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With ammo prices being what they are, I've been considering getting a nice .22 pistol and am not opposed to buying used if its in decent condition and has been well taken care of. Not really interested in a Mosquito, but the Sig Trailside looks interesting. Does anyone own one/have experience with one.

Will probably be used primarily for plinking, although I've also been considering trying bullseye shooting, particularly since my local club has a pretty active league.

Another possible alternative would be a S&W 41, but I think those are pretty pricey.
 
Posts: 503 | Location: Boston, MA | Registered: March 25, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have two. They are very accurate and easy to shoot, and very reliable as .22LR semi-autos go. Both came with a test target showing less than 1" group at 25 yards. Two stage trigger is fantastic too. Really this is as close as you will get to a $2000 target pistol for 1/4 of the cost. And they really were made in Switzerland.

I have a 6" standard with an Ultradot, and a 6" target with adjustable sights. The barrel dovetail is very similar to a CZ 452 American - bigger than 3/8", and not 11mm. Leupold 13mm rimfire rings fit nicely.

They do have some history of small parts breakage, and battering of the trigger guard by the slide (has a pull down guard with takedown like a Walther PPK). Best to use Standard Velocity ammo (CCI Std. is fine) instead of high velocity. I broke a slide stop on one, but Sig fixed it under warranty (not an option now) and the plastic safety plug came loose which I replaced with parts I bought. Best not to use the safety at all.

I have a 41 too and the Trailsides are better to shoot IMO.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Lefty Sig,
 
Posts: 2557 | Location: Indiana | Registered: December 28, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have not shot a trailside but have generally heard good things. As you certainly know, any guns and ammo are hard to find right now (.22 ammo is scarce but as bad as 9mm or defensive calibers) I am still finding it intermittently locally for pre panic prices)
I decided to buy a new .22 recently ( I am more of an old classics guy, but needed a gun with threads for a hopefully soon out of jail suppressor) and decided on a smith and wesson victory.
 
Posts: 2748 | Location: Finally free in AZ! | Registered: February 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a pair of Trailsides also. As Lefty Sig mentioned, they are very accurate, easy to shoot, and very reliable.
I pretty much agree w/ everything Lefty Sig said.
 
Posts: 5985 | Location: MI | Registered: May 22, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yup, I also a two Trailsides, 4 1/2" and 6". They have a reputation for great accuracy and with my two I certainly can vouch for that. They also have a reputation for being somewhat delicate and breakable. Fortunately I've yet to experience those lows, knock wood. Avoid high power/velocity loads (MiniMag, etc) and that will go a long way in preserving a Trailside. These two are my favorite .22 pistols, though I will say that my S&W Victory is right up there as well.


-MG
 
Posts: 621 | Location: The commie, rainy side of WA | Registered: April 19, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had one way back in the day. Felt great in the hand which is why I bought it (impulse buy at a gun show).

It was the basic 4.5" model. It shot OK but nothing special. I sold it because I was worried about it's reputation for breaking and because mags were hard to come by and very expensive when you did find them.

I won't say its a bad gun but I think there are better options available. Just my $.02
 
Posts: 44 | Location: Northern KY | Registered: January 07, 2021Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've a few of them. Under the covers its a hammerli and that means mags and parts aren't seriously problematic at this point. Mags are not hard to find and not very expensive. But its a bit of an odd duck. Not quite a full on full target pistol, but complete overkill for plinking. Me I'd just get the ruger, buckmark or victory of your liking and be happier.
The S&W 41 is a completely different animal. For plinking I can't imagine paying the entry price. But it is a classic in every possible way.


“So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.”
 
Posts: 9273 | Registered: October 14, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The 41 from the performance center comes with a rail for mounting an RMR and is a lot of fun to shoot. The pistol has been made for several decades and is a fantactic shooter. Cost? I bought my first one for $275. Of course, my most recent one cost a little more but I think we only live once so what the heck. It's good enough to hand it off to the next generation.
 
Posts: 1041 | Location: Northern Nevada | Registered: December 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've had a Trailside with a 4.5" barrel since 2004. It's the most accurate .22LR handgun that I own. Its ergonomics are quite nice, and as others have said, it is most reliable with standard velocity ammunition. There are a number of parts that have had a reputation for being prone to breaking, so the Trailside is a pistol to be somewhat babied and enjoyed.
 
