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Remington 700 SS 5R .308 Login/Join 
Truth Wins
Picture of Micropterus
posted
Picked this up today. Now the search for the perfect scope. Need to add a bipod, too.













 
Posts: 3161 | Location: Southeast Virginia | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Raised Hands Surround Us
Three Nails To Protect Us
Picture of Black92LX
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Nice!
A lot of folks poo poo about the 700 over the trigger issue years ago.

I have a VTR with the ported triangular barrel and it is a fine bolt gun.


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Or you can start over.
Regrets, no matter what you goin’ through. Jesus, He gave it all to save you. He carried the cross on His shoulders. So you can start over.
~NF RealMusic~
 
Posts: 21294 | Registered: September 06, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of pepsiblue
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Beautiful rifle!!





10mm lays waste to entire cities, cuts through diamonds and will tear Superman a new asshole. - Parabellum

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Arc.
___

Kill every last one of these goddamned animals. We need a president with balls. We need leadership. We should be carpet bombing these barbarians wherever we find them, and we should be looking for them 24/7. We have to unleash Hell upon them. They understand nothing but death, so death is what we should bring them, wholesale.... Para

I left "practical" behind many years ago. It was covered with my first Glock 19. (Fredward)
 
Posts: 2114 | Location: Kentucky | Registered: July 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Freethinker
Picture of sigfreund
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As a substitute for the one that arrived as a disaster?
Definitely classic and classy looking guns. I would be interested in a range report about such rifles these days.




“A man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest.”
— Simon & Garfunkel, The Boxer, 1970
 
Posts: 41413 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
You have cow?
I lift cow!
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I had some experience on one from about 2011 I think. Very accurate rifle. The stock color grew on me too.


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Posts: 5980 | Location: Bay Area | Registered: December 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Wins
Picture of Micropterus
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quote:
Originally posted by sigfreund:
As a substitute for the one that arrived as a disaster?
Definitely classic and classy looking guns. I would be interested in a range report about such rifles these days.


No, I bought 2 700s. A 700 BDL and this 700 SS 5R. The replacement for the BDL will arrive in mid-April. Apparently, they seem to be out of stock at my regular guy's suppliers.

It will be awhile before this one makes it to a range. I have to put a bipod and a scope on it and I don't want to scrimp on the scope so I may have to wait until next winter to put one on it. The BDL will likely get a scope first as I plan on taking it hog hunting in the fall.
 
Posts: 3161 | Location: Southeast Virginia | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have one of those from about 12-15 years ago. Great shooter on the bench. A little heavy for walking around in the field. Replaced the trigger with an aftermarket. Currently running a Vortex PST 4x15x50 with illuminated reticle. Can’t recall which 20MOA base I used any more, but the rings are XTRs.

Not sure about your specific rifle, but mine gives great results with FGMM in the 168 gr SMK load. For a hunting round, I like the Federal Premium with the 165 gr SGK bullet. Prints almost identically to the SMK load. Good results with Hornady Match and Super Performance ammo as well.


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Posts: 2608 | Location: Unass the AO | Registered: December 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Had one of these for about 10 years. Accurate, Very poor trigger. I used Badger 20MOA Base and 30mm rings with a Leupold M4 6.5-20 FFP scope, TMR reticle. a great scope.

Overall for the money a very good shooter, but you spend so much on the optics, trigger, mounts, etc the savings on the 5R get a little lost.

Enjoy it. You will catch the bug

John
 
Posts: 216 | Location: Massachusetts | Registered: September 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nice! I've had one for a while now. Put mine in an MPA chassis and swapped the factory trigger for a Trigger Tech Special. I'm using a Vortex Razor for the optic. It's very accurate & fun to shoot.


Like guns, Love Sigs
 
Posts: 1109 | Location: Battle Born | Registered: December 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
quarter MOA visionary
Picture of smschulz
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The 5R is a great baseline for a fine rifle (not that it isn't good all on its own).
Mine I uber upgraded it to a fine tack shooter.


