SIGforum.com    Main Page  Hop To Forum Categories  Mason's Rifle Room    What will scopesights of the future look like?
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
What will scopesights of the future look like? Login/Join 
Freethinker
Picture of sigfreund
posted
The two below comments in another thread started me thinking about this question.

quote:
Originally posted by fritz:
I can hardly wait for what the next decade brings.


When I asked what that might be, KenS responded:

quote:
Originally posted by KenS:
Not an expert, but a guy interested in nanotech advancements. You might want to look into GRIN technology to glimpse what may lie in the future.


I found several articles and sites about GRIN (gradient refractive index) lenses, and most referred to the ability to use the technology to make extremely small lenses.

This one, however, referenced making binoculars with GRIN lenses that would be much lighter and would offer improved optical quality. That piece, however, seemed to be about possibilities, not something that’s been done yet. But if the technology can be used in binocular lenses, there should be no reason it couldn’t be used to make scopesights that have less complex lens elements, and therefore lighter and perhaps brighter for a particular objective lens size than current methods.

But I’m curious what the membership thinks other advances in scopesight technology might be.




“The terror of the Roman arms added weight and dignity to the moderation of the emperors. They preserved peace by a constant preparation for war; and while justice regulated their conduct, they announced to the nations on their confines, that they were as little disposed to endure, as to offer an injury.”
— Edward Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
 
Posts: 40598 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Go ahead punk, make my day
posted Hide Post
I think integrated LRF tech with dynamic BDC as part of the optic.

You are already on target, lase, the scope does the dope and you update hold and fire.
 
Posts: 43773 | Registered: July 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RHINOWSO:
I think integrated LRF tech with dynamic BDC as part of the optic.

You are already on target, lase, the scope does the dope and you update hold and fire.


Since this is already proven tech now, I agree that this will become much more common. Kinda like Aimpoint with their crazy battery life, rugged RDS.

Now there are many "budget" options that are rugged with 50k hours like Primary Arms, Vortex, Sig etc. At the start of the market there was just Aimpoint (and EOTech, but not with the battery life)...and junk.




“People have to really suffer before they can risk doing what they love.” –Chuck Palahnuik

The world's a dangerous place, we can help! http://portlandfirearmtraining.com/
 
Posts: 4636 | Location: Oregon | Registered: October 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RHINOWSO:
I think integrated LRF tech with dynamic BDC as part of the optic.

You are already on target, lase, the scope does the dope and you update hold and fire.

I agree that this will likely become more common. In a perfect world the best scope's features may include:
- Highly accurate LRF. Along the lines of the best LRF binos -- say Swaro and Leica. Maybe even Vectronix accuracy.
- Really clear glass, ED quality at a minimum.
- Ballistics integration. Maybe JBM quality, hopefully with the ability to tailor the ballistics for individual cartridges and atmospheric conditions.
- Multiple styles of reticles, which are integrated with the ballistics. Could be Christmas tree, could be circle-dot, could be more traditional X-Y axis.
- Illumination of aiming point, based on ballistics.

Regardless of cost, distributor, or manufacturing location, I expect glass to be become clearer. Contrary to what many people want to believe, even China can produce some pretty good glass. Other developing countries will likely enter the glass business, too.

ED glass may be just be a stepping stone to better optics. Maybe flourite glass. Maybe some other form of uber-low-dispersion glass. Maybe polycarbonate instead of glass.

More robust scopes are likely, as long as shooters are willing to pay for such quality. Elevation turrets that survive years of dialing up and down. Larger scope tubes, with more elevation dialing capabilities.

I expect that inflation-adjusted costs will decrease for people not wanting the latest and greatest features in optics. Such as serviceable hunting-type scopes, with simple reticles, with minimal extra doo-dads.

I suspect there will be increasing improvements in zoom capabilities. One big challenge with 10x or 12x or whatever zoom is making useful reticles -- regardless of whether the optic uses ffp or sfp. Maybe multiple reticles per scope.

Fully electronic scopes probably aren't that far in the future. Akin to how 35mm cameras have gone from film to digital media. In the future, we may not be looking through glass, but at pixels on a screen.

Of course, much depends on the health of the firearms industry and the effects of legislation. Goods must be marketable, consumers must be willing to buy them, and the industry must remain healthy enough to innovate.
 
Posts: 6241 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Gracie Allen is my
personal savior!
posted Hide Post
I'm hoping for something simple - 1-4 or 1-6 power, 8" or shorter (the shorterer the betterer), weighing no more than 8-10 ounces (the lighterer the betterer - we're making rifles lighter and making scopes feel like three masts of sails on a canoe).
 
Posts: 23533 | Location: Deep in the heart of the brush country, and closing on that #&*%!?! roadrunner. Really. | Registered: February 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

SIGforum.com    Main Page  Hop To Forum Categories  Mason's Rifle Room    What will scopesights of the future look like?

© SIGforum 2019