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Found my .270's twin: Rem 700 BDL .30-06 Login/Join 
Truth Wins
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I recently picked up a new Remington 700 BDL .270. I wanted a .30-06 but the dealer only had the new .270 so I took that. Naturally, right after I bought it, they listed the same rifle in .30-06. Since I had planned on reacquiring a .270 at some point anyway, I decided to keep it, but couldn't resist the .30-06. I've been wanting one so I could retire my current .30-06 and preserve it for my son. So now, My .270 has a twin.

I have zero desire to restock these into synthetic. I love the BDL stocks. They are both bedded very well. But with wood being imperfect, I need to shim the bottom metal on my .270 so the door will close as securely as its intended. I've got shims coming from Pacific Tool and Gauge. But the .30-06 seems perfect. Otherwise, timing, primary extraction, fit and finish, bore, chamber are all where they ought to be on both guns. I realize I take a chance on warranty work on Remingtons, but the 700, except for the trigger some years back, is one rifle Remington has always done well. And there are a plethora of good 700 smiths out there if it's something I can't fix myself.

Now, two rifles I have to scope. I'm thinking a Leupold VX3i 3.5-10x40 on the .270, and a VX3i 2.5-8x36 on the .30-06.













_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
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Those are beautiful!

I am also all-in with the Remington 700 lineup. Mine are stainless steel. They are chambered in .223, 30-06, and .375 H & H. The .375 H & H rifle is one of the early XCR series.
It's stainless steel, with electroless nickel plating, and then a PVD coating on top. Essentially corrosion proof.
At one time, Remington had a video on their website showing time elapse video of several competitors stainless steel barreled actions and a Remington 700 XCR.
All the barreled actions were held in a fixture and sprayed with salt water spray. (some Mil Spec specific test procedure)
After 40 hours, all of the competitors barreled actions looked like steel farm fence posts pulled up from a urine & feces soaked barnyard.
The XCR looked pristine. So I bought one...

While I also love the look of the wood stock models, mine are all synthetic.

(all my 700's are 20 years old or more)

Many years ago I had an opportunity to purchase a Remington 11-87 Premier 12 gauge shotgun from a coworker.
He had won the shotgun at a Friends of the NRA dinner. ($5 for a ticket if I remember correctly) 25 or more years ago.
It's really beautiful. Grade II wood. Machine engraved receiver with gold fill.
He needed cash for paying bills and sold it to me for a fair price.

I decided to deer hunt with that shotgun. While hunting in a tree stand and bringing the shotgun up into the stand with a pull-rope, I had an "oopsie" and scratched the buttstock.
My stock looked just like your two new rifles. That finish looks and feels like molten glass has been poured onto them.
Luckily, I was able to sand the scratch with 2000 grit wet and dry sandpaper and them polish with auto body rubbing compound. (the scratch did not completely penetrate the finish)
I believe it is an epoxy coating.

After that fiasco, I went to the sporting goods store and purchased a Remington black synthetic stock/forend set.

I put the beautiful wood pieces into the blister pack packaging the synthetic pieces came in and put them away in the safe.

Someday when I'm gone, the wood pieces can be reinstalled and maximum value will be realized.

Plus when using that shotgun, I'm not concerned about beating up that beautiful walnut.

I went with Leupold 50mm objective scopes on the 30-06 and .375 H & H rifles, for maximum light gathering in dawn/dusk hunting situations.
But damn, they sure are expensive now.

Congratulations! Those two rifles will do 90% or greater of all North America hunting situations. (especially in the lower 48)

You should get one for the big bears and/or moose. You only "need" one more...



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Posts: 1039 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Wins
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Believe me, I've considered a .375 H&H but it's hard for me to justify. Even just as a "want, not need." But if I had an Alaska hunt planned, it would be high in the running.

I said I didn't have a desire to restock these into synthetic. And right this second I don't. But I'm wishy washy as hell on stuff like that. I've toyed with the idea of a Bell and Carlson or an HS Precision, and preserving the stocks like you have done. I might change my mind tomorrow, I don't know. Like I said, wood is imperfect and I like the solidity of these B&C and HS Precision stocks. I have a stainless steel 700 5R in .308 sitting in a HS Precision stock. (I've got to scope that up, too.) Scoping with be January-February projects.

I really wanted another .30-06. My go-to Ruger 77 Mk II stainless steel in the boat paddle stock with a Bausch and Lomb Elite scope is with my son now. I really miss that rifle but it's doing well for him, too. And I want to retire my Mannlicher Schoenauer while it still has a great bore. My son will inherit that, one day. The other .30-06s and .270 I've owned have come and gone. I'm glad to have the .270 back, and to have a new go-to .30-06.


_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Are these "new old stock" or has Remington resumed production?
 
Posts: 8493 | Location: The Red part of Minnesota | Registered: October 06, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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New old stock.


