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Picture of rainman64
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D.O.A. with Edmond O'Brien.

I enjoyed the premise, and thought it was unique.

Big Sleep is also on my list.

Also Orson Welles A touch of Evil.
Fritz Lang's Scarlett Street.

Would Strangers on a Train qualify?


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Posts: 4465 | Location: Dallas, TX | Registered: April 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Pyker
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I'm wondering whether Paths of Glory could sneak into the genre, it has almost all the requirements except a femme fatale, but isn't strictly speaking, a 'whodunnit', but more of a 'whydunnit'.
 
Posts: 175 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: September 06, 2019Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of parabellum
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Originally posted by Pyker:
I'm wondering whether Paths of Glory could sneak into the genre, it has almost all the requirements except a femme fatale, but isn't strictly speaking, a 'whodunnit', but more of a 'whydunnit'.
Well, if you want film noir from Kubrick, you have to look at his early films- Killer's Kiss and epecially The Killing, but with Paths of Glory, Stanley Kubrick became Stanley Kubrick the auteur, and just as with Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train, the unique syle of these auteurs trumps all. Strangers on a Train would be film noir if made by any other director at that time, but Strangers on a Train is not film noir- it's Hitchcock. That's the style of the film, and film noir is not a genre, it is a style- an overlay, an atmosphere.

I think you would be hard-pressed to find many film buffs who consider Paths of Glory to be film noir, for two reasons- first, it's a Kubrick film, and the style of Kubrick films is Kubrick, just as the style of all Hitchcock films is Hitchcock. Again- auteurs
Secondly, while Paths of Glory does fall within the time frame of American film noir and while the film does possess Borde and Chaumeton's "unusual and cruel atmosphere", Paths of Glory is obviously a war film, but more to the point, it's an anti-war film. The atmosphere of the film is not an overlay as you would find in other films noir, which take place in night clubs and living rooms. The "unusual and cruel" atmosphere is an unavoidable product of the utter madness of trench warfare and antiquated battle strategies combined with advanced war technologies, which resulted in the complete slaughter of millions of men.

To me, though, there are only two film genres which cannot be done in the film noir style- musicals and comedies, so, all of the above is not to say there are not war films done in the film noir style, but they are uncommon in that genre.
 
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Picture of Pyker
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That's good reasoning indeed, but to me it's still 'noirish' in style even if not actual part of the genre, although I do take your point about it being actually 'Kubrickesque' rather than Noir.

The camera work and lighting is just so enthralling, much like that in some of Widmark's and Cagney's early films.

Good chat, thanks.
 
Posts: 175 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: September 06, 2019Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by houndawg:
Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid


Damn, you beat me to it!




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Posts: 22848 | Location: Gainesville, GA | Registered: October 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by TMats:
Last night I watched The Big Sleep once again; I think I’m beginning to follow the plot Wink. Shugart brought up Elisha Cook Jr. in this tread, I also admire his work (thinking especially of his important role in Shane). I still feel like a sophomore, another year later, in para’s school of Film Noir. I can see that this movie is probably not among the best in Film Noir, but for me, it’s one of the most enjoyable (easiest?) to watch. Perhaps it’s Bogart and Bacall, perhaps it’s the dialogue between B&B, the detective story clever lines...I don’t know, I just like it. Hey, maybe it’s the ‘38 Plymouth business coupe that Bogart drives.

ETA: This Saturday afternoon (Nov. 9), TCM is again showing The Big Sleep. Ironically, in light of my comment about Elisha Cook Jr., Shane immediately follows. Please excuse the short deviation from topic, but Shane remains my favorite Western, and among my favorite movies of any genre. So many reasons.


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Posts: 5987 | Location: Livingston County Michigan USA | Registered: August 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Watched "Detective Story" (1951) last night.

Lee Grant as the shoplifter was brilliant. Of course, we all know what happened to her career in the early '50's.


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