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ichi-go ichi-e
Picture of Underworld2086
posted
I missed the boat when classic firearms brought over a bunch of them but I'd still like to acquire a Finnish m39. I was looking on gunbroker and some of the rifles have cracked stocks which is understandable given their age. Obviously a cracked stock is not ideal however is it a deal breaker?
 
Posts: 686 | Location: Kailua, HI | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
Picture of RogueJSK
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Unless you or someone you know if well-versed in properly repairing a cracked wood stock, then yes, it's likely a deal breaker.

Replacement stocks are tough to find, and expensive when/if you do find one.

Many rifle stock cracks are repairable, but unless you or a buddy can do it yourselves correctly, it's likely not financially reasonable to pay a gunsmith to do it. Just be more patient and wait for a non-cracked M39.


They're fantastic rifles. Easily the best of the Mosin-Nagants. I've owned several, but I'm down to just these two now. Mine like Heavy Ball ammo, which can be tough to find these days, as 99% of the 7.62x54r on the market is Light Ball.

1942 Sako M39
1941 VKT M39
 
Posts: 23105 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is it actually a cracked stock or a two piece. If you look at Rogue’s you can see where they were fitted together. My Sako is a two piece and where they join up it looks like “fingers” for a lack of a better term.

Fine rifles and very accurate.
 
Posts: 2774 | Registered: January 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The Unknown
Stuntman
Picture of bionic218
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quote:
My Sako is a two piece and where they join up it looks like “fingers” for a lack of a better term.


I believe (and I'm sure Rogue can correct me if I'm wrong) that the "fingers" or "wedge grooves" are an actual arsenal repair. Believe it or not, in the case of many Mosin Nagants, an arsenal repaired stock can actually increase the value.
 
Posts: 10227 | Location: missouri | Registered: October 18, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
"Member"
Picture of cas
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It would depend on the break for me.

I bought an M44 for $40 that the stock was completely broken off at the wrist. Repaired it better than new. Smile



I have a Lithgow Enfield where unbeknownst to me when I bought it, the rear of the fore stock was mostly mush. Frown 90 years of oil and ancient arsenal repairs had come undone. Saved it, lots of Gorilla glue holding that one together now. Works as a shooter, I wouldn't want to take it into combat. Big Grin


_____________________________________________________
Sliced bread, the greatest thing since the 1911.

 
Posts: 16883 | Location: 18th & Fairfax  | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Define expensive for replacement stocks. Granted, it was a couple of years ago, but I bought a birch stock for one of my M39's that looked unissued/new. It wasn't that much. I do have a M39 stock, with a crack in it that I replaced with the birch stock. The M39 is superior to any Mosin; the aluminum bedding and the trigger, not to mention the barrel's, really put them in a class by themselves.
 
Posts: 76 | Registered: February 06, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
ichi-go ichi-e
Picture of Underworld2086
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While I'm at it why do you see some of these rifles with counter bored barrels? What was the purpose for doing this? Does it lower the value on a rifle? Is it less accurate?
 
Posts: 686 | Location: Kailua, HI | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
ichi-go ichi-e
Picture of Underworld2086
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quote:
Originally posted by 357fuzz:
Is it actually a cracked stock or a two piece. If you look at Rogue’s you can see where they were fitted together. My Sako is a two piece and where they join up it looks like “fingers” for a lack of a better term.

Fine rifles and very accurate.


Ya it's not near the front end of the rifle. The rifles I was looking at had cracks near the top of the grip by the rear of the bolt.
 
Posts: 686 | Location: Kailua, HI | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
Picture of RogueJSK
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quote:
Originally posted by Taterporkchop:
Define expensive for replacement stocks. Granted, it was a couple of years ago, but I bought a birch stock for one of my M39's that looked unissued/new. It wasn't that much.


You can't just go out and buy one from a parts retailer any more. They do show up from time to time on eBay or Gunbroker, but the ones I've seen get bid up to several hundred dollars.

For example, there's one on eBay right now for $225. And it's damaged.

quote:
Originally posted by Underworld2086:
While I'm at it why do you see some of these rifles with counter bored barrels? What was the purpose for doing this? Does it lower the value on a rifle? Is it less accurate?


Rifles that had damage to the crown were counterbored to recess a new, undamaged crown further down into the barrel. A counterbored barrel will be more accurate than a non-counterbored barrel with a damaged crown, and generally just as accurate as a non-counterbored, non-damaged barrel.

Some collectors prefer barrels that aren't counterbored. Some don't care. So it can potentially lower the value a little, but it's very common on military surplus rifles, so the impact is generally minimal.
 
Posts: 23105 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you're looking for a good M39, hit up Dennis Kroh at Empire Arms. He does a lot of the Finn stuff, and his quality control is first rate.


What, me worry?
 
Posts: 2006 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: September 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great, thanks guys. Just after i pick up three Sweedish mausers.
 
