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All, just started reloading 9mm in my Dillon XL650 and I'm having some issues.

First off, let me admit that I just started doing handgun amm. I've done rifle for years now.

Anyways, two problems. First off, handle effort is BAD. I mean real bad. So bad, in fact, that I have RUINED two shellplates sizing 9mm. Now granted, I am using carbide dies (Dillon brand) without lube. This problem is probably easily remedied by using lube, but I am concerned because this seems out of the ordinary, especially for something like 9mm. And my buddy says he has NEVER used lube for pistol if he has carbide dies. This is cleaned range brass bought online, mixed headstamp. I read some stuff online and some people say this isn't all that weird since the 9mm case has a slight taper but , good god, this stuff feels like it was shot out of a .40 chamber. I would be less concerned with this except...

Problem number two. I have an LE Wilson case gage and I'm only batting about .500 on this brass fitting in the case gage. It starts in but the stuff that doesn't gage catches about 1/8" above the rim of the case. It's almost like the case isn't being sized down far enough. Marks on the cases almost seem to confirm this. My sizing die is kissing the shellplate on the upstroke. Again, it is a dillon carbide sizer. I again have read on the internet that this could be caused by the tapered lead in to the die. I have heard that Dillon's are bad for this because they are heavily tapered for reliability in a progressive machine. This reminds me of when my buddy was battling "glock bulge" on his .40 brass. Does this also occur with 9mm? Is a portion of the case unsupported in a 9mm glock barrel? I haven't tried chambering any of this stuff in my glock barrel yet. Perhaps I should.

These two problems almost seem to contradict each other. Any ideas on what I can try?
 
Posts: 90 | Registered: December 23, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of markstempski
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wow,
where to start. the Dillon DVD for setup and use is invaluable. In lieu of that you tube is still your friend. Lots of videos there on how to set up a dillon machine. I have a 550 so somewhat different. I have never heard of a shell plate getting munged. and straight wall 9mm cases should be dead easy lever effort wise.

Sounds like the resizing depth is not right as that would lead to problems with the case gauge.

It seems like most of the guppied Glock brass occurs with 40 S and W.


Mundus Vult Decipi
 
Posts: 1005 | Location: Duvall WA, USA | Registered: February 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I realize one doesn’t ‘have to’, but I do often use a bit of lube with handgun cases and carbide dies. That may be every 5th case or so on a turret type setup. As you mention, clean cases are essential also.

Just to eliminate problems you could try a few brand new 9mm cases, or a few ‘once fired’ from your own ammo supply. ‘Range brass’ bought off the net can have a checkered history.

The Dillon sizing die is likely just fine, could also try another make for grins.

Can we assume the bullet is fine, not causing more ‘bulge’ than normal?

I would experiment some, 9mm should be relatively easy and trouble free.
 
Posts: 3498 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It may be possible that Dillon goofed and sent you the wrong dies. Maybe 380 or just non carbide. Remove your sizing die and make sure it's got a carbide ring visible. It doesn't go the whole length of the die and it will be shiny and smooth. If that looks right then I would get in touch with Dillon ....they stand behind their stuff 100%. I have a square deal B and sizing is easy.
 
Posts: 174 | Location: Florida Gulf Coast | Registered: October 17, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of fredj338
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Yeah something is wrong with your die setup. Handle effort should be almost effortless, case lube or not with carbide. Check you have proper taper crimp setup, the likely cause of the rds not gauging. Sizing die should just kiss the properly tightened shell plate.


IF YOU AREN'T HANDLOADING, YOU AREN'T SHOOTING ENOUGH!
NRA Instruc: Basic Pistol & Met Reloading
 
Posts: 7748 | Location: ca, usa | Registered: February 17, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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9mm has always sized a little hard for me in my Lee Carbide dies, both in my LCT and my LNL...but never hard enough to damage anything. I think it's because of the slight taper in the case. I usually lube every 10th or 20th case and this keeps things running smooth. I also recently switched to Lucas oil polish in my tumbler...leaves the cases a bit slicker and helps them run through the dies a bit easier.

