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If buying a new gun you would want you grandkids to have someday, what would it be? Login/Join 
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S&W 686 .357 4-inch pre lock.

S&W 66 .357 2.5 inch pre lock.

M1 Garand .30-06 (Winchester or I.H.).

W. German Sig Sauer P226 9mm.

Remington 870 Police 12-gauge.

Remington 700 Tactical Police .308.

Colt 6920 5.56 AR-15.
 
Posts: 692 | Location: Arkansas | Registered: September 25, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I recently went through a similar experience in the process of finishing off my wife's and my will. In order to minimize conflict among my three adult daughters (all shooters), I laid out all my firearms on my bed (okay, also a few chairs and dressers), and had them make alternating picks. Their preferences fell into two categories - guns they'd actually use, and guns that they most closely associate with me, either from my having carried them or using them taught them to teach them to shoot. Of course they all got a gun we chose jointly when they moved away from home.

For the guns I've been buying with my grand kids in mind, I'm focusing mostly on .22's for them to enjoy and likely learn on when they reach shooting age, and then keep for a lifetime. In rifles so far, I've picked up a Winchester 9422, a Browning SA22, a Marlin model 60, and a small Rossi version of my grail gun, a Winchester 62A. In handguns so far, I've got a Beretta 71 in .22, a Walther PP in .22, Colt .22/.22 mag single action, and a few others that don't come immediately to mind. I'm also on the hunt for a Colt Government .380 as a first center fire gun for one of them.

I figure that by the time my grand kids reach shooting age, there will be all kinds of cool plastic wonder-guns that will be all the rage. The classics, though, will be even harder to find and afford than they are now.
 
Posts: 124 | Location: Atlanta, GA | Registered: May 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Gloom, despair and
agony on me.
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Posts: 4298 | Location: Texas | Registered: July 22, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A stainless featherweight supergrade .243 with highly figured walnut. Sorry not a pistol.
 
Posts: 2850 | Location: San Marcos,Tx. | Registered: July 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oriental Redneck
Picture of 12131
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quote:
Originally posted by drabfour:
Get these and call it a day. Big Grin

You will never be able to get all the dirt out of them guns, no matter how hard you try.


Q


2016 MAGA ---> 2020 KAG
* P228 factoids *


 
Posts: 17913 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
semi-reformed sailor
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1911, my duty gun, a P226 in 357SIG and my grandfathers S&W victory model 10 in 38 special.



"Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than has any other factor.”
― Robert A. Heinlein, Starship Troopers

 
Posts: 6088 | Location: Texas! | Registered: October 07, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I wouldn't worry so much about what type of gun. Get what ever you like and would enjoy shooting with the kids/grandkids. I the end, the guns that hold the memories will be the most valuable to them.
Don't discount the plastic fantastic guns either I would have loved a gen 1 glock if it would have been passed down from my dad.
 
Posts: 2352 | Registered: March 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've got a couple W. German Sigs that'd probably be good inheritance items but who knows what's gonna happen. If live into my 60's I'll probably give a few away to my kids. They'll probably sell them off to buy the newest X box or some newfangled gold plated thing. My wife already said she'll garage sale them for $100 each.

I'm not convinced it's worth the mental wattage to plan these things out. Just buy what you want now if it makes you happy cause most likely it'll be sold to pay rent somewhere down the road.
 
Posts: 9 | Registered: April 06, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My mom used to frequent estate sales. She accumulated many blue vases and other items via that process. She has many blue vases now.

Back then, she loved to tell of the amazing bargains that she exploited at those sales. But she never seemed to question why such “precious” items always seemed to be available at a huge discount at an estate sale.
 
Posts: 17 | Registered: June 24, 2019Reply With QuoteReport This Post
E tan e epi tas
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If you are looking for something fairly sure to appreciate in value go odd and limited. A P7M8/13 would be a good choice. Actually I bet you those Hudson H9s will fetch a hefty price some day.

That being said if you are just looking to pass on a memory, an emotion etc. it doesn’t matter. I have a Pre 64 Winchester thutty thutty my “Puppy” hunted with. Nothing special but special to me and I don’t even hunt. I have an old Winchester 62 that came from a great Uncle. Again nothing to write home about but not only is it an awesome little shooter it is a tangible connection to the past, the family.

All that said you cannot go wrong with GOBS of cold hard cash or nazi gold either. Smile


"Guns are tools. The only weapon ever created was man."
 
Posts: 4176 | Location: Nashville, TN | Registered: July 25, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My dad is still using my grandparents firearms, but a few are earmarked for me.

Of those, the only ones I really have a 'jones'ing for are the ones that I have a shared memory of using with them- High Standard Sentinel Deluxe R-106 revolver and Colt 1917 .45acp revolver.


I am firmly of the camp that there are three main things to consider when making a choice of what to leave to whom:

1- what shared memories do you have with that firearm and that person?

2- what interest do they show about firearms and types?

3- are you leaving it for them as an heirloom, a field tool, or an investment?


I have step-kids who aren't interested in firearms. This is a passion that will die out in my generation. Maybe I'll find a friend with a good kid who would respect them, and leave some to them.

However, I am more likely to be leaving all of them for sale, and the money split between the kids [unless my wife outlives me- and then she gets all and can split whatever she wants].

