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Primer pockets: How clean? Ream, uniform, or swage? Login/Join 
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Hey all-

What's your method re: primer pockets? Tumble brass before or after primer removal? (I wet tumble with SS pins).
Brush the pocket till some gunk is gone or till it shines like new brass?
Swage or ream or uniform?

And what the hell do we do with flash holes after we buy the "flash hole uniform tool"? Is it just for removing hanging chads or are we smoothing it out? Do you toss brass with larger/oval holes?

I have been trimming and chamfering brass for the last couple of days and it's making me more and more detail obsessed Smile

Bruce




Every day, the New York Times carries a motto in a box on its front page. "All the News That's Fit to Print," it says. It's been saying it for decades, day in and day out. I imagine most readers of the canonical sheet have long ceased to notice this bannered and flaunted symbol of its mental furniture. I myself check every day to make sure that the bright, smug, pompous, idiotic claim is still there. Then I check to make sure that it still irritates me. If I can still exclaim, under my breath, why do they insult me and what do they take me for and what the hell is it supposed to mean unless it's as obviously complacent and conceited and censorious as it seems to be, then at least I know I still have a pulse. You may wish to choose a more rigorous mental workout but I credit this daily infusion of annoyance with extending my lifespan. -Christopher Hitchens

"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child — miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosophy of sniveling brats."
-PJ O'Rourke
“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

 
Posts: 3754 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
quarter MOA visionary
Picture of smschulz
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Removing the primer is my first step.
Then I pocket prep.
I have a Dillon Swage but prefer to ream for accuracy and precision.
Flash holes redone as needed ~ you usually can visually check fairly easily.
Then I wet tumble with SS.
Anything massively out of whack that can be fixed is tossed.
FWIW, trimming is way down the assembly line.
I use a series of Husky bins in a stack that I label for different stages.
That way I can do certain part and just move it down the bin until finished.
Easier to keep track of that way.
 
Posts: 18322 | Location: Houston, TX | Registered: June 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of sourdough44
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I don’t see the cartridge mentioned? I’m more ‘as needed’ with primer pockets. Of course with crimped primers, one has to swage it out, I use a hand tool.

With casual shooting, one would pick up an issue if you started having misfires, I don’t. My loads are mostly handgun, prairie dogging, or hunting loads. Can’t hardly remember the last ‘misfire’.

I do look, make sure it’s clear, then set the case upside down before priming.

Even the simple act of priming, there’s a ‘feel’ to it. If the primer isn’t fully seated, that also can cause problems.

The brass itself can dictate, type, number of firings, history, etc.. Even when using the ‘uniformed’ tool, not much is uniformed.
 
Posts: 4366 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is .308 brass. Federal Gold Medal Match, once fired. I cleaned it, deprimed it, then trimmed it to 2.005, then chamfered and cleaned primer pockets with the Trim Mate power kit.

Bruce




Every day, the New York Times carries a motto in a box on its front page. "All the News That's Fit to Print," it says. It's been saying it for decades, day in and day out. I imagine most readers of the canonical sheet have long ceased to notice this bannered and flaunted symbol of its mental furniture. I myself check every day to make sure that the bright, smug, pompous, idiotic claim is still there. Then I check to make sure that it still irritates me. If I can still exclaim, under my breath, why do they insult me and what do they take me for and what the hell is it supposed to mean unless it's as obviously complacent and conceited and censorious as it seems to be, then at least I know I still have a pulse. You may wish to choose a more rigorous mental workout but I credit this daily infusion of annoyance with extending my lifespan. -Christopher Hitchens

"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child — miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosophy of sniveling brats."
-PJ O'Rourke
“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

 
Posts: 3754 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of sourdough44
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Kinda obvious, but one doing ‘precision rifle’ could very well include more steps than the casual, high round, pistol reloader.

I remember a meet with a gunsmith years ago, he was also somewhat into precision rifle shooting. At the time, most of my reloading was casual handgun & prairie dogging ammo.

He asked me to go over my steps to reload a 223 case. When done he mentioned that I left out a few, most to do with primer pocket attention.

Again, even after trips to dog town, I don’t remember having any duds.
 
Posts: 4366 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A lot depends on the caliber and brass..

6Dasher, 6.5 Creedmoor Competition - deprime, stainless tumble, inspect. If there is residual then I use a RCBS pocket uniformer. Two twists and move on.

