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Desert tech SRS A1 worth it? Login/Join 
TANSTAAFL
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I’ve got a little cash saved up. Had been considering a .38 super Premier II. Came across an unfired SRS A1 in 6.5x47 with a soft case, 3 mags, and bore guide for about 1k less than a new A2. Still crazy money, but it’s always been a dream rifle for me.

It’s not practical for anything like PRS so it would be a range gun and maybe a bit of hunting. But that’s a lot of cash for a toy.

That and I feel like when I pass I could leave a 1911 to my son. I wonder how well a plastic skinned rifle like the SRS will hold up, I’m rough on gear.

Anyone that has had one think it’s worth getting?
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No. I've shot them. Fed poorly, triggers stink, replacement barrel are expensive. Much better options available.
 
Posts: 2775 | Location: 9860 ft above sea level Colorado | Registered: December 31, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
half-genius,
half-wit
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A shooting pal of mine here in yUK is the importer for Desert Tech, and TBH, can't get enough of them into the country, even at the prices we have to pay over here - about 25% more in £££ than you pay in $$$. Another shooting pal has one in four calibres, and a 'spare in .338LM AND the HT1 in .406 Chey-Tac. I guess he's happy with them. Me, being a poor onlooker, I was unaware that it was made of plastic - certainly on the odd time I've gotten down close and cuddly with one of the demo models, it all seemed to be made of metal of some kind.
 
Posts: 10024 | Location: UK, OR, ONT | Registered: July 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
TANSTAAFL
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Tac, the action, barrel, and hand guard are metal, as are most of the small parts. But the stock is a plastic skin. Sort of like the old AI stocks used to be, it’s 2 parts that bolt together. The pistol grip is part of this and even the mag catch is attached to this it seems.
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by offgrid:
No. I've shot them. Fed poorly, triggers stink, replacement barrel are expensive. Much better options available.

Exactly

Of all the so-called precision rifles I've shot, the DTA is just about last one I would fork over my hard-earned cash for. Horribly poor feeding and the nasty trigger are deal breakers for me. Furthermore, I couldn't come close to shooting the DTAs I've tried at the accuracy levels they tout.
 
Posts: 6504 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
half-genius,
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Posts: 10024 | Location: UK, OR, ONT | Registered: July 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
TANSTAAFL
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That’s way too steep for my blood.
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
half-genius,
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That guy has every millionaire toy gun imaginable - see the Walther WA2000 in the next video?

...and yet he has a face on him like he was sat on a fired-up soldering iron. What do you think would make him smile?
 
Posts: 10024 | Location: UK, OR, ONT | Registered: July 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
TANSTAAFL
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Tac, he may be like me. My whole life, I’ve been told I should smile. Sometimes I thought I was when they said it.

My hunting gun is usually a 45-70 marlin. I work too much to ever get into PRS, but I really want to get some trigger time with a good bolt gun. I started last year with a TL3 in a mpa chassis, but something came up and I let it go. Maybe I should put another one together over the next few months or just say screw it an pick up a Tikka tac a1 and keep it simple.
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
TANSTAAFL
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Did the math. I can pick up a tikka tac A1 in 6.5 creedmoor from gunbroker and a used vortex razor from our classifieds for about exactly what I was looking to pay for just the SRS. Think I’ll start with that. Thanks for the sanity check.
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Theres opinions above that are far more experienced than mine but I own one and like it alot. I've read that you will either love or hate the DTA bullpup with very little in between. For me its compact and shoots well. I've had no issues feeding with the mags I have for my 338LM and 6.5C kits.

I didnt need the compactness but I dont hate it. I liked the ability to have more than one caliber and be able to switch without having to do armorer level work. The rifle is very easy to work on down to the little pins and such. Be aware that one of the A1 vs A2 differences is a barrel indexing pin that can bend when rebarreling if you dont follow procedure. A shop I used to use monkeyed with mine when it came in and I had to order and install a new one (free replacement from DT).

I havent competed or ran any stages with mine and havent used it for serious purposes so again its a sample size of one but I like mine and dont regret it. Its heavy for hunting unless youre stationary in my opinion.
 
