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A Bridge Too Far (1977), directed by Richard Attenborough on Netflix Login/Join 
A man's got to know
his limitations
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quote:
Originally posted by Johnny 3eagles:
Slight thread drift, but totally related to Operation Market Garden.

When I returned from Viet Nam in 1967, I was assigned to the Recon Platoon of a Tank Battalion in the 2nd Armored Division. There were only 4 of us in the Recon Platoon as the Battalion was starting to reorganize coming out of Administrative Storage (in caretaker status). Our Platoon started staffing up with troops straight out of Scout training and it was our job to begin Small Unit Training with the new guys. One of the new guys was actually an OLD E-4 (Spec 4). His first name was Ivan (leaving out his last name) and we called him Pops (he was older than all of us).

As our training was coming to a close and the "new" guys were ready to ship to units heading to Viet Nam, we had our Annual General Inspection. On the day of our In Ranks Inspection, we were all lined up nice and pretty in our freshly starched Khaki uniforms. The Division Commander was doing his walk through of each platoon when he came to a screeching halt in front of Pop. "Soldier, why are you wearing two stars in your jump wings?" Sir, I jumped with the 82nd Airborne in Sicily and Holland during World War Two. The freaking General about passed out.

True Story. Ivan was in Operation Market Garden. And, he got shipped off to Viet Nam in one of the Infantry Battalions in the 2nd Armored Division.

Sorry for the long thread drift. I've been waiting for years to tell this story here.
.
That's a cool story , Johnny 3eagles thanks for sharing.



"But, as luck would have it, he stood up. He caught that chunk of lead." Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock
 
Posts: 8509 | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by hberttmank:
quote:
Originally posted by Johnny 3eagles:
Slight thread drift, but totally related to Operation Market Garden.

When I returned from Viet Nam in 1967, I was assigned to the Recon Platoon of a Tank Battalion in the 2nd Armored Division. There were only 4 of us in the Recon Platoon as the Battalion was starting to reorganize coming out of Administrative Storage (in caretaker status). Our Platoon started staffing up with troops straight out of Scout training and it was our job to begin Small Unit Training with the new guys. One of the new guys was actually an OLD E-4 (Spec 4). His first name was Ivan (leaving out his last name) and we called him Pops (he was older than all of us).

As our training was coming to a close and the "new" guys were ready to ship to units heading to Viet Nam, we had our Annual General Inspection. On the day of our In Ranks Inspection, we were all lined up nice and pretty in our freshly starched Khaki uniforms. The Division Commander was doing his walk through of each platoon when he came to a screeching halt in front of Pop. "Soldier, why are you wearing two stars in your jump wings?" Sir, I jumped with the 82nd Airborne in Sicily and Holland during World War Two. The freaking General about passed out.

True Story. Ivan was in Operation Market Garden. And, he got shipped off to Viet Nam in one of the Infantry Battalions in the 2nd Armored Division.

Sorry for the long thread drift. I've been waiting for years to tell this story here.
.
That's a cool story , Johnny 3eagles thanks for sharing.


Sicily drop was in 1943 so "Pops" was a minimum of 42yoa in 1967 - and still an E-4. Must have had an interesting service record.


We often meet our destiny on the road we took to avoid it.
 
Posts: 2058 | Location: W. Central NH | Registered: October 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bookers Bourbon
and a good cigar
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Ivan was born in 1919. After WWII, got out of the Army as a Sergeant. He told us he had worked as a newspaper editor. Exactly when he reentered the Army I don't know. After he left our unit for a unit headed to Vietnam I lost track of him as I left for W. Germany. I do not know if he went to Vietnam with that unit or not. He died in 1979, his grave stone only lists his WWII service. He is buried in West Virginia. He may have succumbed to his favorite morning pick-me-up, Vodka in a brown paper bag.



“Fate whispers to the warrior, 'You can not withstand the storm.'
The warrior whispers back, 'I AM THE STORM."


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Posts: 5212 | Location: Arkansas  | Registered: November 06, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Charmingly unsophisticated
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Do you know where in WV?


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Posts: 15661 | Location: Cross Lanes, WV | Registered: February 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bookers Bourbon
and a good cigar
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Yes, however, if you send me an email, I will reply. I am uncomfortable posting his last name publicly. His parents and six siblings are deceased but I am not sure about a wife or children. Hit me up.



“Fate whispers to the warrior, 'You can not withstand the storm.'
The warrior whispers back, 'I AM THE STORM."


NRA ENDOWMENT LIFE MEMBER
 
Posts: 5212 | Location: Arkansas  | Registered: November 06, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Johnny 3eagles, thank you for sharing that fantastic story. ABTF has been one of my favorites for many years.

