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What’s a good carbon scraper/ bolt carrier/ bolt cleaning tool? Login/Join 
in the end karma
always catches up
posted
Finding less and less enthusiasm form Marine Corps cleaning rigor I am looking to find an easy way to clean my AR.

Something like this
Combat Application Tools Barrel Scraping Tool for Gun Cleaning and Maintenance https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009..._c_api_-2D1BbCANMHGF


" The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State" Art 1 Sec 32 Indiana State Constitution

YAT-YAS
 
Posts: 3110 | Location: Northwest, In | Registered: December 03, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Festina Lente
Picture of feersum dreadnaught
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I’ve got, use, and like this one: https://www.brownells.com/guns...-tool-prod38917.aspx



NRA Life Member - "Fear God and Dreadnaught"
 
Posts: 6501 | Location: in the red zone of the blue state, CT | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I use the C.A.T. M-4 tool.

https://www.rainierarms.com/ca...olt-carrier-cleaner/

(you can get it from anywhere, not just at the above link).

I've also given them away as gifts to other AR owners.

They're not the only tool out there, but I like the slim profile and compact size.
 
Posts: 17407 | Registered: August 12, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like the Real Avid AR scraper. Has something for each hard to reach place. More effective than the CAT.
 
Posts: 2384 | Location: Iowa | Registered: February 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by LDD:
I use the C.A.T. M-4 tool.

https://www.rainierarms.com/ca...olt-carrier-cleaner/

(you can get it from anywhere, not just at the above link).

I've also given them away as gifts to other AR owners.

They're not the only tool out there, but I like the slim profile and compact size.


I have one of those as well and I like it. There are a TON of knockoffs for a lot cheaper, some add a spring hinge to the tail scraper fork.
 
Posts: 5589 | Location: Romeo, MI | Registered: January 03, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Veteran of the
Psychic Wars
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Former Army Infantry guy chiming-in:

For routine cleaning, don't bother with a purpose made scraping tool. Your bolt group need not be immaculate for trouble free operation.

Yes, the carbon build-up is unsightly, but, you'll probably do more harm than good if you are repeatedly scraping components with those hard steel cleaning tools.

If you really want to use one, do it on a yearly or semi-annual basis. For regular cleaning, take an expended 5.56/.223 brass casing and use that to scrape the tail of the bolt. No need to clean the innards of you carrier (except as noted above).

Good lubrication is more critical than having everything "White Glove" clean.

The late Pat Rogers had a couple of carbines that were not cleaned in years (tens of thousands of rounds thru each). Those weapons ran like the proverbial top because they were properly lubricated. I am not saying don't clean, I am just saying there is no need to aggressively clean.


__________________________
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Posts: 1038 | Location: Va | Registered: March 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Not really from Vienna
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A 30 minute soak in Slip2000 Carbon Killer will soften the carbon enough to remove with a soft brush and water rinse, in my experience.

Might not even need that long-that’s just what I have given it.




 
Posts: 23293 | Location: Young American Teen Club | Registered: January 30, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
in the end karma
always catches up
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by mo4040:
Former Army Infantry guy chiming-in:

For routine cleaning, don't bother with a purpose made scraping tool. Your bolt group need not be immaculate for trouble free operation.

Yes, the carbon build-up is unsightly, but, you'll probably do more harm than good if you are repeatedly scraping components with those hard steel cleaning tools.

If you really want to use one, do it on a yearly or semi-annual basis. For regular cleaning, take an expended 5.56/.223 brass casing and use that to scrape the tail of the bolt. No need to clean the innards of you carrier (except as noted above).

Good lubrication is more critical than having everything "White Glove" clean.

The late Pat Rogers had a couple of carbines that were not cleaned in years (tens of thousands of rounds thru each). Those weapons ran like the proverbial top because they were properly lubricated. I am not saying don't clean, I am just saying there is no need to aggressively clean.


