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Hornady OAL tool review & discussion about cartridge/brass measurement Login/Join 
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Picture of exx1976
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Link to original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cX1M3Nk_CkM




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Posts: 15652 | Location: Location, Location  | Registered: April 09, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have one from years ago when they were Stoney Point, but soon switched to using the Sinclair OAL Tool. The advantage to using Sinclair is you use a fired case from your rifle to determine OAL which is more accurate than using the unfired threaded brass made by Hornady.

Determining OAL is a complex topic, I am interested to see how deep this discussion goes on this subject.
 
Posts: 779 | Location: Dallas, TX | Registered: January 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A piece of fired brass can be used with this tool as well if one wishes to drill and tap the primer pocket of a piece of fired brass.

As noted in the video, this isn't the best method for determining where the rifling beings with absolute precision.

However, for the average reloader who wants an easy way to get "pretty close", the Hornady OAL tool certainly serves the purpose.

One thing not mentioned in the video, and in hindsight, I should have mentioned, is that if you change bullets, this process needs to be repeated.

This is due to the fact that the diameter of the collets that measure off the ogive are not idential to the bore diameter of the rifle. It would be helpful if they were (and a friend actually drilled his out and then hot-glued in a Redding bushing to alleviate this problem), but they aren't. And I understand why they aren't - I mean, think of how many different diameter bullets/bores there really are. You'd have to have at least several dozen of those collets, as opposed to simply the handful they provide in the kit.




Every time you make a typo, the errorists win.
 
Posts: 15652 | Location: Location, Location  | Registered: April 09, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nice video

I used the Hornady oal tool to find the lands and other tools to find the maximum case trim length. You did a excellent job explaining the procedure to find the lands, head space, and to sort the bullets, I sort mine by bearing surface.
 
Posts: 362 | Location: Minnesota  | Registered: June 14, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by exx1976:
One thing not mentioned in the video, and in hindsight, I should have mentioned, is that if you change bullets, this process needs to be repeated.

This is due to the fact that the diameter of the collets that measure off the ogive are not idential to the bore diameter of the rifle. It would be helpful if they were (and a friend actually drilled his out and then hot-glued in a Redding bushing to alleviate this problem), but they aren't. And I understand why they aren't - I mean, think of how many different diameter bullets/bores there really are. You'd have to have at least several dozen of those collets, as opposed to simply the handful they provide in the kit.


Why would your friend care what the actual distance to the lands is? Is it so he doesn't need to re-measure between different bullets? It only takes a second to take the measurement, so modifying the tool hardly seems worth it. The tool itself takes a comparative measurement. Besides, I like the idea of repeating the measurement. Bullets can change, or the rifle's throat may have eroded.

Making your own case from spent brass would be of great benefit to getting an accurate measurement.



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Posts: 5011 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Let's just say that he's retired, has lots of time on his hands, and prefers utmost precision in everything he does. He does re-measure every single time, but wants to know EXACTLY. I don't pretend to understand his reasoning behind everything. I just found this particular oddity interesting. Lol




Every time you make a typo, the errorists win.
 
Posts: 15652 | Location: Location, Location  | Registered: April 09, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great video, thanks for posting it. I like the way you explained the process clearly. Another thing I would mention that drove me crazy when I started reloading was that a brand new rifle barrel can have these measurements change slightly even when using the same bullet - as you shoot hundreds and thousands of rounds.

Like you said, it's not the end all-be all accurate way to measure, but for load development it's very handy.




"I have a suggestion to keep you all occupied. Learn to swim" - Ænema
 
Posts: 4591 | Location: Puyallup, WA | Registered: November 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Master-at-Arms
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Tagged, perfect timing. I just picked up that identical set up from a guy over on arf. I've loaded tons of pistol, but never tapered rifle cartridges, so I'm certain this vid will be a big help. Thanks.



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Posts: 6755 | Location: Stuck in NY, FUAC  | Registered: November 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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