Posts: 15 | Location: Chicago area | Registered: April 01, 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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ACP1 - if you ever want to sell that 41 I'd be happy to take it off your hands and give you a nice profit ... say $25. I'll even pay for shipping.Smile
 
Posts: 503 | Location: Boston, MA | Registered: March 25, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ruger Mark II’s, SP101 and a GP100 have been fantastic .22lr options from my experience. All stainless all the time.



God Bless You and Your House,

Mark
www.bikersforchrist.org
 
Posts: 93 | Registered: November 10, 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Trailside? Feels lightweight and flimsy. More target pistol than plinker. Avoid high velocity ammo, too. You know, the only kind you're likely to find anywhere. Better idea? Forget about it. I sold mine and bought a Buckmark. Sturdy and dependable.
 
Posts: 166 | Location: SW Michigan | Registered: August 16, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Samps:
Trailside? Feels lightweight and flimsy. More target pistol than plinker. Avoid high velocity ammo, too. You know, the only kind you're likely to find anywhere. Better idea? Forget about it. I sold mine and bought a Buckmark. Sturdy and dependable.


THIS. I've never owned a Trailside but was highly interested when SIG was selling them, they were also having some sort of problem which I cannot remember what it was, then they announced discontinuing them, So I bought a Buckmark standard S/S with URX grips and never looked back. The Buckmark is a terrific .22
 
Posts: 20580 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Blasphemy for not recommending a Sig on this forum...but go find yourself a S&W 422. Reliable, easy to take apart and clean, threaded for suppressor, and low bore axis.

Way under rated
 
Posts: 1143 | Location: Wisconsin  | Registered: May 27, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I enjoyed my Trailside for several years and it was very accurate. But the flaking nickel finish, ammo sensitivity and the barrel weight constantly coming loose made me move on. I bought a Ruger Mark 2 and never looked back. The Ruger's trigger is just as good and it's just as accurate for half the price.


Proverbs 21:31
 
Posts: 430 | Registered: September 17, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My Trailside became so unsafe and worn out that when I sent it in to SIG service they replaced it with a Brand New Pistol! I imagine this is why SIG quit carrying them, they were too fragile. I use it now when training new shooters since it's lightweight and has the tiniest bit of recoil to start transitioning new shooters into larger calibers. Other 22 pistols are enough heavier that they don't have the same recoil.

I have S&W model 41's and they are indeed the Cadillac of 22 pistols but at the moment I don't shoot them as much as others because mine don't have a red Dot mounted on them.

Ruger's are an excellent choice. I bought my first one on my 21st birthday. It needed a repair after 150,000rds or so but Ruger accomplished that quickly and it's back into service. So many variants are available. They are relatively inexpensive extremely durable and easy to work on. Ton's of aftermarket accessories available.

Buckmarks are what I've been shooting the most over the last several years. I bought one with a slightly heavier barrel and rail for a red dot. I can't tell you how many thousands of rounds I've put through it. My Gun Club has a 22lr plinking range with dozens of moving, resettable metal targets and with that pistol it's one of the funnest ways to fire off a couple thousand rounds in an afternoon. Buy a bunch of extra mags and a magazine loader! Buckmark trigger are reasonably easy to work on. The right spring and a spring flip makes a huge difference by itself in the trigger pull. Even just removing the magazine inserted safety bar improves the trigger a good bit and thats a super simple 1 screw take it out fix.

If I were going to buy one tomorrow it would either be a BuckMark or a Ruger. There are other decent pistols out there but they haven't yet withstood the test of Decades in production like the Ruger or Buckmark. Find the BuckMark or Ruger that fits your personal wants and have a blast. Hint Hint Red Dot sites on a 22lr are a BLAST!!


Remember, this is all supposed to be for fun...................
 
Posts: 3975 | Registered: April 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the comments. Warnings about the gun being fragile/breaking parts echos what I'd heard. Seems to be a lot of love for the Rugers and Buckmarks, so might be worth a look.

SW422 is also pretty intriguing. Like the low bore axis and looks like it might be relatively cheap and a fun plinker.

But I'm also going to keep looking at the SW41. It's just such a classic, well made, very accurate and sounds like it's got a very good stock trigger. Plus, I like the grip angle of my 1911's and it sounds like the 41 has a similar feel.

Definitely hear you guys on red dots. I've never had them on any of my pistols until recently, but as my eyes start to deteriorate there is no question that I am faster AND more accurate with a red dot.

So I guess that leads to one final question - if I end up getting an older SW41 how difficult will it be to mount a red dot on it? The two guns I currently have red dots on are pre-cut for them, so mounting was pretty straightforward.
 
