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Bore slugging fail. Advice needed. Login/Join 
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quote:
Originally posted by medic451:
This is probably a stupid idea since I know little to nothing about whats going on, but if its just wooden dowels stuck in the barrel can you just use something to gradually burn it out, like a torch?


I was thinking the same thing.
 
Posts: 3646 | Location: Chicago, IL, USA: | Registered: November 17, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Middle children
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Try something that will soften/break down the fibers of the wood without damaging the steel bore. Maybe soaking it in something like acetone, mineral spirits, or isopropyl alcohol would do the job. Once the fibers are softened a bit it should press out much more easily.
 
Posts: 2560 | Location: Midwest | Registered: September 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Do not run anything steel down the bore to drive the wood out. The only materials that should be used in that bore are those softer than the bore. Aluminum or brass. A solid metal rod is needed.

Use cooking spray such as pam. Swelling the wood isn't really an issue; A lubricant will reduce surface friction between the wood and the bore, and the bore is a lot stronger than the wood; swelling becomes largely irrelevant if the surface friction is reduced

If the wood was driven from the chamber end, then drive it bck out from the muzzle end: this is especially true if one piece of wood was driven into the other as a wedge. If you try to drive them in the original direction, you're only increasing the effect of the wedge. Drive it the other way.

There is no value to using a padded hammer or even a dead blow hammer; you're not adding any layer of protection, including the use of a plastic or soft face mallet. It's not an improvement and isn't saving anything.

A metal rod that fills the bore as closely as possible will be the safest to use; brass will be best, aluminum if you can't get brass rod. Support the chamber end of the barrel against wood, assuming the barrel is out of the action. Otherwise a proper vise and jig is best. Run the lubrication fro the bore end; use the lube only if you've already tried driving the blockage with a proper fitting metal rod; the rod should be as close to bore diameter as possible. Too narrow a rod will worsen the problem by acting as a wedge; a rod that fills the barrel won't flex, and will cover as much surface area as possible on the obstruction.

Prevent damage on the chamber end by supporting agaisnt wood; drill a hole over which the bore is centered, to allow for obstruction and rod passage. fully support the wood against a solid surface. Drive it out with firm blows.

Again, don't drive it with steel or any object harder than the barrel.

A long drill bit can be used to center-drill the obstruction, but with great caution, as any deviation to the bore will cause damage. Slow bit speed and slow progress is wise.

Freezing the barrel does the opposite of what you want to accomplish. The barrel size is reduced.
 
Posts: 5668 | Registered: September 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dinosaur
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quote:
Originally posted by armored:
quote:
Originally posted by medic451:
This is probably a stupid idea since I know little to nothing about whats going on, but if its just wooden dowels stuck in the barrel can you just use something to gradually burn it out, like a torch?


I was thinking the same thing.


Please tell me you’re both joking.
 
Posts: 6705 | Location: Maui, HI | Registered: December 15, 1999Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was not necessarily thinking torch, but heat.
 
Posts: 3646 | Location: Chicago, IL, USA: | Registered: November 17, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sns3guppy:
Do not run anything steel down the bore to drive the wood out. The only materials that should be used in that bore are those softer than the bore. Aluminum or brass. A solid metal rod is needed.

Use cooking spray such as pam. Swelling the wood isn't really an issue; A lubricant will reduce surface friction between the wood and the bore, and the bore is a lot stronger than the wood; swelling becomes largely irrelevant if the surface friction is reduced

If the wood was driven from the chamber end, then drive it bck out from the muzzle end: this is especially true if one piece of wood was driven into the other as a wedge. If you try to drive them in the original direction, you're only increasing the effect of the wedge. Drive it the other way.

There is no value to using a padded hammer or even a dead blow hammer; you're not adding any layer of protection, including the use of a plastic or soft face mallet. It's not an improvement and isn't saving anything.

A metal rod that fills the bore as closely as possible will be the safest to use; brass will be best, aluminum if you can't get brass rod. Support the chamber end of the barrel against wood, assuming the barrel is out of the action. Otherwise a proper vise and jig is best. Run the lubrication fro the bore end; use the lube only if you've already tried driving the blockage with a proper fitting metal rod; the rod should be as close to bore diameter as possible. Too narrow a rod will worsen the problem by acting as a wedge; a rod that fills the barrel won't flex, and will cover as much surface area as possible on the obstruction.