_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Tupperware Dr.
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Nice pair of 700s, there’s just something about a Remington BDL that is dead sexy.
Of all the BDL rifles I’ve had my favorite is an anniversary model in fiddle back maple.

It’s a 30/06 and shoots 168 SMK’s very well.
Like all my Remingtons I replaced the trigger assembly with a Timney unit.

I hunted with it for years and it’s a pleasure in the woods.
A few years ago I added it a black recoil pad which I think really finishes the rifle off.
 
Posts: 3276 | Registered: December 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Wins
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The place where I bought this has/had a Model 7 in .257 Roberts in curly maple. Holy crap, that was hard to pass up.


_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Caribou gorn
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love it! I love that you found them with iron sights.

I also love gun twins and often find myself buying in series. I have Belgian auto 5's in each gauge and I'm working up to a bunch of Ruger M77s and No 1s up and down the line as well.



I'm gonna vote for the funniest frog with the loudest croak on the highest log.
 
Posts: 9378 | Location: Marietta, GA | Registered: February 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Wins
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quote:
Originally posted by YellowJacket:
love it! I love that you found them with iron sights.

I also love gun twins and often find myself buying in series. I have Belgian auto 5's in each gauge and I'm working up to a bunch of Ruger M77s and No 1s up and down the line as well.


Very nice. I like pairs, too.

I don't really have any other exact twins, and these won't be for very long as they will be scoped differently. I do have a couple of sequentially numbered Ithaca Model 37s. And I have a couple of Marlin 336s that look alike, except one is .30-30 and the other .35 Remington.


_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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quote:
Originally posted by cee_Kamp:
Those are beautiful!

I am also all-in with the Remington 700 lineup. Mine are stainless steel. They are chambered in .223, 30-06, and .375 H & H. The .375 H & H rifle is one of the early XCR series.
It's stainless steel, with electroless nickel plating, and then a PVD coating on top. Essentially corrosion proof.
At one time, Remington had a video on their website showing time elapse video of several competitors stainless steel barreled actions and a Remington 700 XCR.
All the barreled actions were held in a fixture and sprayed with salt water spray. (some Mil Spec specific test procedure)
After 40 hours, all of the competitors barreled actions looked like steel farm fence posts pulled up from a urine & feces soaked barnyard.
The XCR looked pristine. So I bought one...

While I also love the look of the wood stock models, mine are all synthetic.

(all my 700's are 20 years old or more)

Many years ago I had an opportunity to purchase a Remington 11-87 Premier 12 gauge shotgun from a coworker.
He had won the shotgun at a Friends of the NRA dinner. ($5 for a ticket if I remember correctly) 25 or more years ago.
It's really beautiful. Grade II wood. Machine engraved receiver with gold fill.
He needed cash for paying bills and sold it to me for a fair price.

I decided to deer hunt with that shotgun. While hunting in a tree stand and bringing the shotgun up into the stand with a pull-rope, I had an "oopsie" and scratched the buttstock.
My stock looked just like your two new rifles. That finish looks and feels like molten glass has been poured onto them.
Luckily, I was able to sand the scratch with 2000 grit wet and dry sandpaper and them polish with auto body rubbing compound. (the scratch did not completely penetrate the finish)
I believe it is an epoxy coating.

After that fiasco, I went to the sporting goods store and purchased a Remington black synthetic stock/forend set.

I put the beautiful wood pieces into the blister pack packaging the synthetic pieces came in and put them away in the safe.

Someday when I'm gone, the wood pieces can be reinstalled and maximum value will be realized.

Plus when using that shotgun, I'm not concerned about beating up that beautiful walnut.

I went with Leupold 50mm objective scopes on the 30-06 and .375 H & H rifles, for maximum light gathering in dawn/dusk hunting situations.
But damn, they sure are expensive now.

Congratulations! Those two rifles will do 90% or greater of all North America hunting situations. (especially in the lower 48)

You should get one for the big bears and/or moose. You only "need" one more...


If you ever decide the 375HH might not be for you, email me.
 
Posts: 5036 | Location: Alaska | Registered: June 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
One Who Knows
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I have had to revisit this thread a couple times, just to gaze upon these beauties
 
Posts: 1467 | Location: Central MO | Registered: November 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Master of one hand
pistol shooting
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I have the baby brother in 308



SIGnature
NRA Benefactor CMP Pistol Distinguished
 
Posts: 5482 | Location: Duckburg, OR | Registered: September 01, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Wins
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The .30-06 is perfect. But the .270 bottom metal door is tight. Really tight. And the bottom metal needed to be shimmed so that the door would close. Without the shims, the door wouldn't snap shut. But with every shim, you take away a 1/2 thread from the action screws needed to secure the action. So I broke down and decided to relieve the areas of the stock causing the binding. The area where the cross bolt goes through was little thick. So I took about 1/32 of an inch off the bottom of that, refinished it, and resealed it. And then I relieved a little wood from the area near the latch where the shoulders of the door were touching. Now the bottom metal can be installed without any shims and the door will close without any interference. I stained the wood. Tomorrow I will touch up those areas with some gloss urethane. With the bottom metal door closed, you can't really see where the wood was relieved even without it being refinished. Now I can get maximum action screw engagement. That little bit of work took hours. A few strokes with 220 grit, fit, a few strokes, fit, a few strokes, fit. Until finally it's perfect, too. The joys of wood stocks.

