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How does one cull cases that will be too long? Login/Join 
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9mm Every round (for competition) put together using a Dillon Square Deal is checked with headspace gauge. Too many do not pass as being too long and a very few for being too fat. [Have a PPS-M2 that seems to digest the out of tolerance rounds and a 9mm revolver that indexes on the rim.]

Please suggest means for culling clean, deprimed, used cases so that fewer fail to pass gauge when loaded. Thanks


Mac in Michigan
 
Posts: 439 | Location: Below the Bridge in Michigan | Registered: July 04, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Are you sure it’s case length rather than inadequate crimp or inadequate resizing? I don’t think I’ve ever had a pistol case get too long before it split.
 
Posts: 7510 | Location: The Red part of Minnesota | Registered: October 06, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'd expect the best practice would be to trim your brass to a common length. You should only need to do this once with pistol brass.

You could also try a Lee FCD. Say what you want about Lee, but their factory crimp die is a really nice tool for pistol loading to prevent "fat" rounds, since its last action is to pull the loaded round through a resizing die.



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Posts: 5746 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks MNSIG. Not clear what the cause is of the rare too-fat loaded cases. However, the other rejects have too much distance between rim and mouth. When I push down the cartridge when it is in the gauge it stops on the inside "ledge" with some of the rim above the gauge.

sigcrazy7 suggest trimming cases. What tool/tooling is available to perform this task?

I intend to mark the cases that have been loaded and found to be too long so that those cases are not mixed with "right" length cases after they have been shot in insensitive firearms. What sort of marking pens or the like have been found to work? Thanks


Mac in Michigan
 
Posts: 439 | Location: Below the Bridge in Michigan | Registered: July 04, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The Constable
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What sizing die are You using?

Is it set up to size as far down the case as possible?

Is Your brass all originally new and fired only in your gun? Or is it random range pickups?
 
Posts: 5943 | Location: Craig, MT | Registered: December 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It is hard to figure why cases were too long. Straight (or slightly tapered) cases don't really stretch on firing. Is there a brand that was longer to start with? Still, if they are all within SAAMI specs, they shouldn't grow beyond them.




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Posts: 46663 | Location: Texas | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Using a Lee Carbide Factory Crimp die is NOT a bright idea with anything but quality jacketed bullets. The sizing of the case sizes the bullet smaller than it should be. Promoting leading.
Causing plating or coating to be stripped off the bullet.

Using a Lee Taper crimp or Redding Taper crimp die is a better idea.

A person will always have "coke" bottle rounds.
They should chamber and shoot just fine. I have been loading auto loading rounds since the early 80's. And, I have never trimmed a pc of handgun brass except for heavy recoiling round so I can apply a uniform crimp.
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: March 16, 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I check every round in a case gauge before loading magazines. Most loaded cases that don't make the cut are due to the rim being marred by whatever pistol it was shot in(range brass). I use 145 gr LRN for USPSA and some random cases are thicker, heavier and do not drop in the gauge. These are set aside and shot for practice or pulled if really messed. All are loaded on a 550 with Dillon dies. The only caliber I use the LFCD is on 300 BLK Out. On pistol loads, a quality taper crimp die is best.
 
Posts: 1077 | Location: Montana | Registered: October 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When I can find something that works to mark the over-long cases (so that they can for sure be segregated) I will mark and shoot them. Any suggestions on a marking system?

When the marked cases are gathered, I will endeavor to see if anything correlates with the source of the cases.

I am using the 9mm dies that came with the Dillin Square Deal system. Those dies are not standard.

I have not ever used just-lead bullets. Virtually all of the bullets have been either Berry 115 HB or HAP 115. [I tried some 147 Berry with light powder charge and it did not seem to help recoil.]

Thanks for the observations. Mac


Mac in Michigan
 
Posts: 439 | Location: Below the Bridge in Michigan | Registered: July 04, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have not seen an overly long 9mm case and only a few .45s. I submit that the reason you may be showing rim above the gauge is a burr or ding on the rim itself. Turn an offending cartridge around and see if the rim will enter the gauge. It won't go in far, the 9mm is tapered. If not, there is the problem. A minor burr can be rubbed off by twisting the round in the entry to the gauge.
 
Posts: 2709 | Location: Florence, Alabama, USA | Registered: July 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Rule #1: Use enough gun
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quote:
You could also try a Lee FCD.

WORD!



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Posts: 14425 | Location: Birmingham, Alabama | Registered: February 25, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by P320Mac:
When I can find something that works to mark the over-long cases (so that they can for sure be segregated) I will mark and shoot them. Any suggestions on a marking system?


Couldn’t you color the case bottom with a blue or black permanent marker?
 
Posts: 398 | Registered: January 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of jmorris
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Why do you think they are too long?

If it is because the rim is above the case gauge, try putting the case in backwards and give it a twist.

If the rim won’t enter the gauge from bottom first, if won’t enter bullet first.
 
Posts: 462 | Location: DFW | Registered: May 03, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of xl_target
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quote:
Originally posted by 625JME:
Using a Lee Carbide Factory Crimp die is NOT a bright idea with anything but quality jacketed bullets. The sizing of the case sizes the bullet smaller than it should be. Promoting leading.
Causing plating or coating to be stripped off the bullet.

Using a Lee Taper crimp or Redding Taper crimp die is a better idea.

A person will always have "coke" bottle rounds.
They should chamber and shoot just fine. I have been loading auto loading rounds since the early 80's. And, I have never trimmed a pc of handgun brass except for heavy recoiling round so I can apply a uniform crimp.
if your FCD is changing the diameter of your bullets, you may not have it set correctly.
I've used them for years with coated and plated bullets and never had an issue with stripping the plating or coating (on 9mm and . 40 s&w) or changing bullet diameter.
 
Posts: 2228 | Registered: January 15, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of chansen92
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quote:
Originally posted by P320Mac:
9mm Every round (for competition) put together using a Dillon Square Deal is checked with headspace gauge. Too many do not pass as being too long and a very few for being too fat. [Have a PPS-M2 that seems to digest the out of tolerance rounds and a 9mm revolver that indexes on the rim.]

Please suggest means for culling clean, deprimed, used cases so that fewer fail to pass gauge when loaded. Thanks
I use a Caliper and measure every one of them every time I load for match. It's not a big deal as long as I don't use match brass for plinking. This whole thing is a hobby for me and I don't mind all the little steps. I also don't load too hot and stress the brass.
 
Posts: 1606 | Location: owosso,Mi. USA | Registered: August 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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