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I knew I shouldn't have opened this thread.
I just mailed out an order for one of these Smile

Thanks!

Bruce



Hanlon's Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

"It is better to be considered a house cat and sit on the lap of pretty girls than to be feared as a tiger and hunted by men."- T. Takamatsu
 
Posts: 2414 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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She came today!
Someone show me how to upload some pics! Smile

Bruce



Hanlon's Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

"It is better to be considered a house cat and sit on the lap of pretty girls than to be feared as a tiger and hunted by men."- T. Takamatsu
 
Posts: 2414 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Avoiding
slam fires
Picture of 45 Cal
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quote:
Originally posted by RNshooter:
She came today!
Someone show me how to upload some pics! Smile

Bruce


That seems pretty fast turnaround,
What are the chamber and muzzle #'s and rack grade did you get.
 
Posts: 21133 | Location: Georgia | Registered: February 19, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Staring back
from the abyss
Picture of Gustofer
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quote:
Originally posted by steel96:
For ammo, you need to use ammo specific for use in an M1 Garand.

I shot standard Remington '06 ammo out of mine for years without any problems.

The biggest gun related regret that I have is selling that rifle. But, at the time, it was either pay the rent or keep the rifle.


________________________________________________________

"How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy." Winston Churchill
 
Posts: 13141 | Location: Montana | Registered: November 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:

That seems pretty fast turnaround,
What are the chamber and muzzle #'s and rack grade did you get.


Service Grade. 1+ muzzle. 2 throat.

Bruce



Hanlon's Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

"It is better to be considered a house cat and sit on the lap of pretty girls than to be feared as a tiger and hunted by men."- T. Takamatsu
 
Posts: 2414 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Gustofer:
quote:
Originally posted by steel96:
For ammo, you need to use ammo specific for use in an M1 Garand.

I shot standard Remington '06 ammo out of mine for years without any problems.



That doesn't mean it was the correct ammunition, rather it's luck and a testament to the strength of the action of the rifle that nothing untoward happened.

steel96 - The civilian '30-06 rounds will make a higher pressure than what the Garand was designed for which makes for greater wear and tear, and possible catastrophic failure. Here's this from the Lyman Reloading Handbook, 49th ed. -

While the 30-06 is an extremely flexible cartridge, shooters loading for the M1 Garand must follow certain precautions. The Garand's gas system is designed around military issue ammunition with bullets usually weighing either 152 or 173-grains. Garand shooters should stick with spitzer bullets weighing between 150 to 168-grains. Round nosed bullets may not feed properly through the M1's mechanism. Moreover, the use of heavier bullets can eventually damage the rifle's operating system. Shooters reloading military cases should keep maximum loads one to two grains below those listed here. Cases should be full-length sized for proper functioning as in any semiautomatic rifle.

If you do want to shoot the higher pressure civilian rounds, it would be a good idea to get an adjustable gas plug for your Garand. Earlier in this thread I posted links to a few different types of gas plugs.




 
Posts: 3698 | Location: Arkansas | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hop head
Picture of lyman
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by marksman41:
quote:
Originally posted by Gustofer:
quote:
Originally posted by steel96:
For ammo, you need to use ammo specific for use in an M1 Garand.

I shot standard Remington '06 ammo out of mine for years without any problems.





That doesn't mean it was the correct ammunition, rather it's luck and a testament to the strength of the action of the rifle that nothing untoward happened.

steel96 - The civilian '30-06 rounds will make a higher pressure than what the Garand was designed for which makes for greater wear and tear, and possible catastrophic failure. Here's this from the Lyman Reloading Handbook, 49th ed. -

While the 30-06 is an extremely flexible cartridge, shooters loading for the M1 Garand must follow certain precautions. The Garand's gas system is designed around military issue ammunition with bullets usually weighing either 152 or 173-grains. Garand shooters should stick with spitzer bullets weighing between 150 to 168-grains. Round nosed bullets may not feed properly through the M1's mechanism. Moreover, the use of heavier bullets can eventually damage the rifle's operating system. Shooters reloading military cases should keep maximum loads one to two grains below those listed here. Cases should be full-length sized for proper functioning as in any semiautomatic rifle.

If you do want to shoot the higher pressure civilian rounds, it would be a good idea to get an adjustable gas plug for your Garand. Earlier in this thread I posted links to a few different types of gas plugs.



not the action that one needs to worry about,

the gun will shot any 3006 single shot,

it is the pressure curve of the powder that will eventually affect the op rod, as in possibly bending it, or working the action too fast,



www.chesterfieldarmament.com
 
Posts: 5941 | Location: Beach VA,not VA Beach | Registered: July 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If there is no note on the tag about barrel date,does that mean the barrel is original? Mine is a SA in the 4,000,000 serial number range so I believe that makes it a '53?

I'll upload some pics as soon as I figure out how.

Bruce



Hanlon's Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

"It is better to be considered a house cat and sit on the lap of pretty girls than to be feared as a tiger and hunted by men."- T. Takamatsu
 
Posts: 2414 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
Picture of RogueJSK
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quote:
Originally posted by RNshooter:
If there is no note on the tag about barrel date,does that mean the barrel is original?


Not necessarily.

You can check the barrel date yourself. Pull the op rod all the way to the rear until it locks open. Then look in the gap between the lower handguard and the stock. The barrel should be marked inside that area with a maker, drawing number, date (month and year), and heat lot number.

For example, the below barrel was made by Springfield Armory in November 1954.

 
Posts: 19007 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Barrel says: "SA F6535448 12 53 A208B"
Sounds like this one is original?

Bruce



Hanlon's Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

"It is better to be considered a house cat and sit on the lap of pretty girls than to be feared as a tiger and hunted by men."- T. Takamatsu
 
Posts: 2414 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is the Scott Duff book the best reference for post-WWII Garands? I want to learn more about my rifle.

Bruce



Hanlon's Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

"It is better to be considered a house cat and sit on the lap of pretty girls than to be feared as a tiger and hunted by men."- T. Takamatsu
 
Posts: 2414 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
fugitive from reality
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Bruce Canfield has a really good book on the M1 rifle. Scott Duff has two books out there, a red one and a blue one. Together they cover pre/during/post WWII.


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Posts: 5319 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
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One or both of Duff's two book set - the Red Book (pre-WW2/WW2) and Blue Book (post-WW2) - is potentially a better choice for a beginner. They're smaller and more accessible, but still have lots of good info.

Canfield's tome is a better book from a purely informational standpoint, being more comprehensive and having the most info, but it's huge and might be intimidating for a beginner.

Whichever history book(s) you go with, you'll also want to invest in Duff's Green Book - The M1 Garand Owner's Guide. It isn't so much about the history of the rifle, but instead goes into detail on things like disassembly, sighting-in, cleaning, lubrication, malfunctions, etc.
 
Posts: 19007 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hop head
Picture of lyman
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
One or both of Duff's two book set - the Red Book (pre-WW2/WW2) and Blue Book (post-WW2) - is potentially a better choice for a beginner. They're smaller and more accessible, but still have lots of good info.

Canfield's tome is a better book from a purely informational standpoint, being more comprehensive and having the most info, but it's huge and might be intimidating for a beginner.

Whichever history book(s) you go with, you'll also want to invest in Duff's Green Book - The M1 Garand Owner's Guide. It isn't so much about the history of the rifle, but instead goes into detail on things like disassembly, sighting-in, cleaning, lubrication, malfunctions, etc.


add Hatcher's Book of the Garand to that list to round it out



www.chesterfieldarmament.com
 
Posts: 5941 | Location: Beach VA,not VA Beach | Registered: July 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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