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Read the CONSTITUTION
Picture of Mountain Man
posted
Looking to add a 357 magnum Lever gun to my collection, and due to all the consolidation in industry, and movement of manufacturing, not sure way to do. I want RELAIBILY and Parts or serviceability as my biggest points.

1. Marlin: Love the features,9 have a 336 30-30) no " Current " 357's, so they are $$$ for older ones. How is parts availiability ?


2. Winchester: Possibly a 94AE, Now made in Japan, how reliable are new vs old ? And again, parts or service.

3. Se CHIAPPA, but have never seen one. Great points of take down, stainless, but only a limited distributorship.

Hear Henry is good, but only downfall is tube loading, strongly prefer the receiver loading port.




A 9mm in MY Hand is better than a 45 at home.
SIG P-239 357.. The Modern Martial Arts
Pair of 226 Navy's

Too many" LOW INFORMATION VOTERS "
si vis pacem para bellvm
 
Posts: 1980 | Location: UN Constitution State  | Registered: October 22, 2000Report This Post
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You should look at the Rossi-built 1892s. While the action isn't really "smooth" out of the box they are durable and can be had for around $450-500.
 
Posts: 534 | Registered: September 27, 2008Report This Post
I'm not laughing
WITH you
Picture of Rolan_Kraps
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Uberti rifles (now owned by Beretta) have been in this country for over 25 years IIRC. There is a huge after market supply of original and third party parts and accessories.

Remington has addressed quality issues with new Marlins. Inspect first, but you should be able to trust them. Older "JM" stamped barrels are still preferred. Plenty of parts and will always will be.

Probably the same for Winchester 1892s and 1894s. I will tell you that 92s and 94s are sensitive to overall length. So if you try to go "fast" you'll be more likely to "Stovepipe" rounds.

Rossi rifles are copies of the 1892. Should be a reliable supply of parts.

My 1894 CSS Marlin in .357


My 1873 Uberti and IAC 1887 12 gauge


I have a Chiappa shotgun, but don't really know anyone who has one. I love my Chiappa 1887.





Rolan Kraps
SASS Regulator
Gainesville, Georgia.
NRA Range Safety Officer
NRA Certified Instructor - Pistol / Personal Protection Inside the Home
 
Posts: 21729 | Location: Gainesville, GA | Registered: October 11, 2005Report This Post
Prepared for the Worst, Providing the Best
Picture of 92fstech
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If you can find a Marlin, get it. I have an 1894 in .357, and it's probably my favorite rifle. I know there have been a lot of negative comments online about the new "Remlin" Marlins, but I recently bought a new-manufacture 1895 in .45-70, and it's put together really well. I think some of the negative feedback on the "Remlins" may be overblown.
 
Posts: 2576 | Location: In the Cornfields | Registered: May 25, 2006Report This Post
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For the money the Rossi 92 can be a great shooter if you have some mechanical skills, patience, and the ability to learn from a video for the earlier 1886.

The Rossi receiver is mainly broached and as a result there are a lot of burrs adjacent to these cuts. Take a thin stone and flat file the inside of the receiver and you'll have a very smooth cycling lever action. If you want to make it even smoother take 1/2 coil off the spring for the lever Detent. Just note, the 1892 is somewhat challenging to take down and VERY fiddly to get back together because the lever and bolt have to be positioned perfectly to slide together. First time doing this plan about 2 hours, with enough practice you can take one down and have it back together in under 1/2 hour.

Pluses for the Rossi in comparison to my original Winchester is that it feeds 38 special as perfectly as 357 Magnums. That isn't the case with my Winchester, it's a 1904 that a previous owner had converted from 32-20 sometime in the 50's or 60's when Winchester was offering these conversions. As a result the 32-20 case lifter is distinctly "fussy" with 38 specials and you have to develop a slight pause in cycling the lever so the shorter cartridge can slide back on the lifter so it will feed properly.

Another plus for the Rossi is the barrel is drilled and tapped for a short rail section that can be mounted where the rear sight is dovetailed in. Weaver offers a 4X scope (Pn 849417) with a 10 inch eye relief that just clears the ejection port.

http://www.rossiusa.com/accessories-scope.cfm

http://www.midwayusa.com/produ...dual-x-reticle-matte

The only real minus for the Rossi is the 1:38 rifling is simply too slow to properly stabilize any bullet heavier than 140 grains. With 125 grain bullets it's got decent accuracy in the range 1.5 MOA. Try using 158 grain bullets and the accuracy can fall to 5 MOA and you will see some keyholing in your targets. BTW, my re-barreled Winchester will do sub 1 MOA with a rear tang peep sight when I really concentrate.


I've stopped counting.
 
Posts: 3882 | Location: Michigan | Registered: November 07, 2008Report This Post
Plowing straight ahead come what may
Picture of Bisleyblackhawk
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Scooter123 is right on target on the Rossi (or any '92) being somewhat of a challenge to disassemble (YouTube is your friend) the first time (its easier after a couple of times) but with a little polishing and a spring kit it turns out to be a slick rifle for the money...

http://sigforum.com/eve/forums...0601935/m/1590089514

The newer manufacture Marlins are a world better than the first "Remlins" right after the takeover by Remington, both in fit and finish as well as function...finding a .357 might be problem...I've seen a few .44 magnums...