 
Posts: 17782 | Location: Houston, TX | Registered: June 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Ermagherd,
10 Mirrimerter!
Picture of ElKabong
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I have the milspec model with the 5r barrel as well
Looks very similar to this one
It boringly shoots any ammo I feed it into .5/.75 groups @ 100yd


I quit school in elementary because of recess.......too many games
--Riff Raff--
 
Posts: 2520 | Location: WV | Registered: September 02, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Wins
Picture of Micropterus
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I actually like the trigger on mine, except for that damned adjustment screw, which sticks out too far.

I'm going to order a Harris bipod. I want one that will be handy shooting from a bench or prone. There are so many to choose from I am not sure which one to get.
 
Posts: 3161 | Location: Southeast Virginia | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Micropterus:
I'm going to order a Harris bipod. I want one that will be handy shooting from a bench or prone. There are so many to choose from I am not sure which one to get.

If you're set on a Harris, look at the one with swivel and notched legs. The Harris is well built and solid, meaning that it will last a long time and will put up with a lot of abuse. However, there are better bipods for bench and prone shooting.

Bipod hop has challenged shooters from the beginning. F-Class shooters mitigate hop by using large, wide bipods. Tacticial-type shooters mitigate hop by using bipods that have a little slack in the leg system. Hop is caused by recoil. Unless you have the buttstock jammed against a solid steel beam or concrete post, a rifle moves slightly to the rear during the recoil cycle. For a shooter with a 308 and good technique, the shouldered rifle will move rearward -- maybe at least 3/8", but possibly 5/8" or more.

The Harris bipod is solid, with no slack or movement from the attachment to the stock all the way to the feet. When the rifle moves rearward during recoil, the Harris' feet must also move rearward. Unless the feet slide freely on a perfectly smooth surface (say, a Teflon plate), the bipod will jump/hop/skip along the support surface during recoil. Some of this jump/hop/skip occurs while the bullet is still in the barrel, and thus accuracy suffers.

The starting price point for tactical-type bipods that mitigate hop is the Atlas bipod. Yes, there are more expensive bipods out that there that do things better than an Atlas.

If you really want to learn how to shoot your 700 accurately, consider investing in an Atlas instead of a Harris. Over the long haul, the Atlas' benefits cost that much.
 
Posts: 6429 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Freethinker
Picture of sigfreund
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quote:
Originally posted by Micropterus:
There are so many to choose from I am not sure which one to get.


My thoughts about bipods:

In general, for shooting from a bench shorter is better. I don’t normally use a bipod at all from a bench because for me bags or other types are steadier. The taller the bipod, the harder it is to prevent movement. I thought that Harris used to offer a very short bench model, but if so it’s been discontinued, and was probably not very good for most people to use from the prone.

If I were using a Harris bipod, I’d get one of the 6 to 9 inch models. The Atlas bipods I use have a maximum extension of 9 inches and I have never wanted anything taller on level surfaces. I have 3 inch extensions for the legs, but have literally never used them. Unless someone has difficulty getting low to the ground in the prone position, I wouldn’t consider one of the taller Harris models for shooting from the prone.

I also strongly recommend the models with notched legs. The smooth leg (“standard”) models permit the height to be adjusted to exactly where the shooter wants it, but in practice I found that style a pain to set up and adjust from the prone. The legs must be pulled out under spring tension and held in place while the locking screw is tightened. In addition, if the screw isn’t tightened securely (which makes it difficult to change the setting), there is a tendency for a leg to collapse, and dump the rifle and scope onto the ground—or off a bench!
I have never found the notched legs to be any sort of problem in adjusting the height.

Then there is the swivel feature that permits tilting the rifle left or right a few degrees. That is useful for leveling the gun precisely rather than adjusting the height of a leg. To lock the tilt in place, the swivel models have a knurled nut to tighten, but the adapter that uses a lever is more convenient. The Pod-Loc used to be the standard lever lock, but there are other options today, including, I believe, Harris’ own.

Having an adapter to permit the gun to be panned left/right without moving the bipod is also sometimes a useful feature depending on the type of shooting one does.

