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I dusted off my copy and viewed "The Wages of Fear" last night. 1953. French with English sub.

Was close to $40 for the Criterion DVD when I bought it some 10 years ago, but worth it IMO.


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"Never have sympathy for insurance companies...the sons of bitches don't deserve it." - Attorney friend.
 
Posts: 6809 | Location: Arizona | Registered: August 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Still finding my way
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This thread is amazing!
I've always been drawn to this style of film albeit in more modern movies such as Bladerunner, Payback, etc. I'll be taking notes and hopefully watch a few of the movies you guys have listed here as your favorites keeping in mind Para's criteria for what true film noir is.
Also, thanks Para for taking the time type up such great explanations and sharing your thoughts on this.
 
Posts: 8278 | Registered: January 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Ryanp225:
This thread is amazing!
I've always been drawn to this style of film albeit in more modern movies such as Bladerunner, Payback, etc. I'll be taking notes and hopefully watch a few of the movies you guys have listed here as your favorites keeping in mind Para's criteria for what true film noir is.
Also, thanks Para for taking the time type up such great explanations and sharing your thoughts on this.


If you have a Video rental store nearby, check out the DVD's for rent titles as mentioned in this thread. Another source is your local Library. Many finds can be found there and loaned out.

Another source is a used video (DVD/VCR) movies outlet.


*********
"Never have sympathy for insurance companies...the sons of bitches don't deserve it." - Attorney friend.
 
Posts: 6809 | Location: Arizona | Registered: August 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Ignored facts
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I'm about half way through Sunset Boulevard. Awesome film so far, but I must say, the style and in particular the narration reminds me of the old Twilight Zone TV series. There must be a reason for that, and I've just not made the connection yet, other than they are from the same period of time.


.
 
Posts: 8083 | Location: The Beaver State | Registered: February 28, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Para’s thread about Nightmare Alley reminded me that Edgar G. Ulmer’s film noir masterpiece Detour is now available from The Criterion Collection. They have fully restored this great film and it’s my understanding that it will even see a limited run at theaters around the country.
 
Posts: 409 | Registered: June 15, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Gotta be 'The Asphalt Jungle' (1950), just a brilliant work. Sterling Hayden was never better (except maybe for 'The Killing'), Sam Jaffe is the film's soul and James Whitmore is just wonderfully pathetic as a loyal, bitter crook you can root for.

Frankly, there's too many to choose from, but every time this one's on, I watch 'til the end.


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"Just A Wild Eyed Texan On a Manhunt For The World's Most Perfect Chili Dog...."
 
Posts: 674 | Location: Austin, Texas | Registered: June 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
always with a hat or sunscreen
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quote:
Originally posted by Orguss:
Dark City


Just watched it this morning. Hadn't viewed it in over a decade. Still a very strange movie. Smile Jennifer Connelly does a great job. Sutherland and Hurt too.



Certifiable member of the gun toting, septuagenarian, bucket list workin', crazed retiree, bald is beautiful club!
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Posts: 10012 | Location: Black Hills of South Dakota | Registered: June 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Peace through
superior firepower
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That's not the Dark City he's referring to. He means this 1950 Charlton Heston film. If he means the 1998 film of the same name, that's not film noir, for a couple of reasons.

The 1950 film is currently not being broadcast by any outlet I know of. Last time I saw Dark City, it was probably 15 years ago on AMC, before they went to a commercial format.


____________________________________________________

"The world's in a bad way, my man,
And bound to be worse before it mends;
Better lie up in the mountain here
Four or five centuries,
While the stars go over the lonely ocean"
- Robinson Jeffers
 
Posts: 88080 | Registered: January 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Key Largo
The Lady from Shanghai
Blue Dahlia
Dark Passage, my personal favorite.



If we ever forget that we are One Nation Under God, then we will be a nation gone under. Ronald Reagan
 
Posts: 987 | Location: Arizona | Registered: December 07, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
always with a hat or sunscreen
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quote:
Originally posted by parabellum:
That's not the Dark City he's referring to. He means this 1950 Charlton Heston film. If he means the 1998 film of the same name, that's not film noir, for a couple of reasons.