223 or 308 - deprime, stainless tumble, inspect. If there is a crimp, chamfer to remove and hit with uniformer.

I don't spend a lot of time or effort on the primer end of the cartridge. It is the least critical component of the process.

I routinely have SD of 3-5 on my competition brass.

Andrew



Duty is the sublimest word in the English Language - Gen Robert E Lee.
 
Posts: 757 | Registered: May 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Haveme1or2
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I enjoy bench rest competition shooting 100 - 1000.
I have match rifles.
To answer the primer pocket cleaning question. I use an rcb wire brush on a electric screwdriver. I'm thinking a prep station would sure be nice but I've done really well as I'm doing.
I buy lapua brass it's always been perfect but chads are possible so i lightly spin a flash hole tool both sides.
I've heard of some cheaper cases missing the punch and there was no hole so it's good to check.
I do allot more on brass, primer, bullet prep ... But that's another thread.
 
Posts: 894 | Location: Mint Hill NC | Registered: November 26, 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Suggest to let the target show you what works.
 
Posts: 2868 | Location: 9860 ft above sea level Colorado | Registered: December 31, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by offgrid:
Suggest to let the target show you what works.


Offgrid- While I have no doubt you are correct, I am at the learning stage of eliminating variables, not interpreting them. I humbly submit that I would have no clue as to which what causing what, on the target.

But, I will, later! Smile

Bruce




Every day, the New York Times carries a motto in a box on its front page. "All the News That's Fit to Print," it says. It's been saying it for decades, day in and day out. I imagine most readers of the canonical sheet have long ceased to notice this bannered and flaunted symbol of its mental furniture. I myself check every day to make sure that the bright, smug, pompous, idiotic claim is still there. Then I check to make sure that it still irritates me. If I can still exclaim, under my breath, why do they insult me and what do they take me for and what the hell is it supposed to mean unless it's as obviously complacent and conceited and censorious as it seems to be, then at least I know I still have a pulse. You may wish to choose a more rigorous mental workout but I credit this daily infusion of annoyance with extending my lifespan. -Christopher Hitchens

"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child — miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosophy of sniveling brats."
-PJ O'Rourke
“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

 
Posts: 3754 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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As I explain in my stickied thread, I do as little as possible to the primer pocket. The virgin brass I buy, Lapua, has drilled flash holes, no hanging chads to remove. When I loaded with Winchester, I would knock off the chad from the punch from inside the case only once.

I do not like to insert anything but a primer in the pocket as it will get too big soon enough.

I did not read where you actually resize the case, but I left the depriming pin in my resizing dies and I deprime the case during the resizing operation. Then I throw the cases in rotary tumbler for a few hours. After that, it's trim/chamfer/deburr and ready to prime and load.

I don't worry about a little dirt left in the pocket.
 
Posts: 3159 | Location: Texas | Registered: June 20, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Foe the dirtier cases, I was using the universal decapping die to deprime. I am using the resizing die to deprime, now. Trimming after.
I have mostly Federal GMM brass that was fired once in this rifle along with a few Lake City from some M118LR that shot well. I have a flash hole deburring tool arriving today as a number of flash holes are kind of ugly.
The Lapua brass is very pretty. I won't do anything to that. As a matter of fact, the Lapua brass will sit there until I have a few more cycles of loading and firing the brass that I am currently using.
I will make my mistakes on the less pricey stuff and apply the lessons to the good stuff.

Bruce




Every day, the New York Times carries a motto in a box on its front page. "All the News That's Fit to Print," it says. It's been saying it for decades, day in and day out. I imagine most readers of the canonical sheet have long ceased to notice this bannered and flaunted symbol of its mental furniture. I myself check every day to make sure that the bright, smug, pompous, idiotic claim is still there. Then I check to make sure that it still irritates me. If I can still exclaim, under my breath, why do they insult me and what do they take me for and what the hell is it supposed to mean unless it's as obviously complacent and conceited and censorious as it seems to be, then at least I know I still have a pulse. You may wish to choose a more rigorous mental workout but I credit this daily infusion of annoyance with extending my lifespan. -Christopher Hitchens

"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child — miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosophy of sniveling brats."
-PJ O'Rourke
“It is just as difficult and dangerous to try to free a people that wants to remain servile as it is to try to enslave a people that wants to remain free."
-Niccolo Machiavelli

 
Posts: 3754 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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