I hear what your saying and a part of me knows thats true but the other part that was on the other end of the Bn Ordnance Office going over my M16 and our M2 MK19 with dental picks and qtips just won’t go away so I try to strike a happy medium...haha


" The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State" Art 1 Sec 32 Indiana State Constitution

YAT-YAS
 
Posts: 3110 | Location: Northwest, In | Registered: December 03, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have/use the following tools.

For use on my workbench:

Brownells AR15/M16 Bolt Radius Scraper
https://www.brownells.com/guns...raper-prod31833.aspx

Mark Brown Custom - AR15/M16 Carrier Carbon Scraper
https://www.brownells.com/guns...craper-prod1851.aspx

For range bag/field use:

CAT M4 Tool
https://www.brownells.com/guns...-tool-prod31857.aspx


All three tools work very well and make cleaning the bolt tail and inside the carrier quick and easy.

NOTE: each of the bolt scrapers have a built-in "stand-off" to prevent metal to metal contact and thus the tools will not remove any finish or damage the bolt. You're left with a very thin layer of carbon on the bolt tail that does not need to be cleaned any further. Maybe the "happy medium" you seek...

tp
 
Posts: 866 | Location: Back in Texas... | Registered: February 09, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Wait, what?
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An excellent tool that is lying at your feet (literally) while shooting is a spent .223/5.56 casing. Mash the mouth flat with pliers or multi-tool, and it makes a dandy carbon scraper that CANNOT damage your bolt. Removes carbon easily from the gas bearing surface that is so hard to remove.




NIKE- The Swoosh with a Douche
 
Posts: 8954 | Location: Martinsburg WV | Registered: April 02, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Armed and Gregarious
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Just upgrade to one of these:
https://palmettostatearmory.co...-bolt-516446450.html

Worth every penny, in saved cleaning time.


___________________________________________
"He was never hindered by any dogma, except the Constitution." - Ty Ross speaking of his grandfather General Barry Goldwater

"War is the remedy that our enemies have chosen, and I say let us give them all they want." - William Tecumseh Sherman
 
Posts: 12409 | Location: Nomad | Registered: January 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by mo4040:
Former Army Infantry guy chiming-in:

For routine cleaning, don't bother with a purpose made scraping tool. Your bolt group need not be immaculate for trouble free operation.

Yes, the carbon build-up is unsightly, but, you'll probably do more harm than good if you are repeatedly scraping components with those hard steel cleaning tools.

If you really want to use one, do it on a yearly or semi-annual basis. For regular cleaning, take an expended 5.56/.223 brass casing and use that to scrape the tail of the bolt. No need to clean the innards of you carrier (except as noted above).

Good lubrication is more critical than having everything "White Glove" clean.

The late Pat Rogers had a couple of carbines that were not cleaned in years (tens of thousands of rounds thru each). Those weapons ran like the proverbial top because they were properly lubricated. I am not saying don't clean, I am just saying there is no need to aggressively clean.

Could not agree more. Old soldier here too and the military is a shining example of over the top more harm
Than good firearms maintenance
 
Posts: 2339 | Location: Finally free in AZ! | Registered: February 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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https://www.brownells.com/guns...26717.aspx?rrec=true

Mine works pretty well. I also have a long metal probe that helps.
I soak my bolt / bcg in engine cleaning fluid as well.


_____________________________________________________________________

"When its time to shoot, shoot. Dont talk!"

“What the government is good at is collecting taxes, taking away your freedoms and killing people. It’s not good at much else.” —Author Tom Clancy
 
Posts: 5274 | Location: Just moved: Downtown Chi-Town | Registered: February 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I use this one.
https://www.brownells.com/guns...-7189.aspx?rrec=true
But I follow the advice above and it really takes an act of congress for me to use it.
I've run thousands and thousands of rounds and not felt the need.


“So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.”
 
Posts: 7223 | Registered: October 14, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I should be closing in on 20k rounds through my ARs. Have retired one bolt due to wear on the lugs -- however it's still good enough for use as a backup bolt.

