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The Rising Sun, by John Toland. It's a two volume set about the War in the Pacific and a lot of it is from the Japanese viewpoint of the War and their actions that sometimes could be strange.
 
Posts: 3522 | Registered: November 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
goodheart
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I want to thank folks here who recommended A Higher Calling. A very different kind of book about WW II, I'm well into it and looking forward to following the story to the end.


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Posts: 12883 | Location: One hop from Paradise | Registered: July 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So many of the books mentioned here are worth reading, and in fact, I've read a surprisingly large number of them myself, and more that haven't been mentioned such as Patton's autobiography.

Three that stand out are personal I-Was-There stories:

Guadalcanal Diary by Richard Tregaskis, written from notes he took while actually on the island from the first day of the invasion.

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo by Ted Lawson.

Baa Baa Black Sheep by Greg Boyington.


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Posts: 6980 | Location: Illinois farm country | Registered: November 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you can find a copy, "Hitler's Battleships" is a great read. Battleship Scharnhorst is another.
 
Posts: 4227 | Location: Middletown, PA | Registered: January 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
goodheart
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Just finished A Higher Calling...stayed up too late!
Now I see a B-17 (Liberty Foundation) will be out at Gillespie Field this week, giving rides this weekend.


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Posts: 12883 | Location: One hop from Paradise | Registered: July 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Run Silent Run Deep, Edward L. Beach.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by sjtill:
Just finished A Higher Calling...stayed up too late!
Now I see a B-17 (Liberty Foundation) will be out at Gillespie Field this week, giving rides this weekend.


Even if you can't pony up the money (~$450-500?) for a ride, they still might let you walk through the aircraft. When the Collins Foundation came to my home town, for $10 (IIRC) I was able to walk through a B-17 and a B-24, and ogle their B-25 and P-51B. . .



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Posts: 19607 | Location: Hobbiton, The Shire, Middle Earth | Registered: September 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Read some of the books David Howarth wrote about
WW11.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Armine_Howarth

This message has been edited. Last edited by: cyberphobia,


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Posts: 1861 | Location: Ft Myers Florida | Registered: November 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Armed and Gregarious
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quote:
Originally posted by cyberphobia:
Read some of the books David Howarth wrote about
WW 11.
World War Eleven? How did I miss all the information about World Wars III through X?


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Posts: 11863 | Location: Nomad | Registered: January 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'd recommend this one.



His book about the fall of Berlin was also pretty good.

-Tom


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Quite!
quote:
Originally posted by DMF:
quote:
Originally posted by cyberphobia:
Read some of the books David Howarth wrote about
WW 11.
World War Eleven? How did I miss all the information about World Wars III through X?


"Advertising is the art of convincing people to spend money they don't have for something they don't need"

Will Rogers

SIG 226R Elite SAO
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Dan Wesson CBOB .45
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Posts: 1861 | Location: Ft Myers Florida | Registered: November 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
Lemme see here... I've read a ton of WW2 books, and these are the ones that come to mind.


Memoirs:

Soldat and The Forgotten Solider, which you've already read, were excellent choices.

With The Old Breed - Eugene Sledge (USMC mortarman in the Pacific)

Sniper on the Eastern Front - Sepp Allerberger/Albrecht Wacker (German sniper in Russia)

Panzer Commander - Hans Von Luck (German tank officer in France, North Africa, and Russia)

Company Commander - Charles MacDonald (US Army infantry officer in Europe)

Few Returned - Eugenio Corti (Italian Army officer in Russia; unfortunately the sequel - The Last Soldiers of the King - wasn't nearly as good...)

Death Traps - Belton Cooper (US Army armored division maintenance officer in Europe)

And No Birds Sang - Farley Mowat (Canadian infantry officer in Italy)

Bugles and a Tiger/The Road Past Mandalay - John Masters (British officer with the Ghurkas in Southeast Asia)

Defeat Into Victory - William Slim (British general rebuilding British forces in Southeast Asia)


WW2 nonfiction:

Anything by Anthony Beevor

Anything by Max Hastings

Anything by Stephen Ambrose (You've already read Citizen Soldiers)

The Liberation Trilogy - Rick Atkinson (excellent 3-volume overview of the US military in North Africa, Italy, and Europe from 1942-1945)


WW2 Fiction:

War of the Rats - Daniel Robbins (fictional take on the fighting in Stalingrad, especially a German/Soviet sniper duel; served as the basis for the film "Enemy at the Gates")

Killing Rommel - Steven Pressfield (fictional take on the British Long Range Desert Group/SAS in North Africa)


I want to thank you for your recommendation of "Death Traps". It was a great book.


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Posts: 1214 | Location: Arkansas | Registered: November 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I mentioned this book in one of the "What are you reading now?" threads.

"The Perfect Horse," Elizabeth Letts

Little known true story about an American Army mission in the closing days of WWII to rescue the Royal Lipizzaners. The Nazis had stockpiled eastern Europe's finest purebreds, including the 3 lines of Lipizzaners and Poland's Arabians, to breed an equine master race.

The American officer involved was the commander of mounted cavalry at Fort Riley as late as 1943. He took command of a mechanized unit that drove into southern Germany at the end of the War. I'm about 2/3 through it and it's a compelling story.


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Posts: 6292 | Location: Wyoming | Registered: January 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Fatal Crossroads by Danny Parker


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Posts: 307 | Location: Wisconsin | Registered: December 14, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by CPD SIG:
W E B Grifith, (or Griffin) has a great non fiction series, "The Corps". Marines in WWII.


I second that and would add W E B Griffin's series called "Brotherhood of War" Army in WWII.

Both will keep you busy for a week or so.
Mike



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Posts: 1040 | Location: Kalispell Montana & South for the Winter | Registered: December 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Probably a change of pace from most recommendations here, but a great novel about the time leading up to WWII at Pearl Harbor: From Here To Eternity, by James Jones.
 
Posts: 1582 | Registered: November 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway. Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully. Great writing about what was probably the most pivotal naval battle of the Pacific.


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Posts: 464 | Location: T-town in the 253 | Registered: January 16, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The books that I would recommend are already posted. For the uncommon, the Sherman tank in use in the Red Army.

http://www.historynet.com/book...s-f-gebhardt-ww2.htm


"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye". The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupery, pilot and author, lost on mission, July 1944, Med Theatre.
 
Posts: 3900 | Location: Central Texas | Registered: September 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Another recommendation for Shattered Sword and Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors. These two are probably the best I have read.

Three others:
Thunder Below: Eugene Flucky - this is the story of the USS Barb a WW2 Fleet sub. A really good read.
Neptune's Inferno: Hornfischer - the US Navy at Guadalcanal. Great reading about the battles in the Slot.
At Dawn We Slept: Goldstein - the first history written about the Pearl Harbor attack. It is older but a classic.

Don
 
Posts: 9 | Registered: October 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One of my favorite first person WW II books:
Return of the Enola Gay by Paul W. Tibbets

I bought my book at a signing in Las Vegas in 1999. I met and shook hands with Brigadier General (ret.)
Paul Tibbets (pilot) and Colonel (ret.) Thomas W. Ferebee (bombadier), they signed my copy.

RIP


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