Prevent damage on the chamber end by supporting agaisnt wood; drill a hole over which the bore is centered, to allow for obstruction and rod passage. fully support the wood against a solid surface. Drive it out with firm blows.

Again, don't drive it with steel or any object harder than the barrel.

A long drill bit can be used to center-drill the obstruction, but with great caution, as any deviation to the bore will cause damage. Slow bit speed and slow progress is wise.

Freezing the barrel does the opposite of what you want to accomplish. The barrel size is reduced.


This ^^^^^^^

I would soak it in Kroil or Diesel fuel or Mouse Milk and knock it out with a brass rod.

Mouse Milk Penetrating lubricant:

https://www.amazon.com/Mouse-M...id=1609354531&sr=8-2

Brass Rod stock is not expensive:

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=bra...b_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_6_9

Sandpaper is typically made from Aluminum Oxide so I don't like Aluminum rods in my barrels unless they are coated.........


Remember, this is all supposed to be for fun...................
 
Posts: 3983 | Registered: April 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Mensch
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quote:
Originally posted by djpaintles:
quote:
Originally posted by sns3guppy:
Do not run anything steel down the bore to drive the wood out. The only materials that should be used in that bore are those softer than the bore. Aluminum or brass. A solid metal rod is needed.

Use cooking spray such as pam. Swelling the wood isn't really an issue; A lubricant will reduce surface friction between the wood and the bore, and the bore is a lot stronger than the wood; swelling becomes largely irrelevant if the surface friction is reduced

If the wood was driven from the chamber end, then drive it bck out from the muzzle end: this is especially true if one piece of wood was driven into the other as a wedge. If you try to drive them in the original direction, you're only increasing the effect of the wedge. Drive it the other way.

There is no value to using a padded hammer or even a dead blow hammer; you're not adding any layer of protection, including the use of a plastic or soft face mallet. It's not an improvement and isn't saving anything.

A metal rod that fills the bore as closely as possible will be the safest to use; brass will be best, aluminum if you can't get brass rod. Support the chamber end of the barrel against wood, assuming the barrel is out of the action. Otherwise a proper vise and jig is best. Run the lubrication fro the bore end; use the lube only if you've already tried driving the blockage with a proper fitting metal rod; the rod should be as close to bore diameter as possible. Too narrow a rod will worsen the problem by acting as a wedge; a rod that fills the barrel won't flex, and will cover as much surface area as possible on the obstruction.

Prevent damage on the chamber end by supporting agaisnt wood; drill a hole over which the bore is centered, to allow for obstruction and rod passage. fully support the wood against a solid surface. Drive it out with firm blows.

Again, don't drive it with steel or any object harder than the barrel.

A long drill bit can be used to center-drill the obstruction, but with great caution, as any deviation to the bore will cause damage. Slow bit speed and slow progress is wise.

Freezing the barrel does the opposite of what you want to accomplish. The barrel size is reduced.


This ^^^^^^^

I would soak it in Kroil or Diesel fuel or Mouse Milk and knock it out with a brass rod.

Mouse Milk Penetrating lubricant:

https://www.amazon.com/Mouse-M...id=1609354531&sr=8-2

Brass Rod stock is not expensive:

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=bra...b_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_6_9

Sandpaper is typically made from Aluminum Oxide so I don't like Aluminum rods in my barrels unless they are coated.........




From my OP:


I bought 3 12" lengths of .3125" brass dowel.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Yidn, shreibt un fershreibt"

"The Nazis entered this war under the rather childish delusion that they were going to bomb everyone else, and nobody was going to bomb them. At Rotterdam, London, Warsaw and half a hundred other places, they put their rather naive theory into operation. They sowed the wind, and now they are going to reap the whirlwind."
-Bomber Harris
 
Posts: 15588 | Location: Ivorydale | Registered: January 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Aluminum rod and aluminum oxide abrasive paper are very different things. The abrasive found in abrasive paper, referred to as aluminum oxide, is a naturally occurring form of aluminum oxide, called corundum. It has a hardness close to that of a diamond. An aluminum road, or most aluminum products, will have a thin layer of aluminum oxide, which is NOT the same as corundum, and is not hard and will not score a barrel. The untra thin layer of oxide that forms on bare aluminum is a natural protective coating, to protect against corrosion.
 
