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114 Years Young (Swedish Hotness) Login/Join 
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“Fresh” from the ol Carl Gustaf Gevärfaktori, my first Mauser of the Swedish variety.



I am thinking this won’t be the last, it’s an amazing shooter, and 6.5X55 turns out to be pretty awesome as well.
I am beginning to do some preliminary calculating on how to free up the price of a 94/14 Carbine. And maybe something set up with diopter sights....

Bill R

This message has been edited. Last edited by: stylophiles,
 
Posts: 823 | Location: Wet side of WA | Registered: October 24, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The swedish Mauser rifles are among the very best military surplus guns to be had. You‘ve made a rewarding choice (beware, you‘ll end up buying more of them Wink)

The wood of your stock still have clear edges and is „proud“ over the metal, so ist looks to be original and propably hadn‘t been sanded (judging by your photo).

The original ladder sight has been replaced by the „SM sikte ASJ ram“ fine adjustable sight (very often done to rifles used by swedish home guard and for civilian shooting competition).

The black burned spot on the handguard behind the sight indicates that someone used a flame to darken the sight for target shooting.

Enjoy the challenge to revive the shooting feeling of times gone by (I find the long M96 rifles to be the easiest to shoot precisely, I‘ve got three of them; an all original 1905 Carl Gustav, a 1910 Carl Gustav with Västeras fine adjustable sight and a 1943 Husqvarna with Söderin diopter)!

Swedish Mauser Rifle Manual

More info on gotavapen.se


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Aus einem traurigen Arsch kommt niemals ein fröhlicher Furz.
(Martin Luther)
 
Posts: 313 | Location: Hamburg / Germany | Registered: November 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by stylophiles:
“Fresh” from the ol Carl Gustaf Gevärfaktori, my first Mauser of the Swedish variety...

Beautiful Rifle....Got any other views of your 'Swedish Hotness' you can share? Wink


____________________________________________________________

If Some is Good, and More is Better.....then Too Much, is Just Enough !!
Trump 2020....KAG!
 
Posts: 3815 | Location: New Hampshire | Registered: October 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Excellent rifle. Excellent target sights. Excellent cartridge.
 
Posts: 3035 | Registered: January 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
half-genius,
half-wit
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My m/96 Carl Gustaf bears the date 1898 and the serial number 89X.

It shoots like a mad thing.
 
Posts: 10043 | Location: UK, OR, ONT | Registered: July 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I took my carbine out hunting this year. I was very successful with it.
 
Posts: 5900 | Location: Virginia | Registered: December 23, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I will try to get some better photos once I get it cleaned up, that was just off the range bench in a hurry.

I got it from a gent who has been collecting Swedes for years, he had this one and another both bought back in the early 90s I think he said. I do remember him saying he didn’t think he went much over 100 when he got them!

It’s definitely a surplus rifle, but probably the nicest surplus rifle I’ve bought. Some light surface rust that should clean up with a little oil and brass wool, but the wood is very nice. All numbers matching. Just a very, very nice time capsule piece!


Bill R

This message has been edited. Last edited by: stylophiles,
 
Posts: 823 | Location: Wet side of WA | Registered: October 24, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by from HH:
The swedish Mauser rifles are among the very best military surplus guns to be had. You‘ve made a rewarding choice (beware, you‘ll end up buying more of them Wink)

The wood of your stock still have clear edges and is „proud“ over the metal, so ist looks to be original and propably hadn‘t been sanded (judging by your photo).

The original ladder sight has been replaced by the „SM sikte ASJ ram“ fine adjustable sight (very often done to rifles used by swedish home guard and for civilian shooting competition).

The black burned spot on the handguard behind the sight indicates that someone used a flame to darken the sight for target shooting.

Enjoy the challenge to revive the shooting feeling of times gone by (I find the long M96 rifles to be the easiest to shoot precisely, I‘ve got three of them; an all original 1905 Carl Gustav, a 1910 Carl Gustav with Västeras fine adjustable sight and a 1943 Husqvarna with Söderin diopter)!

Swedish Mauser Rifle Manual

More info on gotavapen.se

Excellent information here, thank you. I agree on the ease of hitting well with the long M96. Mine is 1921 Carl Gustaf. When I bought mine the circular disk in the stock was gone and I've since replaced it with a non-original. Mine did however have a rectangular metal label beside the round cutout with what looks like sight settings for hitting at different ranges. "Sikte for trubbkula skjutning med spetskula"
thanks for your reply to this post and beautiful rifle stylophiles.
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"The days are stacked against what we think we are." Jim Harrison
 
Posts: 929 | Location: Ann Arbor | Registered: September 07, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
7.62mm Crusader
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I picked up a AG42B auto loader just prior to the import ban. The Hakim and Soviet rifles I've always thought of as copies, giving the Swedes credit for such a well made auto rifle. I actually dont know who borrowed from whos idea. The Ljungman had such a unique action.
 
Posts: 16013 | Registered: December 23, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
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quote:
Originally posted by David Lee:
I picked up a AG42B auto loader just prior to the import ban. The Hakim and Soviet rifles I've always thought of as copies, giving the Swedes credit for such a well made auto rifle. I actually dont know who borrowed from whos idea. The Ljungman had such a unique action.