Posts: 2237 | Location: Pnw | Registered: March 21, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
half-genius,
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By way of interest, the SRS model is very popular over here in UK simply because of its handiness in confined spaces, especially when operating out of a Land-rover, for instance. By far the majorityy of them sold here have the shortest barrel, which is still of course, quite long if it were to be fitted to a conventional rifle.
 
Posts: 10024 | Location: UK, OR, ONT | Registered: July 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
TANSTAAFL
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That was part of the draw for me as well. That it wasn’t much bigger than my AR’s length wise. That would be handy at the range and hunting. And I’d heard good things about the accuracy.

I’ve seen a lot of SRS A1’s for 2.5-3k. But usually in an odd caliber I’d need to reload for, like 6.5x47 or 7 WSM. But a big thing for me is I can almost get 2 top quality barrels for a bighorn or impact for the cost of one SRS barrel.
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
TANSTAAFL
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I did find a gen 2 razor in the classifieds. Haven’t decided for sure which way I’m going on the rifle.
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by tacfoley:
By way of interest, the SRS model is very popular over here in UK simply because of its handiness in confined spaces, especially when operating out of a Land-rover, for instance.

For the LEO who works from a vehicle and has a duty rifle, the bullpup design makes sense. Getting in and out of vehicle doors is challenging with just about anything larger than a handgun.

I am quite confident that for the majority of civilian rifle owners, the concept of "handiness" has limited practical value other than a way to justify the rifle's purchase. Sure, shorter rifles makes sense when hunting -- humping the gun across rough terrain, bushwhacking through undergrowth, and hanging out in a stand.

For many civilians, "handiness" comes into play only when they transfer the cased rifle between the back of their SUV and the firing line at a range. Then later when they case & uncase the rifle to place it in on the range's firing position. The time differences between deploying a 30" long rifle and a 60" long rifle is measured in mere seconds in such cases. But time is not of the essence, because the gun owners aren't on the clock and nobody is returning fire. Furthermore, once they're on the firing line -- likely a bench rest or fixed bay position -- gun movement is so minimal that there is no "handiness" difference between a 30" and a 60" long firearm.
 
Posts: 6504 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
TANSTAAFL
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Fritz, I’m not a reloader, at least not yet. I have a couple questions for you or maybe off grid. Not sure who else shoots a lot. I was offered a impact with a .223 barrel. I thought hey that would be handy to start with as a trainer/plinker since I have about 500 rounds of black hills 77gr. Then later I could get a 6.5 barrel, .308 bolt and some mags for more serious use.

But if I don’t start reloading 6.5 creedmoor Hornady eld seems to cost about the same as the black hills I used in the NM AR.

First, does a .223 trainer/plinker make sense? And does reloading save that much? If so, maybe I need to start.
I got a rockchucker master kit and some dies for Christmas a few years ago. Got divorced soon after and only recently opened the box when I found it in the basement when unpacking my stuff I had stashed. I might like plinking with a little.223. Maybe not with the good ammo though.
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't know what an "Impact" is.

The cost to reload is better addressed by others -- offgrid reloads. Nevertheless, the sum of handload component costs will be noticeably less than loaded factory ammo. If you have enough spare time so that reloading doesn't eat into your other activities, then the finished cost of handloaded ammo will be much less than factory ammo. I have extremely limited spare time, therefore I place a high value on my "free" time. With a little experimentation, so far I've found factory ammo that meets my accuracy demands.

Last year I completed a very nice 223 bolt action training rifle. It is a little lighter than my competition 6.5CM rifle, but their dimensions are very similar. Even if I didn't use it as an off-season trainer, my 223 bolt action rifle is something I should have done many years ago. With quality factory match ammo, the combination of great accuracy and minimal recoil is hard to beat.

For awhile in 6.5CM, Hornady Amax/ELD ammo was just about the best choice for accuracy in factory ammo. There are a number of other factory ammo options now, but Hornady works for me and I've stuck with it.
 
Posts: 6504 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
TANSTAAFL
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Sorry, I meant an impact 737R action. It’s a short action with 3 different bolts available (.223, .308, and magnum) A coworker has offered to sell me a used one he has with a 223 barrel and bolt in a foundation stock for a few hundred more than msrp on a tikka tac A1. Considering starting with that since I have the ammo to use and maybe upgrade to 6.5 with a new prefit and bolt as funds allow.
 
Posts: 600 | Location: Baltimore til I can get out of there. | Registered: June 08, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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