As an AR-15 noob, I thought bolts had to be spotlessly clean to work properly. What a crock. A complete myth -- perpetuated by shooters, gun associations, the military, and da webz. A little carbon on the rearward cone-shaped portion of the bolt isn't an issue.

As noted above, lubrication is way more important for operation than a spotless bolt.

Continually scraping the bolt (especially with a steel implement) is a good way to rough up the surface, which causes even more carbon to build up & at a faster pace.

As noted above, a used case with the mouth crushed a little will work for occasional scraping.

If it gets really bad, carbon killer solutions do a good job of removing carbon. So does an ultrasonic cleaner.

I wipe down my bolt, BCG, and interior of the AR after each shooting session. Regular wiping down keeps my bolts pretty clean, whether they are NiB coated or just parkerized. Including a few patches down the bore and a little lube -- I clean my ARs in 10-15 minutes, depending upon how distracted I am by the TV show I'm watching.
 
Posts: 5569 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
fugitive from reality
Picture of SgtGold
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by mo4040:
The late Pat Rogers had a couple of carbines that were not cleaned in years (tens of thousands of rounds thru each). Those weapons ran like the proverbial top because they were properly lubricated. I am not saying don't clean, I am just saying there is no need to aggressively clean.


Filthy 14 is the rifle of which you speak.


_____________________________
'I'm pretty fly for a white guy'.

 
Posts: 5938 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There is no need to scrape carbon from the bolt or carrier. I do exactky as Fritz described. Carbon scraping tools for ARs are an effective means to separate one from his money.


---------------------------------------------
"AND YEA THOUGH THE HINDUS SPEAK OF KARMA, I IMPLORE YOU...GIVE HER A BREAK, LORD". - Clark W. Griswald
 
Posts: 1914 | Location: The South | Registered: September 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by captain127:
quote:
Originally posted by mo4040:
Former Army Infantry guy chiming-in:

For routine cleaning, don't bother with a purpose made scraping tool. Your bolt group need not be immaculate for trouble free operation.

Yes, the carbon build-up is unsightly, but, you'll probably do more harm than good if you are repeatedly scraping components with those hard steel cleaning tools.

If you really want to use one, do it on a yearly or semi-annual basis. For regular cleaning, take an expended 5.56/.223 brass casing and use that to scrape the tail of the bolt. No need to clean the innards of you carrier (except as noted above).

Good lubrication is more critical than having everything "White Glove" clean.

The late Pat Rogers had a couple of carbines that were not cleaned in years (tens of thousands of rounds thru each). Those weapons ran like the proverbial top because they were properly lubricated. I am not saying don't clean, I am just saying there is no need to aggressively clean.

Could not agree more. Old soldier here too and the military is a shining example of over the top more harm
Than good firearms maintenance


I don't shoot ungodly amount of ammo like some do, but just a wipe down with a rag and solvent has always been enough for me.
 
Posts: 541 | Location: WV | Registered: May 30, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
fugitive from reality
Picture of SgtGold
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by mo4040:
Former Army Infantry guy chiming-in:

For routine cleaning, don't bother with a purpose made scraping tool. Your bolt group need not be immaculate for trouble free operation.

Yes, the carbon build-up is unsightly, but, you'll probably do more harm than good if you are repeatedly scraping components with those hard steel cleaning tools.


This. Thanks to the Army it too me years to un$&&! myself and relax my cleaning style.


_____________________________
'I'm pretty fly for a white guy'.

 
Posts: 5938 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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CAT M-4 tool is what I use. I have some ARs that need to have the bolt cleaned of carbon. Others not so much. One in particular is a PSA 6.8. Every 300-400 rounds it starts with failures to extract if I don't clean the carbon off the bolt's tail. The CAT M-4 tool is better than other tools I've tire. Quickly and effectively removes carbon from a bolt.
 
Posts: 555 | Location: DFW Area | Registered: January 12, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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