Posts: 503 | Location: Boston, MA | Registered: March 25, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Houndog:
Thanks for the comments. Warnings about the gun being fragile/breaking parts echos what I'd heard. Seems to be a lot of love for the Rugers and Buckmarks, so might be worth a look.

SW422 is also pretty intriguing. Like the low bore axis and looks like it might be relatively cheap and a fun plinker.

But I'm also going to keep looking at the SW41. It's just such a classic, well made, very accurate and sounds like it's got a very good stock trigger. Plus, I like the grip angle of my 1911's and it sounds like the 41 has a similar feel.


Houndog - what exactly are you looking for in a .22 pistol or how do you envision using it?

I've had a number of different 22 pistols over years but I think I'm down to my final, permanent 3... a S&W 41, a Ruger MKIV 22/45 and a Taurus TX-22. Those 3 are all over the map price, quality and style wise but they all serve their purposes well for me.

The 41 is a serious quality and very accurate gun I love the gun but its mostly a target/bulleye kind of gun and I don't really do much serious target shooting so its the one I use the least (but doubt I will ever sell it either).

The 22/45 is mainly my suppressor host. Once of the things I really like about it is I like to customize and modify guns and the aftermarket support for the Ruger MK series is unreal. You could have 5 to 10 of them all setup completely different. You could also build one usually almost entirely no actual Ruger made parts. A lot of fun.

The TX-22 is my most recent purchase and I have to say, no-one is more shocked then me that I bought and would ever recommend a Taurus but I think they really nailed this one. Don't get me wrong, quality wise its not on the same level as the other 2 but the one I have has been 100% reliable so far, feels great in the hands and has a 16rd flush fit magazine which is almost unheard of for a 22 pistol and all of that for under $300 brand new. They are a great deal IMO. This my training/teach new shooters gun.

I would not want to be without any of them but if I had to pick just 1, it would probably be the 22/45 as it fails into the middle of the pack. Not as high quality or accurate as the 41 but not that far off either but it is much more practical then the 41. It is slightly higher quality then the Taurus (or at least has a much longer proven track record) and would work (albeit not as well IMO) for the same tasks I use the TX-22 for.

quote:
Originally posted by Houndog:
So I guess that leads to one final question - if I end up getting an older SW41 how difficult will it be to mount a red dot on it? The two guns I currently have red dots on are pre-cut for them, so mounting was pretty straightforward.

Depends on how old of one you get? For the first 20-30 years, they were not drilled or taped for any kind of scope mount. Don't remember exactly when they started but sometime around the 80's (maybe 90's?) they started coming from the factory drilled and tapped for a mount. As long as you get one of the ones already D'ed and T'ed, they are relatively easy to put a red dot on.
 
Posts: 44 | Location: Northern KY | Registered: January 07, 2021Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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airgunner - I've been shooting pistols and rifles for years, but mostly plinking/target shooting. Now that I'm retired and have some free time I've started to think about doing some low key competitive shooting.

Unfortunately, I've come to realize that, with my current skill set, I'm not really accurate enough to be a bulls-eye shooter or fast enough for the steel challenge/IDPA stuff. But, I'm willing to put my pride aside and give both a try. Probably start with Steel Challenge type stuff since I'm much more comfortable shooting two hands and can consistently hit most of the targets in any given stage - it's just that I'm going to be REALLY SLOW.

Bullseye stuff looks really interesting and my natural bias has always been towards shooting accurately vs. shooting fast. However, while I consider myself a pretty decent shot I can't match the accuracy of a decent bullseye shooter - and that's shooting slow fire and with two hands.

But even if I get discouraged in my competitive pursuits, I would use this gun as a way to conserve my limited supply of 9mm and .45. So, frequent trips to the range where I would either be shooting steel plates at 10-30 yards, or shooting paper at 50' with the goal of producing a single ragged hole.
 
Posts: 503 | Location: Boston, MA | Registered: March 25, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Then I would recommend either the Ruger MKIV series or one of the Browning Buckmarks. Both are widely available, good, proven, reliable generally purpose guns that will work fine for action shooting sports like IDPA or steel matches and won't break the bank. Which one will come down to what you can find locally, which one feels better in your hands and/or points more naturally for you and then just personal preference? Both have options for improving the trigger or installing a red dot but after market supports is better for the Ruger then the Browning.

FYI - I tried to run my S&W 41 in a steel match once and lets just say I won't do that again. Nice gun but its not meant for or setup well for action shooting.
 
Posts: 44 | Location: Northern KY | Registered: January 07, 2021Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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