Posts: 5668 | Registered: September 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Many years ago I got a wood obstruction out of a rifle bore. For the life of me I can't remember what it was, how it got there, what gun it was or who it belonged to. I do remember "gnawing" at it a bit with sort of a home made patch retriever (used to get patches out of a muzzle loader) then eventually being able to drive it out. I remember it being soaked in wood and not being sure if that helped or not. (I suppose the type of wood matters)


_____________________________________________________
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Posts: 18303 | Location: 18th & Fairfax  | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Trying again. 8mm case on tope of the brass rod for better pounding surface. I'll update later today.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Yidn, shreibt un fershreibt"

"The Nazis entered this war under the rather childish delusion that they were going to bomb everyone else, and nobody was going to bomb them. At Rotterdam, London, Warsaw and half a hundred other places, they put their rather naive theory into operation. They sowed the wind, and now they are going to reap the whirlwind."
-Bomber Harris
 
Posts: 15588 | Location: Ivorydale | Registered: January 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sns3guppy:
Aluminum rod and aluminum oxide abrasive paper are very different things. The abrasive found in abrasive paper, referred to as aluminum oxide, is a naturally occurring form of aluminum oxide, called corundum. It has a hardness close to that of a diamond. An aluminum road, or most aluminum products, will have a thin layer of aluminum oxide, which is NOT the same as corundum, and is not hard and will not score a barrel. The ultra thin layer of oxide that forms on bare aluminum is a natural protective coating, to protect against corrosion.


You have forgotten that most consumer products made using aluminum are typically anodized, which produces a surface hardness approaching that of a diamond.

quote:
Originally posted by kz1000:
Trying again. 8mm case on top of the brass rod for better pounding surface. I'll update later today.


kz1000, use a larger hammer than you think you need. Tapping with a hammer that is to light for the task results in poor control of the hammer. Using a heavier hammer allows the use of a lighter stroke with a much higher degree of control.

I will also note that you really should remove the entire action from your stock and work from the breech end. I will also note that if you do have to drill out some of this blockage it is an absolute must that you install a Guide Bushing on your drill bit. Note, you can get some very long drill bits out their, 20 years ago I needed an extra long bit to allow me to add wiring for new outlets in my house. Got a 2 or 3 foot long drill bit at Home Depot.

As for the guide bushing to protect the barrel, that can be either brass, hardwood like walnut or ebony, or Nylon. You need a diameter that slides into the barrel with gravity alone about 1 inch long. Drill out the I.D. to a diameter that is a tight fit on the drill bit. Then install that bushing onto the drill about 2-3 inches back from the point and EPOXY IT IN PLACE. Note, I mean good old 2 part EPOXY, NOT locktite or crazy glue. BTW, there are plastic epoxies that will hold on Nylon. By doing this you keep the cutting edges on the drill from contacting your barrel. Downside to this is that you will be drilling the plug at a diameter about 1/2 of the caliber (0.140 or there abouts) but you will have a well centered hole in the parts you need to drive out. Once that hole is created it can act as a guide for a larger bit (1/4" at the largest). You will also need to remember that long drill bits will wander, it's why most deep hole drilling is done by gun drills. You can go about 6 inches deep into a chunk of hardwood before the bit wanders enough to risk hitting the rifling provided you are starting with a guide hole dead on center. Any deeper than that will damage your rifling. BTW, a Gun Drill Bit tends to cost somewhere around 150 dollars or more so it may be wisest for you to take your action to a gunsmith who has some gun drill bits.

So, what to do with those blockages once you have some hole in the center. The first thing I would try is a wood screw stub welded to a piece of threaded rod and rig up a weight to make it into a slide hammer. Yes, it does mean you are putting a steel something into your barrel but a bit of #6 threaded rod wrapped in electricians tape won't harm your barrel. BTW, a 5/32 pilot hole is a bit too large for a wood screw thus my suggestion of a 0.140 diameter starter hole. However if you can only find a 5/32" bit long enough for your need it may work as a pilot hole for a #10 wood screw.

