people are.
SA has 2 unemployment numbers, the narrow definition and the expanded number. The expanded number is people who have been unemployed for so long that they're pretty much given up looking for work. Our narrow unemployment is 32.5%. I believe that in the US at the height of the Great Depression the unemployment rate was around 25%. On the expanded rate, we jump to 42.5% unemployed. There are more people on social grants than there are in formal employment.
Since the ANC took over in '94 they have looted the country blind and under Zuma it pretty much reached biblical proportions. There are a lot of numbers being bandied around but a figure of USD 70Bn is most frequently mentioned over the last decade alone.
The economy has been mismanaged to the point where economic growth is around 1%.
So, the economy's toast going into 2020 and we get told we're having a 3-week lockdown to "flatten the curve" and prepare the hospitals. We get one of the hardest lockdowns on the planet. You could literally only leave your home to purchase food along with a raft of ludicrous restrictions. If you went into a supermarket you could purchase bacon but buying the frying pan was illegal. Anyway 3 weeks got extended by another 2 weeks and we then got a 5-level controlled re-opening which is still in force. So far it's something like 470 days so far of our State of Disaster. The levels get moved up and down like a lift. Anyway just before this rioting kicked off, we'd been moved back to a level-4. 21:00-04:00 curfew, can't purchase liquor, restaurants closed etc.

At the start of the lockdown, the unemployed are offered an assistance grant. This amounts to R350 per month. To put it in perspective this is the equivalent of 1 Big Mac every 3 days. Close on 10 million people applied with 6.5 million grants being paid each month. This grant ended at the end of April.

Violence has been allowed to flourish freely over many years. In 2019 there were something like 1400 trucks torched. A main flash point for that violence was also revisited in this violence. Ditto for the outbreak of xenophobic looting from a few years back.

Basically here, violence is rewarded, never condemned and pretty much never punished.

When you factor all of this in, it was inevitable. If you like mixed metaphors, the chickens have come home to roost but they can't land because of all the sacred cows in the field.

Here's also a pretty good read on the situation by a former editor of the Sunday Times.

https://unherd.com/2021/07/sou...ica-is-on-the-brink/

"The province of my birth is burning. Looters, using the excuse of the incarceration of former President Jacob Zuma, have laid an unimpeded trail of violence, arson, assault and damage across KwaZulu Natal, traditional home of the Zulu people.

Armed volunteers mount barricades at the entrances to my village while youngsters on trail bikes scout through the perimeter cane fields. There is no available food or fuel and the chat groups buzz with an incessant flood of posts about destroyed buildings, burnt cars and roaming mobs. The State is entirely absent.

For the first time, ordinary South Africans, bomb-proofed through decades of tumult, appear afraid for the future.

The democracy bought into existence 27 years ago after a negotiated truce between armed contestants, only some of whom were white, is facing its biggest challenge. Now it is not only the disgraced Zuma that is in the dock. It is also the current President, Cyril Ramaphosa.

The immediate spark for the conflagration was when, on 29 June this year, former President Jacob Zuma was ordered to serve 15 months in prison for refusing to appear before the Commission of Inquiry into State Capture — ironically a commission appointed by Zuma himself to investigate allegations of widespread corruption.

The response from political and even criminal forces, some of their leaders once office-bearers in the ruling African National Congress, was swift. They have mustered under the banner of something called Radical Economic Transformation which translates in method to the violent appropriation of wealth and in consequence to utter desolation. It is a more ambitious form of looting than the one currently on our television screens.

The incumbent, President Cyril Ramaphosa, was widely hailed on his election as leader of the African National Congress in 2017 as the saviour of the nation, a Mr Fix It Extraordinary with a luminary history in the trade unions, business and the negotiations that led to political emancipation. His promises of a New Dawn struck a resonance with a public desperately tired of the collapse in public morality and the accelerating race towards a failed state. Tragically, it has thus far proven a false dawn. The public anger is now palpable and dangerous.

I knew Cyril Ramaphosa when he was Chairman of the publishing company in which I was Editor and later Publisher of the South African Sunday Times, then the largest circulation newspaper in the country. I believe him to be an honourable and decent man, but not an effective one. He showed an almost obsessive desire to avoid confrontation, a preference for working through third parties and, later, a fierce aversion to taking tough decisions if it would affect party unity. More than once he privately confessed that he was a master at dancing on eggshells.

The hard decisions, like weeding out the criminals in his party, were outsourced to the Courts, the Commission of Inquiry into State Capture, the media or political hitmen in his own party. Thus, he retained a serene, surreal aloofness amid the growing signs of chaos, division and policy-failure around him, restricting himself largely to sepulchral public utterances on safe-zone topics like gender-based violence, Smart Cities, Covid-19 and platitudinous statements of good intent. This rule-by-remote has born a bitter fruit.

Shortly after my appointment as Editor of the Sunday Times in 1996, I made a point of engaging the newly-elected ministers in the ANC Government. Invariably I was asked what I perceived to be the greatest challenges facing the infant government. Always I replied: the loss of the nation’s precious skills and investment resources. The caution was obviously lost in the translation.

Under the guise of redistributive economic programmes, the ANC ushered in the policy of Black Economic Empowerment. Whatever its good intentions, it turned into a one-way flow of money extorted with state sanction from private or public purses into the hands of a monstrously avaricious new elite. The proceeds were instantly monetised and consumed in a style that would put a Byzantine court to shame. This has not gone unnoticed by the people burning the malls today.

