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quote:
Originally posted by critterdoc:
I'd appreciate your thoughts on submerging slides and receivers (field stripped) in water based ultrasonic cleaning solution in an ultrasonic cleaner. My limiited personal experience with the inexpensive 2.5 Liter Chicago Electric table top unit available from Harbor Freight and Sharpertek 725 Gun Cleaner convinces me that these devices can strip the separated metal parts of an AR bolt carrier group so well that rapid application of a protectant, such as some form of CLP or grease is essential to prevent flash corrosion.

That said, I'm wondering if available ultrasound lubricants such as Crest CC-400L Ultrasonic Lubricant or Sharpertek Ultrasonic Gun Lubricant would adequately PROTECT the internal components of a "field stripped" slide and receiver that had been first cleaned in water based ultrasonic cleaning solution such as Sharpertek 725 and Crest CC-235 Ultrasonic cleaner.

Do these ultrasound lubricants provide enough corrosion protection to stand on their own in the internal parts of the slide and receiver if they are used on a regular basis?

Lastly, Crest CC-235 and CC-400L are both labeled "Powerfully Removes Gun Powder, Carbon Dirt & Oil In Just Minutes; Leaves Entire Firearm Clean & Lubricated." What is the functional difference between the two products?


I use Ed's Red in my ultrasonic cleaner (minus the acetone). That does a decent job of cleaning while leaving behind a coating of ATF for lube. I blast it with my compressor to get rid of the excess.
 
Posts: 25 | Registered: February 04, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks very much. Your work is greatly appreciated. Peace.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: June 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A very old rule: Sigs like to be run wet. They are not like Glocks, which require six DROPS of oil on specific locations. Run Sigs wet and they will run well.


SIGnature: Jere
 
Posts: 1369 | Location: Colorado Springs, Colo. | Registered: October 11, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Surprised the Frog Lube-ers haven't chimed in...
 
Posts: 621 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: December 09, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Does this same cleaning regimen apply to alloy-framed Sig 1911's as well?
 
Posts: 51 | Registered: November 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You have to love this sticky and this forum.

We seem to have the grease vs oil issue down and to use a lot of it.
The longer this thread goes the more I learn. Lubriplate 105 from NAPA is adequate?
I have been using Weapon Shield in the past and it’s expensive.

I watched the http://www.sigsauer.com/Custom...intenanceGuides.aspx
As the tech was dry brushing the slide I’m thinking he has no idea how much grease Flork’s suggest. You would not be able to dry brush that grease out.
We have the lubrication aspect, what about how to clean all that grease out? From one post it looks like some of the grease the metal has to be cleaned with rubbing alcohol before applying so it adheres.
Flork’s how about some cleaning information? Even better, can you do a vid like the Sig guy does?
 
Posts: 40 | Location: USA | Registered: March 19, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I dunno about how Flork does it, but I use patches until I've got any trace of dusty grease out. If it's got a sheen, I don't worry about it.
 
Posts: 124 | Location: Montana | Registered: July 28, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was hoping that we would get some post on what members do to clean all that grease off and start over.
I'll start a diff. thread on cleaning.
 
Posts: 40 | Location: USA | Registered: March 19, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by jeeper:
What about good old graphite grease for the rails? It was always my understanding it has the ability to fill in the metal microscopic areas and leave a very slick running surface.

DanL

Clinically diagnosed sigophant


I concur. my new to me AE P229 has moderate wearing on the frame rails. So I also thought that the Extreme Pressure Moly-Graph grease that I picked up at Harbor Freight (along with a mini 3oz grease gun) would fit the application.

"Provides compounded protection with molybdenum and graphite to establish a fine micron plating on all working surfaces and withstand heavy load, water attack and shock loads. Use for automotive, industrial,...slides,...and more..."

The 14oz tube for $4 should last me years. And it's black, which is nice.
 
Posts: 2381 | Registered: May 30, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Flork:
I use grease on everything, including the barrel and the internals.


Thank you for the lubrication guide. It's been a great help to me. I am currently using Mil-Comm TW25B on my P229.
 
Posts: 17 | Location: Central California Coast | Registered: August 13, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by GreyCoupe:
Surprised the Frog Lube-ers haven't chimed in...

