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Experts.

I have a Beretta Onyx (Not a Pro) with 26 inch barrels. It is chambered in 12 gauge and overall seems to be a nice shotgun.

I cleaned it, shot a round of trap/skeet with it, performed well enough for me.

Someone saw it and said it was a "Field Gun" suitable for hunting small birds etc...

I have used google and only find mention of the Onyx Pro and this is marked 686 onyx only.

Can anyone tell me where to find some info on this model?

Appreciated.


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Posts: 1904 | Location: FL | Registered: May 07, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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its a field gun because 26" barrels, otherwise its the same as a Silver Pigeon 1 but black
 
Posts: 1122 | Location: Leesburg VA | Registered: December 21, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't own a Beretta, but I have shot a number of them. Furthermore, I've seen a lot of Berettas in competition.

O/U shotguns primarily intended for field use generally have 24" to 26" barrels, with an occasional 28". Those primarily intended for clays games generally have 30" to 32" barrels, with an occasional 28" or 34".

Field guns often lack a mid-barrel bead, and thus have only the bead at the end of the barrel. Clays games shotguns often have mid- and end-barrel beads, sometimes with the end-barrel bead being made of hi-viz plastic.

Field guns almost always have an automatic safety. When the action is closed, the safety is automatically on and must be disengaged to fire. Clays games guns almost always have manual safeties -- the shotgun is ready to fire when the action is closed.

The differences between field and competition shotguns can sometimes be quite subtle. The middle ground is a bit muddied, and thus many shotguns serve equally well for both birds and clays.
 
Posts: 5019 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fritz:
I don't own a Beretta, but I have shot a number of them. Furthermore, I've seen a lot of Berettas in competition.

O/U shotguns primarily intended for field use generally have 24" to 26" barrels, with an occasional 28". Those primarily intended for clays games generally have 30" to 32" barrels, with an occasional 28" or 34".

Field guns often lack a mid-barrel bead, and thus have only the bead at the end of the barrel. Clays games shotguns often have mid- and end-barrel beads, sometimes with the end-barrel bead being made of hi-viz plastic.

Field guns almost always have an automatic safety. When the action is closed, the safety is automatically on and must be disengaged to fire. Clays games guns almost always have manual safeties -- the shotgun is ready to fire when the action is closed.

The differences between field and competition shotguns can sometimes be quite subtle. The middle ground is a bit muddied, and thus many shotguns serve equally well for both birds and clays.


The above post nailed it. All of my Berettas are field guns, and all are used for sporting clays. I prefer 28” barrels on my hunting guns, and have no problem beating guys with more specialized guns. The biggest difference is the safety being automatic on field guns, which is important for a hunting gun. Sounds like you ran into a sporting clays snob. I have a buddy that can out shoot just about everyone at our club with a 410 pump or a 12 gauge coach gun. I personally use clays as a way to practice for upland bird hunting, which is why I don’t want a clays shotgun.


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Posts: 1551 | Location: Middle-TN | Registered: November 05, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The guy was not trying to be snobbish. He had what looked like a VERY expensive purpose built shotgun and some sort of trophy belt buckle. He seemed knowledge, so I asked.

I did not pay a bunch for it and I am going to try and shoot trap and skeet with it for a bit. I know other models can be big money so I will stick with my "Bird Gun" for now.


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Posts: 1904 | Location: FL | Registered: May 07, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by leonidas211:
The guy was not trying to be snobbish. He had what looked like a VERY expensive purpose built shotgun and some sort of trophy belt buckle. He seemed knowledge, so I asked.

I did not pay a bunch for it and I am going to try and shoot trap and skeet with it for a bit.

Expensive shotguns generally indicate a commitment to clays games, but sometimes just a healthy bank account. The most expensive shotgun I've borrowed from another shooter in a sporting clays tournament was a Beretta SO5. It was his retirement present to himself -- probably a $25k present. Nice guy, but he really couldn't shoot all that well. At that time I was probably in my last season of AA class, before moving up to Master class. The guy was in B or C class, with limited hope of advancing.

In practice I've shot a gold engraved Gamba -- maybe $70k or more of shotgun. That owner used to be in Master class, but got tired of the of the competition scene. He knows virtually any brand of shotgun, and his technique is solid.

In big sporting clays comps you'll see a lot of shotguns retailing for $5k to $15k. Around here the guys who know their stuff often have guns which show some wear, and usually without extra bling. They tend to dress relatively low key, with the exception of a patch or two on a shooting vest. You may also see a number of skilled competitors with older Brownings and Berettas that crush clays rather well with their "second tier" guns. One doesn't have to pay for a Perazzi and Krieghoff in order to break clays consistently.

There can be hubris in clays games shooters as they rise in the ranks. It's something I don't care much for. Fortunately there is a boatload of highly skilled shooters who will do just about anything to help newer and less skilled shooters.

You should do just fine with your Onyx.
 
Posts: 5019 | Location: Colorado | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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fritz named most of the differences in field and clays guns. one other is that clays guns often have extractors only (meaning you have to manually pull your empties from the chambers) while field guns often have ejectors (springs fire the empties out of the chambers when the action is broken.)