All that to say, 9mm is going to stick a little more than some calibers. But if you're damaging shellplates, something else is wrong.
 
Posts: 2890 | Location: In the Cornfields | Registered: May 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Fred's got a good point here.

Double check that sizing die and make sure its properly set. The re-sized case should drop right in and fall out of the case gauge freely.

Spray on case lube from Dillon or Frankford Arsenal are fairly cheap and I use them extensively. Wouldn't load without the lube on my 650.

I would start over and follow the manual step by step for tool head die set up. And don't forget the Dillon help number! Cool
 
Posts: 891 | Location: hampton roads, va. | Registered: October 03, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Call Dillon, their customer service is 2nd to none, and the guys on the phone are reloaders...they know what you're talking about. Five minutes on the phone will suffice, I'd suggest. Rod


5th Spl Forces, Air Force Bird Dog FAC, lll Corps RVN 69-70.... We enjoy the Bill of Rights through and by the sacrifice of our veterans;
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Posts: 539 | Registered: April 04, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Never a problem with the 550's but I tumble in media.
You ultra sonic clean and you get the problems you describe.This can be corrected by tumbling in media after the wet method .
 
Posts: 21639 | Location: Georgia | Registered: February 19, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
and this little pig said:
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quote:
You ultra sonic clean and you get the problems

Wow! I never realized that! I've been tumbling in media for 15+ years and was recently contemplating getting an ultra-sonic cleaner..... Will spend my cash on corncob media instead! Thanks!
 
Posts: 2770 | Registered: February 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by 45 Cal:
Never a problem with the 550's but I tumble in media.
You ultra sonic clean and you get the problems you describe.This can be corrected by tumbling in media after the wet method .


I reload on a RL550B and I use an ultra sonic cleaner. Never had any problems. Been doing it this way for many years. Why would the sonic cleaning method cause issues?


Sig P229 (9mm)
Sig P220 (45 ACP)
Springfield Armory XDE (9mm)
Springfield Armory XDE (45 ACP)
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Central Ohio | Registered: May 14, 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I reload on a RL550B and I use an ultra sonic cleaner. Never had any problems. Been doing it this way for many years. Why would the sonic cleaning method cause issues?

It makes the cases too clean, squeaky clean. So it offer much greater resistance to sizing & powder charging with a powder thru die. Why I prefer to still use dry media & a bit of polish.


IF YOU AREN'T HANDLOADING, YOU AREN'T SHOOTING ENOUGH!
NRA Instruc: Basic Pistol & Met Reloading
 
Posts: 7748 | Location: ca, usa | Registered: February 17, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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sagemind...spread your brass out on a towel and hit it with some Hornady One Shot.

https://www.midwayusa.com/prod...ot-case-lube-aerosol



"If you’re a leader, you lead the way. Not just on the easy ones; you take the tough ones too…” – MAJ Richard D. Winters (1918-2011), E Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne

"Woe to those who call evil good, and good evil... Therefore, as tongues of fire lick up straw and as dry grass sinks down in the flames, so their roots will decay and their flowers blow away like dust; for they have rejected the law of the Lord Almighty and spurned the word of the Holy One of Israel." - Isaiah 5:20,24
 
Posts: 5011 | Location: NW Houston | Registered: April 04, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of 45 Cal
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quote:
Originally posted by Amegatek:
quote:
Originally posted by 45 Cal:
Never a problem with the 550's but I tumble in media.
You ultra sonic clean and you get the problems you describe.This can be corrected by tumbling in media after the wet method .


I reload on a RL550B and I use an ultra sonic cleaner. Never had any problems. Been doing it this way for many years. Why would the sonic cleaning method cause issues?


Do what pleases you but if you pull a bullet you loaded that way and you will have gaulding on the bullet.
Don't think that affect the accurary that much ,for me I prefer things to run smooth with out the gritty when the bullet is seated.
 