As of late the only lever actions in .357 I have been seeing have been Uberti and Henry...my LGS had two Rossi 16" barrel .357 for $479 but both sold before Christmas.


********************************************************

"we've gotta roll with the punches, learn to play all of our hunches
Making the best of what ever comes our way
Forget that blind ambition and learn to trust your intuition
Plowing straight ahead come what may
And theres a cowboy in the jungle"
Jimmy Buffet
 
Posts: 7222 | Location: Southeast Tennessee...not far above my homestate Georgia | Registered: March 10, 2010Report This Post
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Picture of sigcrazy7
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quote:
Originally posted by 92fstech:
If you can find a Marlin, get it. I have an 1894 in .357, and it's probably my favorite rifle. I know there have been a lot of negative comments online about the new "Remlin" Marlins, but I recently bought a new-manufacture 1895 in .45-70, and it's put together really well. I think some of the negative feedback on the "Remlins" may be overblown.


Oh no, it was not overblown. The initial Remlins sucked so bad they barely functioned. Here's what I have heard, FWIW. Sounds credible, but I have no direct source. If memory serves, I heard this on a Tom Gresham show.

After Marlin was purchased, no employees went to NY. The name and the tooling made the ride. As it turns out, the machinery was so worn that there were adjustments on top of adjustments to compensate for the tool wear. Think margin notes saying adjust +. 002 +. 003 +.004. Since no employees went, nobody knew how to operate the old tooling to produce a quality product. Remington had to basically retool the line, and now have it up and running with new CNC machines. They are initially making 1895s in 45-70, and will be rolling out other models/calibers shortly.

If you can find an older 1894, even if it is expensive, it is so worth it. I love mine. It cycles .38spcl and .357 like a dream. When Marlin gets ahead of the curve and new ones show up, I'm buying another just because I want to (two). Wink



[i]
 
Posts: 4981 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Report This Post
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Or just buy an old used something of your choice. May take a bit of time but they are around. I find the hunt for such things as half the fun. I am devoid of a lever at the moment having given my deceased fathers Winchester 94 trapped in 45 Colt to my niece, she always liked that gun and it will stay in the family. I had a previous older Rossi 92 in 357 that worked great as well as a couple of original Winchester 92's in 25/20 and 32/20. While the Rossi is nice you can't beat the originals for smooth.
 
Posts: 2101 | Location: Finally free in AZ! | Registered: February 14, 2003Report This Post
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Im in the same boat, looking for a good 357 levergun. Good info.


☣Biohazard☣
 
Posts: 6509 | Location: Alpine, Ut | Registered: February 17, 2010Report This Post
Wait, what?
Picture of gearhounds
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Pay the extra, buy a pre-Remington Marlin. Rossi lever guns are perfectly adequate if you only plan to run open sights; if you want to mount optics at some point, Marlin and Henry are your best bet. I've heard good things about Henry products if you can get past the use of a loading tube. I cannot.

The annual rumor mill is indicating that Marlin is once again (again) planning to re-tool and start production of .357 levers again, but I will believe it when they start showing up in gun shops. Even then, I would opt for paying another $100-200 for a fine pre-Remarlington; I've handled enough recent manufacture specimens to be doubtful that they've worked all the gremlins out of the Remlins.




Proudly deplorable
 
Posts: 7630 | Location: Martinsburg WV | Registered: April 02, 2011Report This Post
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I've been looking for .357 lever carbine for a while. At this point, I am going to go with a Henry Big Boy carbine. Yeah I know they have a loading tube, but I am ok with that.
 
Posts: 1937 | Location: St.Louis County MO | Registered: October 13, 2006Report This Post
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Picture of wingspar
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quote:
Originally posted by 92fstech:
I think some of the negative feedback on the "Remlins" may be overblown.


No, it was Not overblown. You can spend days reading about the problems with the Remlins on marlinowners.com. There is a Marlin Rant section of the forum dedicated just to the problem with the Remlins.

I bought a new Remlin 1894 in .357 Magnum in 2014. I won’t go into details here, but what a piece of junk and extremely poor service. I bought an older JM stamped 1894 in .45 Colt last year and the difference between it and the Marlin is night and day.

I have heard that Remington is finally getting their act together on the 1894's, but you won’t ever catch me looking at one. Look for a JM stamped 1894, but if you want to buy a new Remlin, look it over carefully before plunking down your hard earned dollars. Positive comments on them are becoming more common.


---------------
Gary
Will Fly for Food... and more Ammo
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If Guns Cause Crime, Mine Are Defective.... Ted Nugent
 
Posts: 1845 | Location: Oregon | Registered: January 15, 2010Report This Post
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I have had 2 Marlins in .357. I sold my 1894C and still have my 1894 Cowboy Limited in .357.

Out of the box, go for the Japanese-made Winchester 1892 short rifle. You can't reliably shoot .38's with it but with .357 it likes i don't know any better .357 lever gun out there.
 