To gain control of the state, the ANC followed a policy of “cadre deployment” of party faithful to occupy every level of government. Unable to even manage its own party affairs, they had no hope of managing a modern state. Everywhere there was dysfunction, collapse and corruption, the burden again borne most heavily by the poor. Across the spectrum, the internal party factionalism was replicated by the “deployees” in the State Departments.

The amounts stolen in the so-called State Capture project is dwarfed by the loss of wealth, tax, opportunity and confidence caused by the twin policies of black empowerment and cadre deployment, the core enablers of State Capture. Yet a generation after political emancipation, President Ramaphosa still refuses to renounce or even modify either policy. That has been his first great lost opportunity.

The second was not to appeal over the heads of his own party to the country for support for a genuinely reformist programme when elected in 2017. Granted, his election as leader of the ANC was a near-run thing and to this day there persists the claims by his opponents that he bribed his way to victory in the party’s elective conference.

Others suggested that he needed time to win over his suspicious caucus, many members with bank accounts that could hardly bear forensic scrutiny; more time to dance on eggshells. Perhaps, but the delay has proved mortally damaging to the nation

The Commission of Inquiry into State Capture under Deputy Judge President Raymond Zondo has ploughed its way through thousands of hours of testimony in its 38-month existence, minutely confirming the media’s decade-long reporting about how bad things really were during the Zuma years. If this was intended to placate the public, it did not.

The endless delays in commencing criminal procedures because of the devastation of the criminal justice system by a toxic combination of “cadre deployment” and criminal intent, further eroded confidence. Thirty or so good investigators, auditors and prosecutors with support staff, immediately hired from the private sector or from abroad, would have done what the Zondo Commission could not do: put the culprits in prison quickly and at a fraction of the cost… but that would have required a hard decision from President Ramaphosa.

Enthralled by the Soprano-style tale of warring ANC factions daily playing out in the Zondo Commission, the public easily forgot to ask the big question: how well was President Ramaphosa governing?

The answer: badly, very badly.

He has failed to repudiate any of his predecessors disastrous policies: seizure of land without compensation; the Government’s land redistribution policy which has seen productivity of transferred land fall by 87%; the free tertiary education policy which has turned once great universities into day-care centres for uneducated young people; the highly restrictive labour policies or the huge state social welfare and public service bills. All of this compounded by a mismanaged and inappropriate State response to the various recent coronavirus outbreaks. Serial lockdowns have massively affected employment and driven urban and rural poverty, particularly in KwaZulu-Natal.

The consequence has been stuttering economic growth and the highest youth unemployment rate in the country’s history, many of the unemployed now playing cameo roles on our television screens as the malls burn. No society can or will endure such casually-inflicted pain.

But perhaps the worst consequence of Ramaphosa’s rule-by-remote, and expulsion-by-commission, has been the creation of space for his opponents to mobilise, mainly in their heartland, the province of KwaZulu Natal, from whence Jacob Zuma and many supporters hail, where his main ethnic power base lies (although by no means do all Zulus support Zuma) and where my family has lived for five generations. Throw in legions of unemployed and one has a volatile mix.

The violence has completely overwhelmed an already incompetent police force: there have even been instances of local communities supporting recently arrived reinforcements with food and munitions because they arrived so unprepared.

For years the ANC-controlled province, often cruelly dubbed the Sicily of South Africa, has been the site of growing insurrectionary activity: hijacking of transport on main routes, seizure of schools and universities, xenophobic outbreaks, sabotage of municipal infrastructure, mafia-style blackmailing of construction companies, violent factional wars by ANC claimants to office, and wholesale corruption in public affairs (even as Zuma was entering incarceration, the pro-Zuma mayor of the province’s largest city was facing charges of corruption, along with 16 councillors). The perpetrators have acted with impunity and a growing boldness presaging today’s crisis.

All of this has been compounded by a hiatus of authority in the Zulu Royal Family, traditionally a source of stability in the province’s rural areas, albeit a prickly one. The recent death of King Goodwill Zwelithini has brought a disputed succession and a fracturing of loyalties.

In short, the province is destabilised and trapped in a classic first phase of revolution, driven by what appears to be a determined yet still shadowy alliance of usurped politicians and opportunistic criminals. In the frame right now for being the instigators are renegade former — and possibly current — elements of the State Security Agency, which during Zuma’s years became a virtual in-house close protection unit to serve his personal and nefarious interests. Army and police loyalties are still unclear.

President Ramaphosa’s response to all this growing chaos through the months has been a Herculean detachment, punctuated by a few anodyne homilies, not unlike his unctuous and comfortless national television address on Monday night.

The insurrection will no doubt be suppressed, my province will return to its fraught peace but the damage to South Africa and the country will be lasting. This province, certainly, will never forgive President Ramaphosa for sacrificing it on the altar of his own weakness and unpreparedness.

And the bigger question will remain: will the Dancer on Eggshells see the latest outbreak of insurrectionary and criminal violence as a reason for another instinctive compromise? Or will he see it as an invocation to move forward with a bold programme of renewal which must inevitably include splitting his party, dumping many of its discredited and failed policies, and taking all necessary measures to return the country to stability. Those are essential precondition for progress. It is not looking hopeful."
 
Posts: 96 | Location: Jhb, South Africa | Registered: February 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Good luck, stay safe. Thank you for the detail - we too are seeing Cadre deployment and have a leader who could be characterized as
“Dancer on eggshells”. I hope SA can pull out of this as seems like a route to national destruction.





“Forigive your enemy, but remember the bastard’s name.”

-Scottish proverb
 
Posts: 1999 | Location: South Florida | Registered: December 24, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Youtube link to a very recent video by Impact Shooting, who lives in South Africa.

https://youtu.be/hDhNSh5iMQU


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