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Posts: 8063 | Location: Marietta, GA | Registered: February 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fritz:
The differences between field and competition shotguns can sometimes be quite subtle. The middle ground is a bit muddied, and thus many shotguns serve equally well for both birds and clays.

For skeet and sporting clays, the dimensional differences are REALLY small since a relatively flat shooting gun is desirable. Trap guns make it easier to hit the rising birds with the higher POI but they certainly aren't mandatory.

quote:
@dking - The biggest difference is the safety being automatic on field guns, which is important for a hunting gun.

Are pumps and autos used for hunting? How many have automatic safeties?
It isn't any more important on a O/U or SxS than it is on an A400 or 870.


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Posts: 2342 | Location: AZ - West side of the valley | Registered: October 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by leonidas211:
The guy was not trying to be snobbish. He had what looked like a VERY expensive purpose built shotgun and some sort of trophy belt buckle. He seemed knowledge, so I asked.

I did not pay a bunch for it and I am going to try and shoot trap and skeet with it for a bit. I know other models can be big money so I will stick with my "Bird Gun" for now.


You can do just as well with that gun as you can a $15,000 Parazzi in trap and skeet.
 
Posts: 15048 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
quote:
Originally posted by leonidas211:
The guy was not trying to be snobbish. He had what looked like a VERY expensive purpose built shotgun and some sort of trophy belt buckle. He seemed knowledge, so I asked.

I did not pay a bunch for it and I am going to try and shoot trap and skeet with it for a bit. I know other models can be big money so I will stick with my "Bird Gun" for now.


You can do just as well with that gun as you can a $15,000 Parazzi in trap and skeet.


Well I had it out again. Busted plenty of clays. I am happy with it. I actually got some compliments on the shotgun.

I will give a report back after a few trips.


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Posts: 1904 | Location: FL | Registered: May 07, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fritz:
quote:
Originally posted by leonidas211:
The guy was not trying to be snobbish. He had what looked like a VERY expensive purpose built shotgun and some sort of trophy belt buckle. He seemed knowledge, so I asked.

I did not pay a bunch for it and I am going to try and shoot trap and skeet with it for a bit.

Expensive shotguns generally indicate a commitment to clays games, but sometimes just a healthy bank account. The most expensive shotgun I've borrowed from another shooter in a sporting clays tournament was a Beretta SO5. It was his retirement present to himself -- probably a $25k present. Nice guy, but he really couldn't shoot all that well. At that time I was probably in my last season of AA class, before moving up to Master class. The guy was in B or C class, with limited hope of advancing.

In practice I've shot a gold engraved Gamba -- maybe $70k or more of shotgun. That owner used to be in Master class, but got tired of the of the competition scene. He knows virtually any brand of shotgun, and his technique is solid.

In big sporting clays comps you'll see a lot of shotguns retailing for $5k to $15k. Around here the guys who know their stuff often have guns which show some wear, and usually without extra bling. They tend to dress relatively low key, with the exception of a patch or two on a shooting vest. You may also see a number of skilled competitors with older Brownings and Berettas that crush clays rather well with their "second tier" guns. One doesn't have to pay for a Perazzi and Krieghoff in order to break clays consistently.

There can be hubris in clays games shooters as they rise in the ranks. It's something I don't care much for. Fortunately there is a boatload of highly skilled shooters who will do just about anything to help newer and less skilled shooters.

You should do just fine with your Onyx.



working in the firearms business, I often get a chuckle out of the shotgun crowd,

they tend to be more brand conscious and flavor of the month fickle than any old high power shooter would ever think of being, (saying that as some one that shot high power)

I have a good customer who got bit by the trap bug, went thru a couple of brownings then jumped on a Zoli,

seems happy now, but I can see him moving up to another Italian gun or maybe a Kreighof,

he has his son shooting as well, and coveting his Zoli,,

but like most sports, if you can afford it, do it, esp if it helps your confidence level (and you have the skills)



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Posts: 6095 | Location: Beach VA,not VA Beach | Registered: July 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by fritz:
I don't own a Beretta, but I have shot a number of them. Furthermore, I've seen a lot of Berettas in competition.

O/U shotguns primarily intended for field use generally have 24" to 26" barrels, with an occasional 28". Those primarily intended for clays games generally have 30" to 32" barrels, with an occasional 28" or 34".

Field guns often lack a mid-barrel bead, and thus have only the bead at the end of the barrel. Clays games shotguns often have mid- and end-barrel beads, sometimes with the end-barrel bead being made of hi-viz plastic.

Field guns almost always have an automatic safety. When the action is closed, the safety is automatically on and must be disengaged to fire. Clays games guns almost always have manual safeties -- the shotgun is ready to fire when the action is closed.

The differences between field and competition shotguns can sometimes be quite subtle. The middle ground is a bit muddied, and thus many shotguns serve equally well for both birds and clays.


Fritz is right. All those Beretta O/U guns have the same basic action. You have to go up to the DT 10 to get a different action. It is the details and degree of fanciness that varies. They are good guns.




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Posts: 44526 | Location: Texas | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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