Posts: 21639 | Location: Georgia | Registered: February 19, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by 45 Cal:

Do what pleases you but if you pull a bullet you loaded that way and you will have gaulding on the bullet.
Don't think that affect the accurary that much ,for me I prefer things to run smooth with out the gritty when the bullet is seated.


For pistol I use coated lead bullets from Blue Bullets and Eggleston Munitions. I have in fact pulled bullets and never had a galling problem. Also, I don't notice any grittiness in the bullet seating operation. Others may have these issues, but I fortunately do not.


Sig P229 (9mm)
Sig P220 (45 ACP)
Springfield Armory XDE (9mm)
Springfield Armory XDE (45 ACP)
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Central Ohio | Registered: May 14, 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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1. Use Hornady's case lube. We can discuss the reasons you don't need to but I found my efforts were rewarded by being faster and smoother using it.

2. Make sure your sizing die is correctly set. You only need one thread showing above the toolhead.

3. Make sure you lock the shell plate in place. And is not adjusted too tight. Back off and see if that aids in your motion.

4. Make sure you have the correct locator buttons.

5. The index pawl may be bent, worn or backwards.

9. Keep dirt from accumulating under the shell plate.

10. The index ball or spring may be missing or broken.

11. The ring indexer is worn or indexer block needs adjusting.

12. Make sure there is lube on the case insert slide.

13. Camming pin needs adjusting.


When properly set up you will breeze through the reloading process.




Getting shot is no achievement. Hitting your enemy is. FFL(01) NRA Endowment Member
 
Posts: 8208 | Location: Peoria, Arizona | Registered: April 02, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a 650 and use dillion dies for my 9 mm it runs the casing thru it like butter no lube. I also shoot them thru a glock 19 and a mp5. I would have to guess you have a die issue I would contact dillion. also make sure you press is bolted down to a study work bench.
 
Posts: 4637 | Registered: February 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have been reloading about 60 years now... based on that experience I have to agree the first step, anytime I have a problem with my Dillon equipment is a phone call to Dillon... They have never failed to patiently work with me to sort out the problem... no matter how difficult it is.

A few years ago I started reloading for 357SIG. All was well but I started breaking de-priming pins... I used up my spares in short order. I called Dillon and no one seemed to understand why this was happening... we kept working on the problem until finally one of the techs at Dillon got on the phone pointed out 357SIG uses a different diameter flash hole than most case... they sent some new pins that were for use with the 357SIG and the problem went away... The point here is Dillon will work with you until the problem is identified and fixed.

I recommend calling Dillon... I don't think you will be disappointed.

V/r

CHuck


Hoist on High the Bonny Blue Flag that Bears the Single Star!!!

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Posts: 1272 | Location: Florida, CSA | Registered: September 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by cxm:
I have been reloading about 60 years now... based on that experience I have to agree the first step, anytime I have a problem with my Dillon equipment is a phone call to Dillon... They have never failed to patiently work with me to sort out the problem... no matter how difficult it is.

A few years ago I started reloading for 357SIG. All was well but I started breaking de-priming pins... I used up my spares in short order. I called Dillon and no one seemed to understand why this was happening... we kept working on the problem until finally one of the techs at Dillon got on the phone pointed out 357SIG uses a different diameter flash hole than most case... they sent some new pins that were for use with the 357SIG and the problem went away... The point here is Dillon will work with you until the problem is identified and fixed.

I recommend calling Dillon... I don't think you will be disappointed.

V/r

CHuck


I had this issue also. It was with older Speer nickel cases, Dillon will offer a modified decapper pin for those with this issue.
 
Posts: 891 | Location: hampton roads, va. | Registered: October 03, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I lube cases when resizing, even in carbide dies.

Everything wears. Carbide is harder than brass, but it still wears. The lube makes resizing easier, but it's also about minimizing wear on the equipment.
 
Posts: 2612 | Registered: September 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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