Posts: 1127 | Registered: June 09, 2006Report This Post
Competent When Sober
Picture of Mad Max
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I have one of the Henry steel carbines in 357. I like it a lot and it shoots great. However it doesn't have a loading gate. Has a magazine tube that is loaded like your typical 22 lever.




Oliver Wendell Holmes - "The young man knows the rules, but the old man knows the exceptions."

 
Posts: 1812 | Location: San Antonio, Texas | Registered: July 24, 2001Report This Post
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Picture of Rolan_Kraps
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quote:
Originally posted by Mad Max:
Competent When Sober


I love that line!

Wingspar is right about the early "Remlins". Lots of serious problems like barrels screwed in wrong poor tolerances, bad wood to metal fit, some that just plain wouldn't function. Most problems have been corrected.




Rolan Kraps
SASS Regulator
Gainesville, Georgia.
NRA Range Safety Officer
NRA Certified Instructor - Pistol / Personal Protection Inside the Home
 
Posts: 21729 | Location: Gainesville, GA | Registered: October 11, 2005Report This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Mad Max:
I have one of the Henry steel carbines in 357. I like it a lot and it shoots great.


Drove up to Cabellas today, since they stock some Henry rifles. Put my hands on a few Brass rifles, and even the steel receiver versions.

WOW Big Grin

Fit and finish was great, the action was BUTTER smooth, and price is fair. Cant even touch a used marlin for a new Henry price. They didn't have any 357's, only 44 mag & 45 Colt.

I tried my 336 30-30 in the cold, with gloves this weekend. Lets just say I think the Henry was much easier to manipulate the feeding tube.

So I'm going to look over the models a bit more, since so many choices, but the Henry just jumped ahead of the pack.




A 9mm in MY Hand is better than a 45 at home.
SIG P-239 357.. The Modern Martial Arts
Pair of 226 Navy's

Too many" LOW INFORMATION VOTERS "
si vis pacem para bellvm
 
Posts: 1980 | Location: UN Constitution State  | Registered: October 22, 2000Report This Post
fugitive from reality
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Mountain Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Mad Max:
I have one of the Henry steel carbines in 357. I like it a lot and it shoots great.


Drove up to Cabellas today, since they stock some Henry rifles. Put my hands on a few Brass rifles, and even the steel receiver versions.

WOW Big Grin

Fit and finish was great, the action was BUTTER smooth, and price is fair. Cant even touch a used marlin for a new Henry price. They didn't have any 357's, only 44 mag & 45 Colt.

I tried my 336 30-30 in the cold, with gloves this weekend. Lets just say I think the Henry was much easier to manipulate the feeding tube.

So I'm going to look over the models a bit more, since so many choices, but the Henry just jumped ahead of the pack.


I have a steel Henry 357. It's a nice little carbine that's a hoot to shoot. I don't find the front loading tube to be an issue, and it makes it easier to unload.


_____________________________
'I'm pretty fly for a white guy'.

 
Posts: 5319 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Report This Post
Plowing straight ahead come what may
Picture of Bisleyblackhawk
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Mountain Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Mad Max:
I have one of the Henry steel carbines in 357. I like it a lot and it shoots great.


Drove up to Cabellas today, since they stock some Henry rifles. Put my hands on a few Brass rifles, and even the steel receiver versions.

WOW Big Grin

Fit and finish was great, the action was BUTTER smooth, and price is fair. Cant even touch a used marlin for a new Henry price. They didn't have any 357's, only 44 mag & 45 Colt.

I tried my 336 30-30 in the cold, with gloves this weekend. Lets just say I think the Henry was much easier to manipulate the feeding tube.

So I'm going to look over the models a bit more, since so many choices, but the Henry just jumped ahead of the pack.


Bud's is showing .357 Henrys, both steel and brass frames, in stock...not sure how the prices are compared to Cabella's, but one thing about Bud's is free shipping (only insurance if you choose) and they don't charge sales tax...you just pay whatever the transfer fees from your receiving FFL...

Every purchase I have made from Bud's has been been flawless...

https://www.budsgunshop.com/ca...+BOY+STEEL+357M38SPL

https://www.budsgunshop.com/ca...n+wOctagon+Blue+Barr


********************************************************

"we've gotta roll with the punches, learn to play all of our hunches
Making the best of what ever comes our way
Forget that blind ambition and learn to trust your intuition
Plowing straight ahead come what may
And theres a cowboy in the jungle"
Jimmy Buffet
 
Posts: 7222 | Location: Southeast Tennessee...not far above my homestate Georgia | Registered: March 10, 2010Report This Post
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Are there any good options for a 357 lever gun to suppress? Doesn't seem that any come threaded from the factory and it looks like they would all need the front sight moved. The Henry would seem to be the least desirable because of the tube loading. I was just wondering if there was anything else to consider.
 
Posts: 565 | Location: Wyoming | Registered: December 27, 2004Report This Post
Not really from Vienna
Picture of arfmel
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I believe the magazine tube will need to be shortened and the barrel band moved on the typical lever gun, as well.




 
Posts: 20799 | Location: Young American Teen Club | Registered: January 30, 2007Report This Post
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