I also bought some steel bottom metal with a Sako style release. I was going to install those, but may save them for now for later projects.


_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I needed to do something about the lack of recoil pads and length of pull so I've been researching local smiths who can properly fit a recoil pad, because I'm certain I'd regret it if I did it myself. The "Classic" butt plate is two parts using 4 screws. The center plate is easily removable, but the main plate would have to be cut off. I pains me to think of that - I wanted to preserve those butt plates, but the length of pull is too short for me. My nose was almost at the comb drop. I wanted to add a thick recoil pad to lengthen the pull. I was looking into alternatives and it appears the best solution was also the cheapest. I added a Pachmayr Decelerator slip-on pad to both rifles. That gives me about another inch of pull. Length of pull is increased to about 14 3/8". That's very comfortable for me. And they will let me keep the butt plates. I'm pretty happy with this simple, inexpensive solution.





_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Caribou gorn
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Just be careful about leaving that slip-on pad on all the time. They will cause the wood to discolor unevenly. I'd take it off when it's not afield.



I'm gonna vote for the funniest frog with the loudest croak on the highest log.
 
Posts: 9378 | Location: Marietta, GA | Registered: February 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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They are rubber and long term I'm not sure how it would react with the epoxy finish. They are soft rubber. I'll have to take them out occasionally and work them to keep them soft.

I was toying with the idea of ordering a Boyds stock and see how that works. I can order it with a longer pull and a thick recoil pad, along with checkering and a white line spacers between the black end caps, nearly replicating the stock that's on it.


_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
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Many years ago, Remington came out with some new fancy recoil pads. I recall them being from Sims Vibration Laboratory who actually made them. "Limbsavers"
Scientifically shown recoil reduction. I went all in for them. Several other companies sold the Limbsavers as well with factory "branding".
I put them on my Remington & Ruger rifles, shotguns, and T/C black powder guns. Basically anything in the safe that had a buttstock got one if they made a Sims pad for that firearm.

One day I'm out deer hunting and I lean my rifle up against a tree. When I picked it up, it brought a small pile of leaves, stuck to the recoil pad.
It seemed the recoil pad material had deteriorated over time.

Over the next several years, all of them went bad. They got very sticky. You would go to lift a long gun out of the safe and the recoil pad was stuck to the safe floor.

Good thing I am a packrat. I saved every recoil pad I had taken off when the fancy pads were installed. The hardest part was figuring out which one went where.

I would NOT leave those slip-on recoil pads installed when the rifle was not in use. At the first sign of them becoming sticky, heave them in the trash.



NRA Benefactor Life Member
NRA Instructor
USPSA Chief Range Officer
 
Posts: 1039 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Caribou gorn
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Here's an old Auto 5 I had for awhile that I'm assuming someone left a slip on pad on. Now I use leather slip on pads. They don't reduce recoil by a ton and only lengthen pull by 1/4" or so, but they are easy on/off.




I'm gonna vote for the funniest frog with the loudest croak on the highest log.
 
Posts: 9378 | Location: Marietta, GA | Registered: February 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truth Wins
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If your rubber gets sticky, powder it with pure cornstarch. I have an old pair of Japanese-made Tasco World Class binoculars that had some sort of soft-touch rubber coating on the body and they got sticky as hell over the years. The corn starch dries it up. Of course, it looks like it has some powder on it, even several years after putting it on, but the stickiness hasn't come back, and they still have the soft-touch feel to them.

As for these recoil pads, I don't know what that final decision will be. I don't even notice recoil when I shoot at a deer. But I do at the range, so they may be for the range only. I do like the increased pull, but the pull without them is livable. All I know for certain is that I'm not having the butt plates cut off.

I'll make a final decision when the scopes and mounts get here.

I am wishy washy when it comes to stuff like this. This is how one accumulates a large quantity of shooting stuff. I need to open an ebay page and sell off some of the stuff I've bought and ended up not using.


_____________
"I enter a swamp as a sacred place—a sanctum sanctorum. There is the strength—the marrow of Nature." - Henry David Thoreau
 
Posts: 4021 | Location: In The Swamp | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The Unmanned Writer
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Have a set in ADL.

Bought the .270 for my son. It's good for anything in the lower 48. The 30.06 is good for shunting in North America.

When reloading for the .270, first load had results less than .75 MOA. And it's duplicatible.









Only in an insane world are the sane considered insane.


 
Posts: 12291 | Location: It was Lat: 33.xxxx Lon: 44.xxxx now it's CA :( | Registered: March 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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