The Hakim is an Egyptian copy of the AG42 Ljungman, produced under license.

The Soviet SVT 38/40 and the AG42 Ljungman are not related to each other. They were developed independent of each other, and do not use the same operating mechanisms. (The development behind the SVT actually predates the AG42 design by a number of years; develoment of the SVT began in the early 1930s, whereas development of the AG42 began in the late 1930s.)

They're only somewhat similar cosmetically, in the way that all detachable magazine semiauto battle rifles of the time followed somewhat similar general layouts.

 
Posts: 24747 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That 6.5x55 is a sweet round, who needs a Creedmoor?
 
Posts: 4142 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sourdough44:
That 6.5x55 is a sweet round, who needs a Creedmoor?


You are right!!! Kind of re invented the wheel with the Creedmoor round didn’t they. What is old is new again. And all that jazz.

Now, Criterion Barrels has a special run of 6.5 Swede Garand barrels last year. I missed out. Trying to contact them to plead to do another one!!!
 
Posts: 3035 | Registered: January 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sweet. They are great rifles. Congrats.

Mine is dated 1899. It is, except for the bolt release, all matching numbered parts, even the stock and upper foregrip.

They sure don't make them like this anymore.

 
Posts: 3303 | Location: Southeast Virginia | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
7.62mm Crusader
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Nice FN49 Rogue. Mine came with spanking new stock and hand guards. The 8mm is a fatty. I dont recall if any if these had ever been converted to maybe .308? Anyhow, the 6.5 Swede is a nice old cartridge.
 
Posts: 16013 | Registered: December 23, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
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quote:
Originally posted by David Lee:
Nice FN49 Rogue. Mine came with spanking new stock and hand guards. The 8mm is a fatty.


Sounds like you got one of the Egyptian FN49s assembled by Century Arms.

When Egypt surplussed their 8mm FN49s (which had been used alongside their 8mm Hakim rifles), Century bought the lot, along with all of their leftover parts and pieces, which included 1500 spare receivers.

Century sold the complete rifles as-is in the 1980s, and then set about assembling a fair number of additional rifles (1000+) using the leftover FN49 parts and spare receivers, combined with new production stocks.

These Century-assembled FN49s are recognizable by the oversized beech reproduction stocks that Century had commissioned, along with the distinct "eagle of Saladin" Egyptian crest that was present on these spare receivers but not on the original FN-made Egyptian contract FN49s.

Eagle of Saladin:


Century assembled FN49 over an original surplus Egyptian FN49:



quote:
Originally posted by David Lee:
I dont recall if any if these had ever been converted to maybe .308?


Argentina converted their FN-49s, which were originally produced for them by FN in 7.65x53mm Mauser, over to 7.62/.308 in the 1960s. They used their converted FN49s alongside the FN FAL (also in 7.62 NATO) during the 1960s-1980s, including during the Falklands War against Britain.

These Argentine 7.62 FN49s were also adapted to use 20 round detachable magazines, instead of their original 10 round magazine. They were similar to FN FAL magazines, but not cross-compatible.

A number of these 7.62 FN49s were imported into the US in the 1990s.

 
Posts: 24747 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
7.62mm Crusader
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Thank you Rogue. I posted of the AG42B here a couple years back hoping to see one. I too had a nice 96 rifle and one can see the lineage between the two rifles. Some where along the line I acquired a French MAS bolt rifle at a give away price. It looked new. I had the bolt model and a friend had the auto. I tried to buy the auto but he wouldn't sell. Never fired a round of the 7.5. Cannot recall, one was the 49 and one the 51. I do recall they used the same evil crusiform bayonet. A nasty little tool right there.
 
Posts: 16013 | Registered: December 23, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just gonna say it....

RogueJSK is my spirit animal...

It’s good to have someone towards which to aspire, collection wise!

Bill R
 
Posts: 823 | Location: Wet side of WA | Registered: October 24, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the flattery, and not to burst your bubble, but keep in mind that many of the photos I post are not of my actual collection, which is much more modest. Wink They're often just example photos I've dug up through Google Images, used to illustrate points in my posts.
 
Posts: 24747 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Wow, that is beautiful. I don't follow military arms but I admire them for their old fashioned craftsmanship and history. I've considered it but it's hard to wrap my head around such a broad field of detail and history.

How much does an upper grade Swede like the OP's run ?




Lover of the US Constitution
Wile E. Coyote School of Gunsmithing
 
Posts: 6876 | Location: Nowhere the constitution is not honored | Registered: February 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by wrightd:
How much does an upper grade Swede like the OP's run ?


If I recall right, I think I paid like 420, which included a 30 discount for making an hour and a half drive which saved the shipping hassles.

Plus, got to meet a great semi local guy who is a big Swede Mauser fan, so a big win all around!

From what I have seen, it looks like if you budget between 500-600 you should be able to get a very nice 96 rifle.

Once you start wandering off into the carbines, snipers, and target versions.... bring more $$$!

Bill R
 
Posts: 823 | Location: Wet side of WA | Registered: October 24, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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