WJR
 
Posts: 1786 | Location: Birmingham, AL USA | Registered: January 23, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just watched it the other day. It was interesting,although I am not sure how accurate, at how many slip ups there were from the radios not working due to wrong parts/pieces, drop zones,etc.. Of course nobody really had any prior experience with this type of warfare prior and a lot of things were learned, just as in today's arenas.
 
Posts: 5284 | Location: Treasure Coast,Fl. | Registered: July 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by patw:
...Of course nobody really had any prior experience with this type of warfare prior and a lot of things were learned, just as in today's arenas.


I've read a couple books on the battle, and what stands out is that 1) This was Montgomery's idea (on short notice) and 2) Success required every moving part to work perfectly.
 
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Originally posted by Sigmund:

I've read a couple books on the battle, and what stands out is that 1) This was Montgomery's idea (on short notice) and 2) Success required every moving part to work perfectly.


Monty always had a HUGE chip on his shoulder because Ike rather than he had been made Supreme Commander for Europe regardless of Monty's success against an under-supplied Rommel in North Africa.

FDR reminded Churchill of how many more men and how much more material the US was providing so Ike prevailed.

He finally had to throw Monty a bone, though, so he let him plan and execute the attempted end run through Holland that was Market Garden in order to get to the tank country of the North German Plain - bypassing the Siegfried Line, Ardennes and Huertgen Forest. We all know the result.


We often meet our destiny on the road we took to avoid it.
 
Posts: 2058 | Location: W. Central NH | Registered: October 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you've got 40-minutes, this is a interesting review along with some interesting positions of the producers. Mission-wise, there was too many single-points of failure, it should've been scrapped but, political pressure overwhelmed rational decision making.

 
Posts: 10338 | Location: Wine Country | Registered: September 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by corsair:
If you've got 40-minutes, this is a interesting review along with some interesting positions of the producers. Mission-wise, there was too many single-points of failure, it should've been scrapped but, political pressure overwhelmed rational decision making.

[FLASH_VIDEO]<iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PjbEdZyEiMA" width="560"></iframe>[/FLASH_VIDEO]


I'll have to find time to watch it. Does it mention the fact that the offensive's failure just created a dead end salient and the city of Arnhem was not liberated until April 1945?


We often meet our destiny on the road we took to avoid it.
 
Posts: 2058 | Location: W. Central NH | Registered: October 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Husband, Father, Aggie,
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I saw this as a kid in the theater at Almeda Mall back in '77 with my dad.
Vietnam was still pretty fresh for him but he took me.
He always said the WWII guys had it tougher than he did, as the Germans had equally if not superior firepower, weapons etc.
He always respected the WWII guys.


HK Ag
 
Posts: 2676 | Location: Tomball, Texas | Registered: August 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Yeah, that M14 video guy...
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Watched it this weekend. Anyone spot John Ratzenberger (Cliff Clavin)? I had to backup and watch the scene a second time to confirm it.

Tony.


Owner, TonyBen, LLC, Type-01 FFL
www.tonybenm14.com (Site under construction).
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Posts: 3875 | Location: USA | Registered: February 13, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Go ahead punk, make my day
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Great great flick. Must have watched this 20+ times as a child; the only limit was we never had it on VHS so you were limited by catching it on TV.
 
Posts: 45786 | Registered: July 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Angry Korean
with a Dark Soul
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quote:
Originally posted by benny6:
Watched it this weekend. Anyone spot John Ratzenberger (Cliff Clavin)? I had to backup and watch the scene a second time to confirm it.

Tony.


Indeed. He played Lt. James Megellas. An odd choice by the film maker was that Lt. Megallas is depicted as being killed during the river crossing, when in real life, he survived the river crossing, and went on to perform his duties in extraordinary fashion. He was awarded Distinguished Service Cross, 2 Silver Stars, 2 Bronze Stars, and 2 Purple Hearts, and was nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor.

He sadly passed away in April 2020. At 103, though, I have to say, he had a good run.
 
Posts: 1005 | Location: Orange County, CA | Registered: October 11, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I didn't know that Ratzenberger was playing a specific officer. I've got a copy of Megallas's book "All the Way to Berlin" inscribed with a personal note from the author.
 
Posts: 507 | Registered: January 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Angry Korean
with a Dark Soul
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You're right that the official credits show Ratzenberger as portraying a US Lieutenant. I found the information linking Lt. Colonel Megellas to the actor portrayal in the articles in memoriam upon his death.

https://www.thetachi.org/in-me...lta-omega-ripon-1942

Google search showed a couple of separate articles making the same claim. And Wikipedia, which of course is not the most reliable of sources.
 
Posts: 1005 | Location: Orange County, CA | Registered: October 11, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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