Posts: 5434 | Location: Virginia | Registered: December 23, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I used to have a pile of Finn M/N's. Great guns tho the 39 is not a model 20 years later I feel like hauling thru the mountains chasing ridge runners!

Big Grin



**********************
53 Jesus said to them, “Very truly I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you.

Read Quod Apostolici Muneris (1878) LEO XIII. This Pope warned us about the Socialists before most folks knew what a Socialist was...
 
Posts: 5031 | Location: Idaho, USA | Registered: May 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Mensch
Picture of kz1000
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I scored when they were cheap. 1942 Sako with an antique receiver, absolutely zero finish & a beautiful stock.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Yidn, shreibt un fershreibt"

"The Nazis entered this war under the rather childish delusion that they were going to bomb everyone else, and nobody was going to bomb them. At Rotterdam, London, Warsaw and half a hundred other places, they put their rather naive theory into operation. They sowed the wind, and now they are going to reap the whirlwind."
-Bomber Harris
 
Posts: 15115 | Location: Ivorydale | Registered: January 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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great rifles
 
Posts: 1880 | Location: Leesburg VA | Registered: December 21, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
fugitive from reality
Picture of SgtGold
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I have an M39 B barrel.


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Posts: 6237 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Diversified Hobbyist
Picture of Steve 22X
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by Underworld2086:
While I'm at it why do you see some of these rifles with counter bored barrels? What was the purpose for doing this? Does it lower the value on a rifle? Is it less accurate?


Rifles that had damage to the crown were counterbored to recess a new, undamaged crown further down into the barrel. A counterbored barrel will be more accurate than a non-counterbored barrel with a damaged crown, and generally just as accurate as a non-counterbored, non-damaged barrel.

Some collectors prefer barrels that aren't counterbored. Some don't care. So it can potentially lower the value a little, but it's very common on military surplus rifles, so the impact is generally minimal.


Rogue, your answer is not entirely correct.
Yes counter boring the barrel should by necessity include a fresh crown but these barrels were counter bored because the rifling towards the end of the barrel was worn.
If it was simply a matter of refreshing the crown, they would not have needed to counter bore them since a simple re-crown would suffice.


-----------------------------------
Regards, Steve
The anticipation is often greater than the actual reward
 
Posts: 2437 | Location: Wylie, Texas | Registered: November 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Steve 22X:
quote:
Originally posted by RogueJSK:
quote:
Originally posted by Underworld2086:
While I'm at it why do you see some of these rifles with counter bored barrels? What was the purpose for doing this? Does it lower the value on a rifle? Is it less accurate?


Rifles that had damage to the crown were counterbored to recess a new, undamaged crown further down into the barrel. A counterbored barrel will be more accurate than a non-counterbored barrel with a damaged crown, and generally just as accurate as a non-counterbored, non-damaged barrel.

Some collectors prefer barrels that aren't counterbored. Some don't care. So it can potentially lower the value a little, but it's very common on military surplus rifles, so the impact is generally minimal.


Rogue, your answer is not entirely correct.
Yes counter boring the barrel should by necessity include a fresh crown but these barrels were counter bored because the rifling towards the end of the barrel was worn.
If it was simply a matter of refreshing the crown, they would not have needed to counter bore them since a simple re-crown would suffice.


Various German rifle barrels were counterbored from the factory during WW2 which provided additional protection against muzzle damage. I suspect this may also have occurred with Finn M/N barrels.

It's actually a good idea and would not be a bad practice on hunting rifles in general.


**********************
53 Jesus said to them, “Very truly I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you.

Read Quod Apostolici Muneris (1878) LEO XIII. This Pope warned us about the Socialists before most folks knew what a Socialist was...
 
Posts: 5031 | Location: Idaho, USA | Registered: May 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
ichi-go ichi-e
Picture of Underworld2086
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So I got a m39 off gunbroker but something has me concerned about that gap in the stock and tang of the receiver.
https://drive.google.com/open?...pT19t-bt0z9EMEmHb4wM
 
Posts: 686 | Location: Kailua, HI | Registered: June 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
fugitive from reality
Picture of SgtGold
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Not common, but not dangerous.

https://forums.gunboards.com/s...t-91-30-bad-tang-fit


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'I'm pretty fly for a white guy'.

 
Posts: 6237 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Freethinker
Picture of sigfreund
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quote:
Originally posted by Steve 22X:
Yes counter boring the barrel should by necessity include a fresh crown but these barrels were counter bored because the rifling towards the end of the barrel was worn.


Did the Finns issue/use those pull-through bore cleaning chains with aluminum beads as other European militaries did? I.e., was there a particular reason for why the rifling at the end of the barrel was more worn than elsewhere?




“I can’t give you brains, but I can give you a diploma.”
— The Wizard of Oz
 
Posts: 39951 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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