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Dry Fire drill schedule or routine? Login/Join 
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Been reading a lot of articles about the benefits of regular, consistent dry fire training.

Any one have any Dry Fire drill scedules, checklists, etc?

Apparently the SIG Academy had one, but I can't find it on the interweb.

Any and all suggestions, tips, etc will be appreciated.
 
Posts: 460 | Registered: December 12, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The Persian
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Steve Anderson and Ben Stoeger publish dry fire books with routines, how long/often they should be done, and other tips.


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Posts: 20052 | Location: At the wall | Registered: February 13, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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10 minutes a night.

For about four days, three years ago. Big Grin That's how dedicated I am. Wink


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Posts: 14680 | Location: A little box of pine on the 7:29 | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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2-3 times each week
1. From the ready 5 reps
2. From the ready Strong Hand Only 5 reps
3. From the ready Weak Hand only 5 reps
4. Draw from non-concealment 5 reps
5. Draw from concealment, open jacket, 5 reps
6. Draw from concealment, closed jacket, 5 reps
7. Empty Loads - 5 reps (use dummy rounds)
8. Tactical reloads - 5 reps
9. From the ready 5 reps to finish


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Tomorrow's battle is won during today's practice.
 
Posts: 1100 | Location: Mt. Lebanon, PA | Registered: June 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by PPGMD:
Steve Anderson and Ben Stoeger publish dry fire books with routines, how long/often they should be done, and other tips.


This. I use a mix of both. Prefer Stoeger's program and Anderson's accuracy mode/speed mode/match mode mental game philosophy. The books are reasonably cheap enough to buy both. Stoeger just revised his and Anderson's 3rd book has his latest and greatest thoughts on the subject as well as the "first 12" that he often refers to.

i dry fire 6 nights a week for 30-45 minutes. About half is stand and shoot drills, the other half is moving/field course type work.


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Posts: 4754 | Location: MS | Registered: June 09, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Tha1000
Would you please expand on the moving field coursework.
Thanks
Z
 
Posts: 202 | Location: TN | Registered: April 01, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by zymurgst:
Tha1000
Would you please expand on the moving field coursework.
Thanks
Z


It all depends on what I am working on, but is basically mini stages set up in my garage to work on deficiencies. It can be as simple or as complicated as you want it to be. Both of the books I referenced above have drills and/or ideas for drills that I use.

For example, right now I am working on wide transitions, so last night I set up a mini stage with two shooting positions... at the buzzer I engage target 1 and 2, which are a 180 degree transition, then haul ass into position two which required engaging two targets through a port, followed by a 90 degree transition and another 180 degree transition. My goals with this drill were to transition between targets aggressively, come in to the port low and ready to shoot, engaging those targets before i "set up", and calling my shots... accepting only A's and close C's and firing make ups on anything that looks off.

If I were working on position entry and exit, Steve Anderson has a very simple drill in his 3rd book called "call it and leave it" which involves 2 shooting boxes, 1 target, and a lot of running back and forth. You can probably find a full description of the drill on the internet or buy Anderson's book. I run this drill a LOT, both in dry fire and live fire.

If I am working on shooting on the move, I might just engage my dry fire arrays while moving front to back, back to front, diagonal, side to side, etc.

The closer I am to a match, the more likely I am to do these in Anderson's match mode, but I try and spend as much time in speed mode as possible.. trying to figure out how to do things faster/sooner/more efficiently. I.e. I pick a par time I know I can hit and then spend the rest of the time trying to figure out how I can do it faster.

I hope what I have typed makes sense.


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Posts: 4754 | Location: MS | Registered: June 09, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sigforum K9 handler
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My dry fire program consists of the following-
1- Trigger Control and reset drills.
2- Presentations
3- Moving the gun from one target point to another.
4. Whatever I suck at.

Number four is the biggie. If I have a deficiency in performance, either in a match or at the range, I'll bring it back and correct the problem in dry fire. Let's say for instance I miss a couple of reloads in a match, I'll come back and work on loading the gun in dry fire.

I really have two keys to successful dry fire. The first is break it down. If I am working on reloads, I'll start with simply hitting the index points on the magwell. After repetitions there, I'll add drawing the mag from the mag pouch, and hitting the index points. Then I'll do all of that and actually insert the mag. Then I'll work the slide. I get better results by breaking it down into small digestible chunks instead of doing the whole thing. On draws and presentations, I'll start out just pressing the gun out. Then work backwards into drawing from the holster.

The second big thing is going slow. If you compare dry fire to someone that runs, they never in a successful training program run at full speed all the time. The program includes slower training runs, fartlek, distance, hills, etc. They never run full out all the time. Dry fire helps me work through performance issues and it helps map the subconscious by giving it good technique to look at.

Dry fire to me is where the heavy lifting is done. Live fire is spot checking those skills and identifying weakness.


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Posts: 30636 | Location: Logical | Registered: September 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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