Note, my suggestions are just that, suggestions. Fact is that the approach that will actually work is something that you will have to experiment until you find a solution. Which is another reason for just taking your action in to a gunsmith. In the long run it may be the least expensive approach.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Scooter123,


I've stopped counting.
 
Posts: 4712 | Location: Michigan | Registered: November 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No, aluminum oxide or anodizing it is not even close to diamond. The only thing "approaching" diamond is CBN.
 
Posts: 2570 | Location: Indiana | Registered: December 28, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Been hammering on it since Friday. Slowly getting there, no hurry. I don't have any ammo for it.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Yidn, shreibt un fershreibt"

"The Nazis entered this war under the rather childish delusion that they were going to bomb everyone else, and nobody was going to bomb them. At Rotterdam, London, Warsaw and half a hundred other places, they put their rather naive theory into operation. They sowed the wind, and now they are going to reap the whirlwind."
-Bomber Harris
 
Posts: 15588 | Location: Ivorydale | Registered: January 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Update:

Couldn't move it anymore with the hammer. Bought brass picks, going to remove as much wood as I can, then try the hammer & brass dowel again. If that doesn't work, I'll have to take it to a gunsmith.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Yidn, shreibt un fershreibt"

"The Nazis entered this war under the rather childish delusion that they were going to bomb everyone else, and nobody was going to bomb them. At Rotterdam, London, Warsaw and half a hundred other places, they put their rather naive theory into operation. They sowed the wind, and now they are going to reap the whirlwind."
-Bomber Harris
 
Posts: 15588 | Location: Ivorydale | Registered: January 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Wait, what?
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Read this thread on how others have successfully done what you’re attempting- read it carefully and decide if it might work for you if no other options will.

https://www.thehighroad.org/in...ck-in-barrel.617355/




“We have put together, I think, the most extensive and and inclusive voter fraud organization in the history of American politics.”- Joe Biden
 
Posts: 12348 | Location: Martinsburg WV | Registered: April 02, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have thrown in the towel. Found a couple of highly rated gunsmiths locally waiting for a response. One just emailed me that he has a 9 month backlog, customers are still dropping guns off (What is wrong with people?).

This message has been edited. Last edited by: kz1000,


------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Yidn, shreibt un fershreibt"

"The Nazis entered this war under the rather childish delusion that they were going to bomb everyone else, and nobody was going to bomb them. At Rotterdam, London, Warsaw and half a hundred other places, they put their rather naive theory into operation. They sowed the wind, and now they are going to reap the whirlwind."
-Bomber Harris
 
Posts: 15588 | Location: Ivorydale | Registered: January 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Wins
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9 months might be long enough for the termite solution to work.


_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4031 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Micropterus:
9 months might be long enough for the termite solution to work.



I'm trying something in that vein since no gunsmith has replied.

Bought a 3/16' X 12" drill bit, tapping into the wood, turning by hand carefully. Hopefully this will relieve some of the pressure so I can tap it out.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Yidn, shreibt un fershreibt"

"The Nazis entered this war under the rather childish delusion that they were going to bomb everyone else, and nobody was going to bomb them. At Rotterdam, London, Warsaw and half a hundred other places, they put their rather naive theory into operation. They sowed the wind, and now they are going to reap the whirlwind."
-Bomber Harris
 
Posts: 15588 | Location: Ivorydale | Registered: January 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Don't Panic
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quote:
Originally posted by kz1000:
Bought a 3/16' X 12" drill bit, tapping into the wood, turning by hand carefully. Hopefully this will relieve some of the pressure so I can tap it out.

Here's hoping...

Is there enough of a gap between the outside of the drill and the inside of the barrel to put some sort of protective sleeve over the drill to protect the bore surface? If so, that might give some protection against any slips.
 
Posts: 13521 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: October 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Maybe sleeve the bit with a soda straw? Might need to slit it lengthwise to fit around it.

Todd


phxtoad

"Careful man, there's a beverage here!"
 
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