The 1950 film is currently not being broadcast by any outlet I know of. Last time I saw Dark City, it was probably 15 years ago on AMC, before they went to a commercial format.


Ah...oh well. The 1998 film has been described as a neo-noir sci-fi flick so I thought it was the same one Orguss was citing.



Certifiable member of the gun toting, septuagenarian, bucket list workin', crazed retiree, bald is beautiful club!
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Posts: 10012 | Location: Black Hills of South Dakota | Registered: June 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm bumping this thread because sitting in front of me, courtesy my local library, is a DVD of The Third Man.

My interest in this movie was sparked by a trip I just returned from to Vienna, Austria. I lived in Vienna as a child, but never knew the city. So I went back to learn about it.

I learned that the movie is still so highly regarded in Vienna that an entire museum is devoted to it, as is a city park. I find it amazing that seventy years after its production, it is still considered one of the masterpieces of British cinema.

Oddly enough, while it was the most popular box office smash in Britain on its release, the Austrians gave it a cool reception. It has consistently been rated in the top British films.

Never having seen the movie, and having just learned about its high valuation not only as a film noir epic, but as a classic movie in general, I felt I had to see it. I will be watching it either tonight or tomorrow.

Thanks for all the comments on the meaning of film noir.




Don't believe everything you think.

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Posts: 1740 | Location: Virginia, USA | Registered: December 04, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fpuhan:
I'm bumping this thread because sitting in front of me, courtesy my local library, is a DVD of The Third Man.

My interest in this movie was sparked by a trip I just returned from to Vienna, Austria. I lived in Vienna as a child, but never knew the city. So I went back to learn about it.

I learned that the movie is still so highly regarded in Vienna that an entire museum is devoted to it, as is a city park. I find it amazing that seventy years after its production, it is still considered one of the masterpieces of British cinema.

Oddly enough, while it was the most popular box office smash in Britain on its release, the Austrians gave it a cool reception. It has consistently been rated in the top British films.

Never having seen the movie, and having just learned about its high valuation not only as a film noir epic, but as a classic movie in general, I felt I had to see it. I will be watching it either tonight or tomorrow.

Thanks for all the comments on the meaning of film noir.


Two versions of that film. The release for the American audience deleted the "Stripper dance" appearance in the bar.

British version had it along with Carol Reed narration at film beginning.

DVD to find is the making of "The Third Man". Interesting story behind the film's actors, Zitter music and Vienna following WWII.


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"Never have sympathy for insurance companies...the sons of bitches don't deserve it." - Attorney friend.
 
Posts: 6809 | Location: Arizona | Registered: August 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rumble Fish



Don't count me out till you see the box go in the hole!


 
Posts: 2094 | Location: N.E. OHIO | Registered: July 05, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Man Once
Child Twice
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How about Odds against Tommorrow?
Laura is playing in the next few days on TCM.
 
Posts: 10136 | Location: NE OHIO | Registered: October 22, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Sigfest:
How about Odds against Tommorrow?
See my comments on the previous page of this thread
quote:
The end marker for film noir is specified as Robert Wise's Odds Against Tomorrow from 1959, or Welles' Touch of Evil from 1958. Looking at Welles film, one can easily see the self-consciousness of the style. Wise's film? Well, look at that opening title sequence. That Saul Bass title sequence belongs to the next decade- the 1960s, and not the 1950s.
Witness the preoccupation of the film with race relations. 1959 was on the cusp of "The New Frontier". Film noir did not disappear, but it either morphed into something else (Odds Against Tomorrow) , or it became self-parody (Touch of Evil).
 
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Love Gene Tierney. Always interesting to see Vincent Price BEFORE all those horror films.


I shall never forget the weekend Laura died. A silver sun burned through the sky like a huge magnifying glass. It was the hottest Sunday in my recollection. ... And I had just begun to write Laura's story when - another of those detectives came to see me.
 
Posts: 6388 | Location: MS GULF COAST | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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