I use it on my 238, 226, and p30. 0 malfunctions so far.

Main reason I use it is because I fondle my guns ALOT and I hate having residue on my hands. All of the greases/CLPs i've used always get everywhere.


P238/P226
 
Posts: 12 | Location: Houston | Registered: April 26, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For rail lubrication I've begun using Loctite.

Seriously.

C5-A Anti-Seize lubricant. Copper-based. Looks exactly like the stuff Glock uses when they lube up their shiny...er...new guns at the factory...well, most of the time. My NIB G23 barely had a whiff of the stuff. Now rectified it has more than its fair share. Works great so far. My P229R is about due for a cleaning; will probably give this stuff a try on a SIG. Somehow seems like sacrilege.

1 oz tube (comes in bottles as well)
 
Posts: 8983 | Location: Drippin' wet | Registered: April 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I dunno about antiseize. I actually use this stuff for it's intended purpose or lubricated coarse metal threads on pipe fittings. It does a good job on iron pipe, but when used on aluminium boxes using steel bolts, it tends to bind things up. Having never used it on a gun, I recommend caution.
 
Posts: 124 | Location: Montana | Registered: July 28, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
addicted to trailing-throttle oversteer
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Originally posted by GremlinMT:
I dunno about antiseize. I actually use this stuff for it's intended purpose or lubricated coarse metal threads on pipe fittings. It does a good job on iron pipe, but when used on aluminium boxes using steel bolts, it tends to bind things up. Having never used it on a gun, I recommend caution.


Good point about dissimilar metals; didn't even cross my mind. With Glocks where the rail points are steel and a copper-based a/s is ideal, which is probably why Glock uses the stuff from the factory. Not so with an alloy SIG though I would think that a SS frame would be another matter.

I've used Jet-Lube 500 moly a/s with automotive parts to great effectiveness; handles all conditions flawlessly and works with all sorts of dissimilar materials against one another. Since I've already got a bunch of the Jet-Lube in my shop, I think I'll give that a try instead on one of my alloy pistols and see what happens.
 
Posts: 8983 | Location: Drippin' wet | Registered: April 18, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Out of curiosity, I have been using Lubriplate for the past year and just got back into Sigs, and have barely any Lubriplate left. It works great, but it is white.

Are any of these greases' that are good black and less noticeable?


------------------------
"...to disarm the people - that was the best and most effectual way to enslave them." - George Mason
 
Posts: 1228 | Location: Evans, GA | Registered: September 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I recently bought grease after reading Flork's thead. I did the research to find out what is good and found that Sigem has what you need. It's NOT black, still white.
Look in the classified for his thread.
 
Posts: 40 | Location: USA | Registered: March 19, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well, most bearing grease is black. Smile The stuff I'm using is clear.
 
Posts: 124 | Location: Montana | Registered: July 28, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm not trying to be a princess about it, its just that I have let a few people shoot my sigs in the past and they always ask what the white goop is between the slide and frame and at the rear of the slide where the frame is exposes for a few mm.


------------------------
"...to disarm the people - that was the best and most effectual way to enslave them." - George Mason
 
Posts: 1228 | Location: Evans, GA | Registered: September 27, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I didn't mean to imply that you were. I use Dow Corning Valve Stem Lubricant 111. It's designed to work in temperatures from -40 to 392. Living in Montana, that's warm enough. I have very little wear. Current round count is under 1500 so that does not mean much. There is always plenty of lubricant to wipe off after a match. It clings to the gun really well. I never get it all off, there is always a sheen unless I use a degreasing solvent. I'm happy with it's performance. The data sheet says this stuff is white, on the gun, it's clear. I don't know why they say it's white.
 
Posts: 124 | Location: Montana | Registered: July 28, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Austerity:
The problem with black grease is that it might be less noticeable when a little excess oozes out on a blue gun, but it is going to be very noticeable on hands and clothes. And a lot harder to get off. I still have some of the old Gunslick graphited grease and an industrial lube with MoS2 and seldom use them because they stain so badly. I use Lubriplate or regular re-oiling.
 
Posts: 2807 | Location: Florence, Alabama, USA | Registered: July 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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