Finally, there is the mounting method. Most Harris models are designed to clamp directly to a sling swivel stud. That system works well, but it takes a little time to attach and remove so I prefer a quick detach system that clamps to a Picatinny rail section that’s permanently attached to the rifle stock. That’s hardly essential, though.

Most of the Harris bipods I own are the HBRMS model:
https://www.harrisbipods.com/HBRMS.php

Added:
Read the advice fritz offers. The Atlas bipod was the first good alternative to the Harris line that I discovered years ago, and I have a couple that I can mount on any of several different rifles. One advantage of the Atlas is that the mounting head of the original model permits panning and tilting, but it uses friction to limit movement after we’re on target. The friction tension can be adjusted and I’ve never wanted a hard lock when using an Atlas.

There are also others to consider these days, but I have never regretted spending the money for the Atlas models I own. Harris bipods were the standard for tactical shooters including military snipers for a long time, but that was because there were no other good options. Today there are many others that really are better.

Added, part deux:
Another advantage of the Atlas and some others is the ability to change the feet for different shooting surfaces. These days I pretty much use the standard rubber feet only on surfaces that I don’t want to damage, as when shooting from a car hood. Otherwise I much prefer spike feet that stay in position and, depending upon the design, have less tendency to sink into soft dirt that requires readjusting things every few shots. Not that it would probably ever be an issue for you, but on ice spiked feet are a must. Interchangeable feet are becoming more common following Atlas’ lead, and I believe there is an aftermarket adapter system for the Harris line.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: sigfreund,




“A man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest.”
— Simon & Garfunkel, The Boxer, 1970
 
Posts: 41413 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Micropterus:
Now the search for the perfect scope.

Take your time, do your research, figure out what you want, look for sales. Read the scope primer in this section.

Consider your primary uses first. I'm guessing this is a target rifle.
- Distances to targets, paper/steel/reactive, multiple targets in a short time or only one at a time.
- Shooting from a fixed location or moving between multiple locations. Prone & bench only, or alternative positions.
- If you shoot targets at more than one distance, do you intend to dial the elevation or use the reticle for hold overs/unders.
- Your preferred reticle type.
- First focal plane or second focal plane reticle.
- Magnification requirements.

And of course, budget. Include the cost of rings/mount in your budget.
 
Posts: 6429 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Next is ammo, although your shooting may be down the road a bit. Ammo is currently getting scare and pricey. I'll assume you're looking for target shooting accuracy, not hunting ammo. Also assuming you will buy factory ammo, at least initially.

You really can't go wrong with loads which feature Sierra MatchKing ("SMK") 168 grain, SMK 175, or Hornady Amax 168. These bullets have been around a long time, and virtually every ammo manufacturer knows how to load them. The bullets also tolerate variations in chamber sizes. They tend to be jump-tolerant, meaning that they shoot well throughout the life of your barrel, as the barrel's lands inevitably wear. Federal and Hornady are quality brands, as is Black Hills. Other options include Fiocchi, Aussie Outback, HSM, Remington, Winchester.

155 grain match bullets may work, too. Hornady's Amax and ELD are options. Lapua's HPBT.

Sierra's new Tipped MatchKing bullets ("TMK") offer great ballistics, but appear to be pretty finicky with chamber dimensions and barrel. Factory TMK loads don't shoot well for me -- it's probably a hand loaded bullet. Hornady's ELD bullets are a step up in ballistics over their Amax bullets. However, ELD loads don't always perform well in some rifles. But if ELD loads do shoot in your 308, they will noticeably outclass SMK and Amax at longer distances.

I do not recommend Hornady's Superformance ammo. Or for that matter, any company that loads ammo to increase muzzle velocity 100-200 fps beyond normal levels. Superformance may be accurate in your rifle, and it will offer flatter flight & less wind drift. On hot days and after shooting a few rounds, I experience signs of over pressure. First is a hard to lift bolt. Then flattened primers. If it really gets bad, expect blown primers and a bolt that has to be opened with a rubber mallet. If you want flight ballistics better than that of a normal 308, rechamber your barrel to a 6.5 Creedmoor.
 
Posts: 6429 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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