I think memories are the key. If you don't have any shared memories of shooting with the grandkids- make some, and then leave THAT firearm to them.


Sig P226, P220 Carry Stainless Elite, and a bunch of non-sigs. Smile
 
Posts: 531 | Location: South San Joaquin Valley, CA | Registered: September 21, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A P226 X5 in 9mm and a blued 6" Colt Python. Those are the two special ones I'd like to see stay in the family when I'm gone. The rest are just tools.
 
Posts: 165 | Location: SE Michigan | Registered: June 15, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Doin' what I can
with what I got
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quote:
Originally posted by 12131:
Make it a theme. Buy one each of the US military sidearms from the 1911 until now. 1911, M9, M11, Mk25, M17, M18.


Mk23!!!


----------------------------------------
Death smiles at us all. Be sure you smile back.
 
Posts: 5315 | Registered: May 11, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Doin' what I can
with what I got
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Classics and conversation pieces for this.

I very much covet my father's small collection pf classic S&W autos (a pair of 59s - one of which I bought for him - and a 659, plus a nickel 586) because I learned to shoot, and enjoy shooting, on those guns.

His larger gun collection is of interest to me because those were the first guns I shot, and largely, I helped him build that collection from a smattering of hunting guns and a few defensive weapons into quite a spread of unique stuff.

They keys are the memories. Barring that, get something that will be worth money and appreciable in the future (1911, custom BHP, classic Smith/Colt revolvers, P210).

A few "assault rifles" may be good, given the fickleness of the legislature...but that assumes they would be transferrable in a few decades, and that's (sadly) not a given.


----------------------------------------
Death smiles at us all. Be sure you smile back.
 
Posts: 5315 | Registered: May 11, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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About a year before my grandpa passed away I asked him what he would do with his beloved K31. He used to be a passionate 300m targetshooter, but had to quit because of his health so that rifle was dear to him.

He gave it to me anyway, since it was no use to him anyway and he knew that I was into shooting.

About 2004, when he died my uncle, who also was an enthousiatic 300m targetshooter, was really disappointed that the K31 of his father had gone missing. I soon cleared up the mistery and gave the K31 including the sought after diopter-sights to him. It's really more use to him anyway and being his son, it belongs to him anyway.


The citizen watches the watchman, not the taxpayer.
 
Posts: 696 | Location: Switzerland | Registered: September 22, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Engraving usually hurts value so I wouldn't recommend it.
Legacy firearms can be fickle as you can never predict the future. My list for what it's worth.
S&W 629 5" classic 44mag, stainless, powerful, accurate, all steel, perfectly balanced, the perfect handgun for whatever ails you.
S&W 686+ no longer than 6" ( I prefer 4" or shorter) 357 mag, everything above just lighter and smaller.
Colt 1911 national match 45 ACP, Iconic perfection, enough said.
Browning Belgium Hi-Power 9mm, all steel, a balanced work of art.
For a rifle,I would pick......
Springfield Armory M1a loaded or National Match or equivalent build a capable classic that anyone would be proud to own, especially with a "mini me" clone Ruger Mini-14; one for long range precision marksmanship and one for short range work and fun.


It's a shame that youth is wasted on the young --- Mark Twain

Anyone who is not a liberal by age 20 has no heart; anyone who is not a conservative by age 40 has no brain---Winston Churchill
 
Posts: 4569 | Location: The Free State of Georgia | Registered: August 01, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by FAL'er:
I've got a couple W. German Sigs that'd probably be good inheritance items but who knows what's gonna happen. If live into my 60's I'll probably give a few away to my kids. They'll probably sell them off to buy the newest X box or some newfangled gold plated thing. My wife already said she'll garage sale them for $100 each.

I'm not convinced it's worth the mental wattage to plan these things out. Just buy what you want now if it makes you happy cause most likely it'll be sold to pay rent somewhere down the road.


^And what he said^


It's a shame that youth is wasted on the young --- Mark Twain

Anyone who is not a liberal by age 20 has no heart; anyone who is not a conservative by age 40 has no brain---Winston Churchill
 
Posts: 4569 | Location: The Free State of Georgia | Registered: August 01, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I can only relate my recent thoughts, having gone through a similar experience.

What matters is the connection the firearm in question makes with my Father, his life, his story, our shared experience.

He was a practical man, on his firearms show that. They are high quality, no frills, tools, with honest wear. His pistol was carried and used in multiple countries (possibly scores, but only know first hand of "several"). His shotgun started putting meat on the table before he was a teenager, because it was needed. It put meat on the table when I was a teenager because teenagers need time with their fathers no matter how busy life is. His rifle will hunt again because it can.

They all continue to teach, and as I gather parts for future repairs when they are needed, I know they will continue to teach and connect generations to come.


When all else fails... Tenacity
 
Posts: 27 | Location: People's Republic of California | Registered: April 03, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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CZ 83 7.65mm with 15 round magazine

SIG M11-A1

Ruger GP 100

BCM Ar 15


Democracy is 2 Wolves & a Lamb Debating what to have for Lunch

Liberty is a Well Armed Lamb!!!
 
Posts: 526 | Registered: March 03, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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S&W Model 41 - 22 lr pistol



 
Posts: 211 | Location: OH | Registered: January 08, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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